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5.0 out of 5 stars A triumphant war...yet stained.
Scott Bakker, has finally brought the epic trilogy to its end. Through war, strife, heart-ache, numerous betrayals and revelations the characters have finally reached their goal. The Holy City of Shimeh. I loved this book, however, I have to say I was a bit disappointed by the rushed ending. Perhaps Scott was having to deal with a deadline or perhaps not...it maybe...
Published on Oct. 21 2008 by Ali Siddiqui

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written, but you have to study the history for this 3rd one
The first two books in this series (The Darkness That Comes Before and The Warrior Propeht) really set the bar high: the were beautifully written, featured several complex characters and an excellent major plot with several sub plot lines. They were a little complicated in the "world" created by the books, but not deterringly so.

This one, though just as...
Published on Feb. 16 2007 by Larry Ketchersid


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written, but you have to study the history for this 3rd one, Feb. 16 2007
The first two books in this series (The Darkness That Comes Before and The Warrior Propeht) really set the bar high: the were beautifully written, featured several complex characters and an excellent major plot with several sub plot lines. They were a little complicated in the "world" created by the books, but not deterringly so.

This one, though just as beautifully written, was a struggle to get through. Not nearly as good as the first two, and, because of the fast ending, seems like it was written under a severe deadline.

The plot obviously continues from the second book (and, people with poor memories like me will appreciate the 20+ page "what has come before" summary at the beginning of the book) where Kellhus the Dunyain has assumed control of the Holy War through logic and manipulation. Achamian is helping him, but struggling with that path, in no small part because Kellhus has taken Achamian's wife as his own (when Achamian was feared dead). Cnaiur believes himself mad or possesed or both, and follows his own path to redemption. All head for Shimeh, the Holy City now held by heathens, where Kellhus has been "summoned" to see and sent to assasinate his father.

The characters again are beautifully wrought and described, especially Achamian, Esmet and Cnaiur.

Three major complaints. Bakker asks his readers not only to enter his world, but to study it. The PB version has 100 pages of Glossary out of a 500 page book, and in some of the passages, it feels like you've got to read them all to understand what is happening. Very confusing at times.

Second, the end flys by. A lot of action and things tied up in a very short period of time.

Third, it's not an obvious end. There are many questions left unanswered, obviously a fourth book or a new series coming next.

I will continue reading Mr. Bakker's works, because he tackles a lot, presents a new version of fantasy writing different than most, and I learn a lot from his style of writing. But he set the bar high with the first two novels, and this one, while still good, is not at their level.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Prince of Narcissists, Sept. 10 2007
By 
Perschon (Edmonton, AB, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
R. Scott Bakker's third installment in the Prince of Nothing series should have been called "The Thousand Self-Absorbed People", since almost all the characters are literal narcissists, or under the sway of one. While this "realist" approach to the fantasy epic felt fresh in the first two installments, I found the third nigh unreadable due to the preponderance of the character's selfish actions; is anyone besides Achamian pursuing a higher goal here? As for Kellhus, the ostensible protagonist of the series, the unbeatable Messiah motif gets old really fast. It's why Superman doesn't really work once the origin and initial revelation is unpacked. If you can't beat him, there's no tension, and no one cares. If I want Philosophy, I'll take a class. While the first book was incredible and the second really well written, the third is simply beating a dead horse.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A well-written series that falls flat in the end..., Feb. 6 2009
By 
Why Not (Toronto, ON, Can) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Thousandfold Thought (Mass Market Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed ploughing through Bakker's trilogy: the characters were strong, interesting and distinctive, the storyline was epic, compelling, intelligent and unique, the writing itself was of good quality...

I was truly looking forward to the end, to seeing how everything turned out for everyone involved! What was Bakker going to do with such a unique story?! How were his fascinating characters going to end up?!

And then ... when the end came near ... nothing but a surprisingly flat disappointment.

I did enjoy the trilogy for the most part - this is a refreshingly unique spin on fantasy, steeped in philosophy, quite original, an enjoyable read - but hopefully if you read the series you'll enjoy the ending (was there an ending?!) more than I did!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A triumphant war...yet stained., Oct. 21 2008
By 
Ali Siddiqui (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
Scott Bakker, has finally brought the epic trilogy to its end. Through war, strife, heart-ache, numerous betrayals and revelations the characters have finally reached their goal. The Holy City of Shimeh. I loved this book, however, I have to say I was a bit disappointed by the rushed ending. Perhaps Scott was having to deal with a deadline or perhaps not...it maybe that he intends to produce a fourth book as the conclusion really does lend itself for explanation.

All the beloved characters had all of their "tracks" neatly tied but some left me wanting more, especially concerning my favourite character Achamian who is left desolate and alone once again. The ending certainly makes one feel absolute pity for him...I won't spoil it but it is a real heartrending scene. If anything the odd turns in the book are made up for by the awe inspiring Glossary in the back of the Paperback book. It really helps that this time instead of dividing names and places by their factions and allegiances as in the previous two books the glossary for the third is all alphabetical which makes it easier to go through.

I highly recommend this book to fans of Steven Erikson's Malazan books. Because Scott and Steven are going to revolutionize Canadian literature and I can't wait.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Pleasant to read, Feb. 22 2006
The final installment of The Prince of Nothing leaves you with a sense of 'not wanting it to be over'. The entire series was such that it saddens me to have it end. The Prince of Nothing series is a good read and flows well. The action sequences are well done and the dialog keeps it flowing without bogging it down.
**A book I would also recommend is The Unsuspecting Mage by Brian S. Pratt. This, the first installment of The Morcyth Saga is a great beginning for a new author. Battles, magic, gods, secret passages and intrigue, all the elements of a classic epic fantasy! Any fantasy reader will enjoy it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great conclusion to an epic trilogy, Jan. 30 2006
By 
R. Nicholson - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
A fabulous finale!
This is the concluding book in the “Prince of Nothing” trilogy by Scott Bakker. I'd waited in eager anticipation for this release; I was not disappointed.
The book effectively ties up the loose ends of previous episodes and (thankfully) comes to a definitive ending; and yet, not surprisingly, it may have opened a few new treads at the conclusion as well. This book deals with the same major characters as the previous books; that being Kellhus, Achamian(Akka), Esmenet and Cnaiur, as well as a new “concern” that was mentioned passingly in previous books.
Well written, gripping and intriguing right from the word go, this book was a page turner; also there was an erotic quality in some areas that was “intense” to say the least. As with most great fantasy novels there is a liberal dose of magic, deceit, love, betrayal and some really great battles.
In addition to the storyline itself, there are 3 maps at the back of the book to keep you abreast of the Holy Wars' locations: as well, there is a 100 page “Encyclopedic Glossary” at the end of this book giving added descriptions of persons, places and things mentioned in the trilogy. (it's this “glossary” that makes you realize the depth of research of the storyline that the author has put into developing this epic fantasy)
And yet, despite the greatness of the story, there were segments of this book that I did not find easy to read; e.g. I found I really had to concentrate hard (and sometimes read repeatedly) for some of the philosophical discussions between Akka and Kellhus and also for some chapters of the internal musings of Akka and Cnaiur as they went through periods of internal upheaval. This “concern” however is a minor complaint when weighed against the overall quality of the rest of this book.
All in all, if you liked the previous installments of this series, I think you will find the conclusion equally enjoyable. Recommended! 4 & ½ stars.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rough around the edges, April 30 2010
By 
Jorge A. Borrayo (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I mean literally it is the book I wanted, but the edges are not even, almost as if this is a lesser quality edition.
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The Thousandfold Thought
The Thousandfold Thought by R. Scott Bakker (Mass Market Paperback - Jan. 12 2007)
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