Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage pinata Kindle Music Deals Store Cycling Tools minions Cook

Customer Reviews

15
4.2 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-10 of 10 reviews(5 star)show all reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
This is a beautifully written novel. It has been written by an author with a clear eye for intuitive observation as well as a superior ability to use words as effective tools.

The setting is cultural and familial dislocation for individuals as they move between countries. We follow this through social events, political upheaval and the weight of individual and collective expectations. While the primary characters are Indian and the countries involved are India, the USA and the UK, many of the observations and challenges identified would be common to all who move from the 'the known' to 'the unknown'.

The saddest lesson of all, perhaps, is that having left, one can never really return.

The primary characters are each in their own way outsiders: the Judge and his orphaned grand-daughter, the cook and his son. The cook's son carries the weight of expectations and need of an entire community of extended families as he tries to make it in the USA.

This is a novel to enjoy, and to think about.

Highly recommended

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on December 9, 2006
With setting ranging from New York to India, this book reminded me at times of KITE RUNNER. But the comparison ended there. This was one of three books I recently pick out of the blue and it turned out to be great. (the other two were MIDDLESEX by Eugenides and the quirky and funny KATZENJAMMER by McCrae---both of which were equally good and TOTALLY different from INHERITANCE OF LOSS. If you're looking for a book that has exotic locales and characters that jump off the page, INHERITANCE will work for you. If you want a page turner that zips along, this might not be the road to take. I still recommend it highly, along with the novel A LONG WAY DOWN by Hornby.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
If you like humorous books about how people live self-sabotaging lives to preserve their illusions of superiority, The Inheritance of Loss will delight you. If you prefer a novel that carries a strong plot line and significant developments you cannot predict, you'll wonder why anyone would read this book.

As I read the book, I was reminded of P.G. Wodehouse's writing. Mr. Wodehouse's novels were all rather similar, silly, and filled with predictable situations. But on each page there was a sentence that was so novel, fresh, and intriguing that it would stop your eyes while you thought about what you had just read.

Ms. Desai demonstrates a similar ability to create startling writing, but in her case the writing brings out loud laughter . . . at least it does for me. My wife said she hadn't heard me laugh so much while reading a book in years.

Here's an example. A group of young men is demonstrating in favor of independence. One talks about a better world he wants to create: "We will provide jobs for our sons. We will give dignity to our daughters carrying heavy loads, breaking stone on the road." That vision of male liberation has to make you laugh.

The other genius of the book is demonstrated by the ironies that Ms. Desai shares with us to suggest that our dreams are pretty dangerous. Why are they so dangerous? Dreams assume we control what happens to use. Ms. Desai is describing a world where someone with a sense of humor is running the show. For example, her father strives hard to become an astronaut . . . but loses his life in a mundane accident in a country he would never have visited if he hadn't had such a dream.

You could draw the conclusion from that example that Ms. Desai is a cynic. Actually, she loves people and finds them comically naive when it comes to pursuing their dreams. Her prescription would be to get some good information and then choose a direction that is practical for accomplishing something you want. Too many of the dreams she portrays are about class, status, and envy. Those dreams should always be suspect. Her vision is of a world where those perceptions should be no longer relevant, as A Passage to India taught.

I liked the way that she combined the ideas of people traveling to other countries and to other parts of Asia in search of something that they thought they couldn't find at home. That's why I called the book a reverse Passage to India. The most developed characters in this book are Indians who left India for at least a time in search of their dreams.

Be prepared for much fun. The book's main drawback from my perspective is that the humorous sentences thinned out considerably in the final third of the book, giving the ending a tone that didn't match the earlier fun. The marvelous ironies continue but they aren't so much fun.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 15, 2009
Wonderfully powerful novel. Using postcolonialism as a framework for her narrative Desai's critical approach is enthralling. The examination of the ways generations have literally inherited the losses of colonization is at the crux of the novel. Brilliantly written through the nuanced perspective of a multitude of characters. My one reservation may be that The Inheritance of Loss too easily engages in a dependency theory-esque portrayal of the world along core-periphery, empowered-disempowered lines without looking more at the ways this picture is shifting and complex. Nevertheless, her indictment of liberal celebrations of globalization, as a backdrop for her narrative, is scathing and well crafted.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on November 9, 2008
An enigmatic beauty suffuses this book. As others have noted, it is not a conventionally-plotted story arc, but a set of portraits of those who have accepted subjugation (and paid with their souls), those with a glimmering consciousness of that price, and those yearning for the good "Western" life, riding the coattails of the global economy. The characters meet, interlock, separate, and in between are passages of intensity, comedy, philosphy and a bit of slapstick.

Rarely has the political been presented so personally, in aching passages leavened with sly wit. I'd call this book a near-masterpiece.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on September 27, 2007
I am glad I picked this book to amongst those to read this month. I enjoyed it from the start to finish. An appealing setting, fast pace and fascinating characters made me to read it the second time.It features with titles like The Usurper and Others, Good Earth,Bookseller of Kabul as culturally distinct books that I enjoyed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 8, 2006
I am glad I picked this book to amongst those to read this month. I enjoyed it from the start to finish. An appealing setting, fast pace and fascinating characters made me to read it the second time.It features with titles like The Usurper and Others, Good Earth,Bookseller of Kabul as culturally distinct books that I enjoyed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 3, 2013
When I purchased this book, it said "Used Item" . I was first skeptical, but then I went to the reviews and so that everybody seemed to be satisfied. So, I decided to give it a go and purchased this item. I received it and guess what it was in excellent condition !!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 24, 2007
I received this book from a friend who handed it to me and simply said, "read it." I did, and I'm glad I did. The book is set in India, in the 1980s and deals with the Nepalese movement and their fight to become an independent state. Now, that might sound boring, but it's not. Desai has a way with words, to say the least, and the plot unfolds with great characters, the best of which is Jemubhai Popatlal. He's a retired judge who was educated at Cambridge and now lives with his orphaned granddaughter and cook. The "nuclear family" makes for the basis of movement in this book. Exile, family problems, and a search to better oneself all take up space in this brilliant novel. Would also recommend the novels "Da Vinci Code" "Time Traveler's Wife" and "Middlesex."
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2007
I enjoyed this book from the start till the end and I am glad I picked if for my reading. The setting is appealing setting, the caracters are fascinating and the pase is fast
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The God of Small Things: A Novel
The God of Small Things: A Novel by Arundhati Roy (Paperback - June 1 1998)
CDN$ 16.69

The White Tiger: A Novel
The White Tiger: A Novel by Aravind Adiga (Paperback - Oct. 14 2008)
CDN$ 12.41