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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Borrowers
I've always loved this book, ever since I read it in fourth grade; the thought of little people always appealed to me. The style the book is written in is sort of old-fashioned for today's readers, but if a person can read it, then I definitely recommend it.
It's about a type of people, Borrowers, that are very tiny. They live in houses and 'borrow' things, like...
Published on July 10 2004 by Theatre Kidd

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3.0 out of 5 stars Story Student
The Borrowers is a really good book. Borrowers are little people who live in the bottom of peoples houses and borrow their things. There is a family called the Clocks. There are worried and lonely for other Borrowers! Are there any borrowers left in the world? On day they go out, and they try to find any other Borrowers. Then they run into a cat! The cat grabs Mrs...
Published on Feb. 26 2004


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Borrowers, July 10 2004
This review is from: The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
I've always loved this book, ever since I read it in fourth grade; the thought of little people always appealed to me. The style the book is written in is sort of old-fashioned for today's readers, but if a person can read it, then I definitely recommend it.
It's about a type of people, Borrowers, that are very tiny. They live in houses and 'borrow' things, like food, paper, and basically anything that they can get their hands on. They picture people as giants that are put on this earth to make things for them to 'borrow'... They live under floor-boards, behind pictures, over mantles; basically anywhere. That's how Arrietty's mother and father tell it.
But, in all reality, there is only herself, her mother, and her father left in that one particular house. Every other Borrower family had emigrated to somewhere else... and Arrietty accepts that until one day she is seen by a boy that puts the thought into her head that maybe her family is the last of the Borrowers.
And that's really how it all starts. Arrietty and the Boy form a sort of friendship, where the boy takes a letter to the place where Arrietty's Uncle is supposed to live, and Arrietty reads to him. (The Boy says that he's bilingual, and that's the reason that he can't read well.) And taking the mail isn't the only thing that the Boy does- he also brings the Clocks furniture, food, and other things.
Things which are discovered missing later.
And that brings in the cat and the rat-catchers...
One of my favorite childrens' books; I think the reason I like it so much is that it doesn't take for granted that kids wouldn't be able to understand a longer book... I think that's also what I love about the Harry Potter books, as well.
Anyway, read this. Very sweet, very family friendly. Altogether enjoyable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Borrowers - a many layered classic, March 28 1998
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
The Borrowers is a book for losers. Not the modern kind of loser, but people like me who are always losing stamps and pins and pens. The book tells the story of Arrietty Clock and her parents, tiny people who live beneath the floor of an old house and `borrow' the things they need from the humans who live in the house above. A postage stamp becomes a painting for their wall, pins become knitting needles. Even Arrietty's parents' names - Pod and Homily - are borrowed.
Life has never been easy for the borrowers, but now times are changing for the worse. The Sink family in the scullery, the Broom Cupboards, the Rain-Pipes and even Uncle Hendreary and his family have emigrated. Only the Clock family remain, living in fear of Mrs Driver, the housekeeper upstairs. When Pod comes home and says that a boy is living upstairs and that the boy has `seen' him, Pod's wife, Homily, is thrown into panic.

Arrietty, however, is intrigued. While her parents cling to the dubious safety of the life they know, Arrietty wonders about the world outside and dreams of adventure. She persuades her reluctant parents to let her accompany her father on his borrowing expeditions. On her first venture out, she meets the boy upstairs. A dangerous friendship develops. Meanwhile, Mrs Driver stalks the borrowers, full of the sort of cruelty Roald Dahl would have been proud to create. It is only with the boy's help that Arrietty and her parents narrowly escape Mrs Driver's attempts to destroy them. At the end of the book, Arrietty faces the dangerous adventure of emigration.

Like all great books for the young, The Borrowers can be read as an enthralling story of adventure, but also contains many layers of meaning. Mary Norton's creation of the tiny race of borrowers is an imaginative achievement in itself, but she does not stop there. She gives poignance to her tale by telling it through the voice of the boy's sister, now an old lady, who tells us at the start that her brother has long since grown up and died a `hero's de!ath' on the North-West frontier. The old lady seems to believe her brother's tale of the borrowers, and yet at the end of the book she provides evidence to suggest that the borrowers may have been nothing but a product of her brother's imagination. The reader is left wondering about reality and truth. On another level, in the relationship between the borrowers and the human world, parallels with the misunderstandings and confusions which occur between different cultures can be discerned. The uncertainties the borrowers face and their final exile mirror the plight of our world's increasing number of displaced people. Long after the book is finished, the characters and the questions their story raises reverberate around the mind. The Borrowers is a book which will fascinate, intrigue and entertain.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A slow starter but good book all around, March 10 2004
By A Customer
This book is the second book in a series by Mary Norton about little people who borrow what they need to survive from humans.The borrowers from book one are Arrietty, Homily and Pod. They continue their story in this sequel. In this book other borrowers are introduced. These include Spiller, Uncle Hendreary, Eggletina(one of Arrietty's three cousins) and Aunt Lupy.
In the beginning, I found this book to somewhat boring. It was a narrative from a human called Kate. She was the girl who learned of this story in book one. She and her Great Aunt Sophie travel from their home in the city to the country where Great Aunt Sophie inherited a cottage. This cottage is near where the borrowers story started. There was a complication however. It seemed that someone else lived in that same cottage. This man was now old. He lived there in the cottage for 80 years. Kate and Great Aunt Sophie want to find out if the story of the borrowers is real or not. Old Tom Goodenough is the man who lived in the cottage. He was also the young man in the original story who was brought in to use his ferret to try to get the borrowers out of the house. He remembers the borrowers. He had Arrietty's diary and let Kate read it. The book then flashes back to the actual time when Arreitty, Homily and Pod are escaping from the big house and trying to survive in their new world.
They had to try to find the Badger Set where they think other family mambers are living. This is the story of their journey. Arrietty, Homily and Pod find an old boot and decide that it would be their sleeping area. They had to drag it with them during the day, while they looked for the badger set. You could say this was an early camping trailer. They had a hard time finding the badger set, and decided to secure the boot under a stumps root and use it as a permanent home. Arrietty met Spiller who helped them. He supplied them with meat, tea, candles and a lot of other things. Spiller would borrow these items from a number of souces. He used a tin soap box for a boat and floated up and down the stream. Things were going well and then the frost came and then the first snow. They ran out of food and had to rely only on some wine that Spiller gave them. They got drunk and forgot to cover their entrance and a gypsy who was the owner of the boot, found it and took it home. Arrietty, Homily and Pod were still in the boot!
This is where the book gets really good. I won't ruin the surprise of this books ending for you.
I found this book a little hard to get into at first. I wish Mary Norton could have gotten to the plot line quicker. I like to read about how they survived and what they used to survive. Once I got into the main part of the book, I could not stop easily. It was suspensful. I wonder if Mary Norton will allow us to be introduced to other borrowers and further the story line with Arrietty, Homily and Pod. I like these characters and want to find out what will happen to them. I guess I will have to continue and read the rest of this series. Maybe you will hear from me in a review of The Borrowers Afloat.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best Children's story Ever!, July 21 2001
By 
Alphia D. Larkins "mimi3plus3" (Acworth, Georgia United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
I cannot think of any children's book more delightful to read to one's children than this book. Actually, the whole series is wonderful. When my son was small, probably 7 or 8 years old, (he is 35 now, in fact had his 35th birthday today!) I read the whole series to him, and it took several weeks, reading to him at bedtime each night, to read all of them, but it was a wonderful "bonding time" for us, though that term had not been invented then, but I knew that it helped forge a special bond between my son and myself. It conveyed my love of books and of reading to him, a past time that he enjoys to the present. We could not wait for bedtime each night to see what new adventure Pod and Arrietty would undertake, with poor Homily waiting nervously at home for them. In a later edition Spiller appears, then it really gets interesting, as Spiller is definitely a free spirit, and a perfect friend for Arrietty. Their adventures are really "edge of the seat" suspense! This may seem tame next to Star Wars or Harry Potter, but believe me, you get so engrossed in the every day struggles of these tiny people just trying to survive, and who are so much like the human "beans" they are so in fear and awe of, it is not tame or boring at all. I would give it a "10" in great adventure stories! I am a great grand mother now, but I still love "The Borrowers" and all the sequels."The Borrowers Afield" is the second in the series, and even better than the first! "The Borrowers Afloat" comes next, and it is just as wonderful and gets the tiny family into even more shenanigans out of doors, this time floating down the river in Spiller's "boat." These books are for everyone, child and adult alike. There are a couple of more in the series, the fourth is "Borrowers Aloft," so called because they are held prisoner in an attic and have no one but themselves to rely on to escape, so have to be very inventive and clever to devise a means of escape. The solution they come up with will boggle your mind and amaze you at the ingenuity of the human spirit and what it can accomplish when it has to, because these "little people" embody the pioneer spirit of our ancestors. It may be the best of all the books, but they are each so unique and so wonderful, it is hard to say one is better than another. Each one has it's own charm, and each adventure is different. Mary Norton had a very magical way of looking at things and a unique imagination evidently, to write these wonderful stories. A must for all children, and best if read with a parent, as all books are when you are young. It was a special time for my son and I, and the memory will be with him all his life, long after I am no longer with him. These books are heirlooms in my home!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A story that I'll always remember... and love..., July 27 2000
By 
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
I first read this book 10 years ago when I was still in Primary School and I instantly became a fan. I still remember that it was my home tutor , Ms Sim, who introduced me to this book. Now 10 years later, I re-read this book and still love it. I feel that anyone and everyone can enjoy this book, not only the kids.
The Borrowers are actually a race of little people. They believed that the human 'beans' lived to provide for them. The Borrowers loved houses that were very organised. The residents of the house must always follow a pattern of behavior so that the Borrowers could 'borrow' things from the house without being 'seen'.
"The Borrowers" tells the story of a Borrower family - the Clocks. They were Pod and Homily Clock and their 13 years old daughter, Arrietty. Why were they called the Clocks? The reason was simple enough. It's because this particular Borrower family lived under the kitchen floor but the entrance to their home was behind the old grandfather clock. So the last name of a Borrower could be anything, depending on where they lived. There were the Overmantels, the Rain-Barrels, the Bell-Pulls, the John Studdingtons (they lived behind the picture of John Studdington), the Boot-Racks and so on... The Borrowers loved to live a long way off from the entrance to their home.
Arrietty was a curious girl who had dreamed of going out to see the world other than the world under the kitchen. One day, her father agreed to let her go 'borrowing' with him. One that day, she was 'seen' by a boy (a human 'bean' boy) who had gone to lived in that house because he was unwell and needed time to recover. The boy has assisted the Clocks with their 'borrowings' later on. But good things are always not meant to be forever... Things started to happen, creating chaos in the lives of the Clocks.
When I read this book last time, I was sad that the boy didn't see the Borrowers again and I wanted to know what happened after this book. I didn't know that there were sequels to this book then. A couple of days ago, I found the sequels to "The Borrowers" and I can't wait to read them. I really feel that "The Borrowers" has an interesting and orginal storyline that can be enjoyed by all.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but check out the age level, June 14 2000
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
When I was a child of 12 or 13, I loved the Borrowers books. The idea of a family of tiny people, living in my own house and taking, for the most practical of purposes, things we'd thought we'd lost was quite enjoyable. The best part of the books, for me, were the descriptions of what they did with the buttons and baubles they risked their lives to 'borrow' - (imagine bumping into our family cat late one night while you're trying to lug a teacup back home).
Because I was a young girl who thought girls could do anything, I didn't really appreciate Arrietty's spunkiness. As the only child of the last Borrowers in this household, she's allowed to do many things her own mother hadn't done as a child. And perhaps because she can do some things her mother couldn't, she moves a step further and does whatever any boy could do.
I thought I could read these books to my 8 year old, who loves the Harry Potter series and The Wrinkle in Time books, but these books are too difficult for little kids (even those reading at an advanced level).
The language is very British and there are side explanations that are much too lengthy. Evidently I missed, as a pre-teen reader, the notion that the Borrowers might have been fabricated by the boy who was narrating the stories. (It is rather absurd to think that they were made up - I've lost too many socks and earrings in my lifetime, so I know Borrowers exist.)
Before the John Goodman version of the movie, we watched British video of The Borrowers and The Return of the Borrowers (great for younger kids). It was excellent, even though the special effects aren't where they were in the American version, the British version was excellent.
For those 11 and up (to 111) this is a great series to read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Family Tradition, March 29 1998
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
Every family has certain traditions which are passed down lovingly from generation to generation. For our family, THE BORROWERS is one such tradition. My mother first enjoyed this book as a young girl in the 1950's, reading away rainy winter afternoons in the hayloft. In the 1970's she shared this book, as well as it's sequels, THE BORROWERS AFIELD, THE BORROWERS AFLOAT,and THE BORROWERS ALOFT, with me. I loved it so much I spent hours building miniature villages out of odds and ends just in case any Borrowers should decide to move in with me. Every time someone in our house lost some small item like a pin or a key we'd say, "The Borrowers took it!" Now, with the premier of the movie version, a third generation of our family has had the opportunity to meet the tiny Clock family. My son and I enjoyed the movie so much we rushed right out and bought a copy of the book to read together. It was wonderful to see him transported to that same exciting miniature world I had enjoyed as a child. He was enthralled as Arietty and the human boy encountered one mishap after another in their quest to keep the Borrowers home a secret from unfriendly adults. Traditions are the glue which bonds the generations together in a family. Pick up a copy of this timeless classic and start a family tradition with your child today!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Household Mysteries Solved, March 24 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
Every house is filled with mysteries: What is that noise at night? Why is the living room always so cold? And where do all those second socks and extra paperclips go? Well, this book may not explain the first two phenomena (although it might), but the last will certainly be solved!
The Borrowers are a race of tiny people who live in various places around the house. They might live under the sink, behind the cupboard, above the mantle, or in any number of other places. They live off of humans (or "beings"), much in the way mice do. Except that Borrowers don't take food and the staples of an affluent life - they borrow them! No, this does not mean that you'll get them back - but doesn't it sound better than stealing?
The Borrowers is about a family of these little people, the Clocks by name, who are the only remaining Borrowers in a great house. The borrowings are getting slimmer, and life is getting duller. Poor 13 year old Arrietty is bored to tears. Her parents are overprotective and will not let her out of their "house". So Arrietty sets off to make her own fun - and ends up endangering the family's very exsistence.
While nominally a children's book, The Borrowers holds great appeal for just about everyone. Its fascinating premise draws us in, and makes us aware that we may very well share our home with such creatures as Borrowers - and that maybe all of those lost socks are being put to a good use.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fun, fantasy and adventure, March 25 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
The Borrowers is one of my favorite read-alouds. I have enjoyed reading it to each of my 4 children at various times and it has also been fun for them to re-read when they became fluent readers. The reader enters into a fantasy world that becomes almost believable as the story continues. One identifies with the "little people", Pod, Homily and Arrietty, especially Arrietty, who is not content to just hide, but wants to explore and finds adventure in the form of a "human bean" (a regular sized boy) with whom she develops a friendship. This is a big no-no in the world of the Borrowers, and children identify with a little child-person who is doing what she shouldn't. I highly recommend this as a bed-time story, for most ages, as soon as they are old enough to cuddle up and listen.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A delightful view of life from a tiny person's point of view, March 30 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
This book is a must for all kids and pre-teens who enjoy a suspense-filled, fun-packed, fantasy. Living at the size of a toothpick isnt easy, but it sure is fun! The borrowers draw their readers into an amazing, wonderful world as they go through each of their adventures. When reading about how the tiny people "Borrow" household items and turn them into amazing things, its impossible to not be so absorbed that you almost feel 2 inches tall! Throughout the whole book, I was always awaiting the Borrowers next move, and when it ended, I wanted MORE! I recommend this book to anyone young or old who wants to read an enjoyable, wonderful story about survival in a completely different, yet the same, world. I ensure you that it is wonderful, and will be all-around loved by everyone in the family.
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The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition
The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition by Mary Norton (Paperback - March 30 2003)
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