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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars childhood revisited
I read this in school when i was 10. i loved it then, and reading it again was almost as good as the first time. Just a funny, amusing little book that provokes different emotions. Great family book.
Published 18 months ago by Janet Graham

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Story Student
The Borrowers is a really good book. Borrowers are little people who live in the bottom of peoples houses and borrow their things. There is a family called the Clocks. There are worried and lonely for other Borrowers! Are there any borrowers left in the world? On day they go out, and they try to find any other Borrowers. Then they run into a cat! The cat grabs Mrs...
Published on Feb. 26 2004


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars childhood revisited, Jan. 6 2013
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This review is from: The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
I read this in school when i was 10. i loved it then, and reading it again was almost as good as the first time. Just a funny, amusing little book that provokes different emotions. Great family book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Borrowers, July 10 2004
This review is from: The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
I've always loved this book, ever since I read it in fourth grade; the thought of little people always appealed to me. The style the book is written in is sort of old-fashioned for today's readers, but if a person can read it, then I definitely recommend it.
It's about a type of people, Borrowers, that are very tiny. They live in houses and 'borrow' things, like food, paper, and basically anything that they can get their hands on. They picture people as giants that are put on this earth to make things for them to 'borrow'... They live under floor-boards, behind pictures, over mantles; basically anywhere. That's how Arrietty's mother and father tell it.
But, in all reality, there is only herself, her mother, and her father left in that one particular house. Every other Borrower family had emigrated to somewhere else... and Arrietty accepts that until one day she is seen by a boy that puts the thought into her head that maybe her family is the last of the Borrowers.
And that's really how it all starts. Arrietty and the Boy form a sort of friendship, where the boy takes a letter to the place where Arrietty's Uncle is supposed to live, and Arrietty reads to him. (The Boy says that he's bilingual, and that's the reason that he can't read well.) And taking the mail isn't the only thing that the Boy does- he also brings the Clocks furniture, food, and other things.
Things which are discovered missing later.
And that brings in the cat and the rat-catchers...
One of my favorite childrens' books; I think the reason I like it so much is that it doesn't take for granted that kids wouldn't be able to understand a longer book... I think that's also what I love about the Harry Potter books, as well.
Anyway, read this. Very sweet, very family friendly. Altogether enjoyable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Borrowers - a many layered classic, March 28 1998
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
The Borrowers is a book for losers. Not the modern kind of loser, but people like me who are always losing stamps and pins and pens. The book tells the story of Arrietty Clock and her parents, tiny people who live beneath the floor of an old house and `borrow' the things they need from the humans who live in the house above. A postage stamp becomes a painting for their wall, pins become knitting needles. Even Arrietty's parents' names - Pod and Homily - are borrowed.
Life has never been easy for the borrowers, but now times are changing for the worse. The Sink family in the scullery, the Broom Cupboards, the Rain-Pipes and even Uncle Hendreary and his family have emigrated. Only the Clock family remain, living in fear of Mrs Driver, the housekeeper upstairs. When Pod comes home and says that a boy is living upstairs and that the boy has `seen' him, Pod's wife, Homily, is thrown into panic.

Arrietty, however, is intrigued. While her parents cling to the dubious safety of the life they know, Arrietty wonders about the world outside and dreams of adventure. She persuades her reluctant parents to let her accompany her father on his borrowing expeditions. On her first venture out, she meets the boy upstairs. A dangerous friendship develops. Meanwhile, Mrs Driver stalks the borrowers, full of the sort of cruelty Roald Dahl would have been proud to create. It is only with the boy's help that Arrietty and her parents narrowly escape Mrs Driver's attempts to destroy them. At the end of the book, Arrietty faces the dangerous adventure of emigration.

Like all great books for the young, The Borrowers can be read as an enthralling story of adventure, but also contains many layers of meaning. Mary Norton's creation of the tiny race of borrowers is an imaginative achievement in itself, but she does not stop there. She gives poignance to her tale by telling it through the voice of the boy's sister, now an old lady, who tells us at the start that her brother has long since grown up and died a `hero's de!ath' on the North-West frontier. The old lady seems to believe her brother's tale of the borrowers, and yet at the end of the book she provides evidence to suggest that the borrowers may have been nothing but a product of her brother's imagination. The reader is left wondering about reality and truth. On another level, in the relationship between the borrowers and the human world, parallels with the misunderstandings and confusions which occur between different cultures can be discerned. The uncertainties the borrowers face and their final exile mirror the plight of our world's increasing number of displaced people. Long after the book is finished, the characters and the questions their story raises reverberate around the mind. The Borrowers is a book which will fascinate, intrigue and entertain.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great for kids (and adults), Feb. 4 2014
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This review is from: The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
I first learned of this book from the Ghibli movie "The Secret World of Arrietty" (from which this book is based on), so I was curious to see what it was like (Howl's Moving Castle turned out to be fantastic, and introduced me to Diana Wynne Jones!). The idea of Borrowers is so clever, and the book was a nice and easy read. I think this would be a great book to get a child's imagination going! I enjoyed reading the story, and can only imagine what my childhood would be like if I had read this book then.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A slow starter but good book all around, March 10 2004
By A Customer
This book is the second book in a series by Mary Norton about little people who borrow what they need to survive from humans.The borrowers from book one are Arrietty, Homily and Pod. They continue their story in this sequel. In this book other borrowers are introduced. These include Spiller, Uncle Hendreary, Eggletina(one of Arrietty's three cousins) and Aunt Lupy.
In the beginning, I found this book to somewhat boring. It was a narrative from a human called Kate. She was the girl who learned of this story in book one. She and her Great Aunt Sophie travel from their home in the city to the country where Great Aunt Sophie inherited a cottage. This cottage is near where the borrowers story started. There was a complication however. It seemed that someone else lived in that same cottage. This man was now old. He lived there in the cottage for 80 years. Kate and Great Aunt Sophie want to find out if the story of the borrowers is real or not. Old Tom Goodenough is the man who lived in the cottage. He was also the young man in the original story who was brought in to use his ferret to try to get the borrowers out of the house. He remembers the borrowers. He had Arrietty's diary and let Kate read it. The book then flashes back to the actual time when Arreitty, Homily and Pod are escaping from the big house and trying to survive in their new world.
They had to try to find the Badger Set where they think other family mambers are living. This is the story of their journey. Arrietty, Homily and Pod find an old boot and decide that it would be their sleeping area. They had to drag it with them during the day, while they looked for the badger set. You could say this was an early camping trailer. They had a hard time finding the badger set, and decided to secure the boot under a stumps root and use it as a permanent home. Arrietty met Spiller who helped them. He supplied them with meat, tea, candles and a lot of other things. Spiller would borrow these items from a number of souces. He used a tin soap box for a boat and floated up and down the stream. Things were going well and then the frost came and then the first snow. They ran out of food and had to rely only on some wine that Spiller gave them. They got drunk and forgot to cover their entrance and a gypsy who was the owner of the boot, found it and took it home. Arrietty, Homily and Pod were still in the boot!
This is where the book gets really good. I won't ruin the surprise of this books ending for you.
I found this book a little hard to get into at first. I wish Mary Norton could have gotten to the plot line quicker. I like to read about how they survived and what they used to survive. Once I got into the main part of the book, I could not stop easily. It was suspensful. I wonder if Mary Norton will allow us to be introduced to other borrowers and further the story line with Arrietty, Homily and Pod. I like these characters and want to find out what will happen to them. I guess I will have to continue and read the rest of this series. Maybe you will hear from me in a review of The Borrowers Afloat.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Story Student, Feb. 26 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
The Borrowers is a really good book. Borrowers are little people who live in the bottom of peoples houses and borrow their things. There is a family called the Clocks. There are worried and lonely for other Borrowers! Are there any borrowers left in the world? On day they go out, and they try to find any other Borrowers. Then they run into a cat! The cat grabs Mrs. Clock, and I recommend this book for all its joy and charm, and the author wrote this book for the short people of the world.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A very old fashioned , but well written book, Nov. 6 2003
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Attorney momma (council bluffs, iowa United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
This yarn takes place under the kitchen floor of a house where no human child has lived in a very long time.The book begins when a lady named Mrs. May is telling a girl, Kate, about the world of the "Borrowers." From a borrowers' point of view humans are as large as giants. The human "beans," have not seen borrowers since the time of one in particular named Egglantina as it is disastrous to be seen by a human.Borrowers borrow such things as spools for seats,and even borrow names as you will see. The most interesting idea in the book was that Mary Norton wrote about a species that is a logical impossibility.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Enduring Classic- The Beginning of a Wonderful Series!, Feb. 19 2003
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This review is from: The Borrowers (Paperback)
A must read for all early and middle grade readers. A charming and delightful story of "imaginary little people" who live under the floorboards of big people's homes. Adventures and delightful escapades enjoyable to children! Highly recommended.
Evelyn Horan -
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4.0 out of 5 stars little people rock, March 25 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
this book is a awesome book because it has little pwople about six inches tall who live under a grandfather clock and they live buy borrowing things from humans like thumb pins and thumb needels
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5.0 out of 5 stars Little People, March 12 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Borrowers (Hardcover)
This book is a great intertaining book about little miniture people called the barrowers. Find out about the amazing lives this fantastic book. With creative pictures such as a pocket watch as a grandfather clock. This is a must buy.
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The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition
The Borrowers: 50th Anniversary Edition by Mary Norton (Paperback - March 30 2003)
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