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5.0 out of 5 stars Bloody Jack
I thought it was a really,really good book, and i have read many. i almost didnt want it to end. Its about an orphan girl who, after the tradjic death of her beloved Chalie, the leader of the gang of orphans she lived with,escapes this hard unforgiving life by disguising herself as a boy to get a spot on the navel ship The Dolphin. There she gets good, constant meals for...
Published on April 29 2004 by marcine

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars TItanic, pirate style.
This is a nice little story about a girl who disguses herself as a boy. How very orthodox. I didn't especially like it, but then again maybe you will. They focus on her obsession with her bunk mate a little too much, instead of kicking pirate butt, which was what I expected from the summary. It was pretty predictable, but it gave you a little "haha" once or twice...
Published on June 21 2004


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5.0 out of 5 stars Bloody Jack, April 29 2004
By 
marcine (New Paltz,NY,USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bloody Jack (Hardcover)
I thought it was a really,really good book, and i have read many. i almost didnt want it to end. Its about an orphan girl who, after the tradjic death of her beloved Chalie, the leader of the gang of orphans she lived with,escapes this hard unforgiving life by disguising herself as a boy to get a spot on the navel ship The Dolphin. There she gets good, constant meals for the first time in her life and forms a close friendship with the other ship's boys. She puts up with the trials of being a ship's boy such as the beatings of an evil middshippman,and the sexual harrassment of another evil shipmate.This is along with the many obsticals she faces to conseal her true identity which include her changing body and her feminity which even (gasp) makes her shipmates suspect her of being queer. But there are many wonederful things about her new life such as Jaimy, the ship's boy she falls in love with, and the thrill of chasing down and fighting pirates. I can't even describe how wonderfull this book really is.i thought at first it would be just another pirate book but i was woderfully wrong.I would recomend it to anyone who loves a good action packed book with a side of heart racing romance. it made me laugh out loud and cry, and any book that can do that is well worth the time.READ IT! It wont let you down.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous seagoing adventure story, Feb. 2 2003
By 
Ruth Nelson (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bloody Jack (Hardcover)
Bloody Jack is, without any doubt, the best kid's book I've read since the last Harry Potter. In fact, it holds its own with Harry. It is told by its heroine - a 12 year old girl named Mary Faber who was abandonned on the streets of early 19th century London when her parents died of fever. She tells how she was taken in by a street gang where she gets tough and street wise for five years. At the start of the book, the gang leader is killed. She figures her chances are better as a boy so she cuts off her hair, changes her name to Jacky, and makes her way to the docks where she talks her way on board a British Navy vessel because she can read.
She is one of six cabin boys - mostly street kids who are thrilled to have a chance to eat regularly. They can't believe their luck to be paid as well. During their three year voyage - a mission to chase down pirates, they learn to climb rigging, work as powder monkeys in sea battles with pirates, do all kinds of work on deck and hope to improve their lot by becoming able-bodied seamen and regular members of the crew.
At the same, Jacky has to figure out how to keep her secret while her breasts are developing and she starts her period. She also develops a serious crush on the oldest of the cabin boys - a quiet lad who is the younger son of a real family.
In the process she has all kinds of adventures. The crew battles pirates. (She gets her nickname from shooting a pirate during a battle.) The boys have to learn to handle the discipline of the British Navy where they are junior to everyone including the 14 year old midshipmen - one of whom is a complete bully. They get shore leave in exotic ports like Jamaica. Their conversations about religion and education as they puzzle out the ways of the world are hilariously funny.
Jacky has to use all her ingenuity to keep her secret and survive on board ship. She is courageous, smart, strong and a natural born leader. And she has a sharp, funny voice of her own that tells the story in the manner of a girl who has learned to express herself from London street talk, ballads, newspapers and cheap novels.
One of the best aspects of the book is its portrayal of an adventurous girl who likes being a girl - not a girl who has always wanted to be a boy. There are too many stories where femininity is a synonym for weakness and the girl prevails by adopting male behavior. Not this one.
Jacky acts like herself and - because everyone THINKS she's a boy, they simply deal with it. She likes to sew and decides to make herself a uniform when she starts growing out of her clothes. Do the officers and crew think she is a weak sissy? Nope. Sailors had to sew. The captain issues her more fabric and gives her the job of outfitting the rest of the cabin boys.
In one of the battles, the ship takes a cannon shot that blasts a hole in the side of the vessel. The whole crew is put to manning the pumps. Jacky simply doesn't have the strength to manage. Is this a problem? Nope. Some boys are smaller than others, so they send her up to the top of the rigging because she is smaller and lighter and can get a better view farther up.
In fact, there is no problem with her being a girl - until they discover she is a girl. This is a subtly political point which Meyer makes over and over again - but without preaching or politics. Instead he has created a brilliant character and put her in a hugely entertaining tale and lets the story speak for itself.
This is a fabulous book. Don't start it late at night. You won't want to put it down until you are finished.
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1.0 out of 5 stars TItanic, pirate style., June 21 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloody Jack (Hardcover)
This is a nice little story about a girl who disguses herself as a boy. How very orthodox. I didn't especially like it, but then again maybe you will. They focus on her obsession with her bunk mate a little too much, instead of kicking pirate butt, which was what I expected from the summary. It was pretty predictable, but it gave you a little "haha" once or twice. The writing itself was ok, but as I am not learned in british slang from the 1680s, it was a little difficult to understand what the protagonist ment. It was a book I could put down and forget about until i stepped on it. I read it, and would suggest this book for girls. It may seem like a "boys" book from the cover, something like Stowaway, but a boy might not enjoy reading it. It was no Da Vinci code, and was about 8 levels down from the writing quality of Harry Potter, but if you really have nothing to do, check a book out from the library and keep this one on the shelf.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Finally, Horatio Hornblower and Captain Blood for girls!, March 24 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloody Jack (Hardcover)
This is an excellent book. It is especially valuable as it presents a capable, resourceful GIRL as the main character in a marvelous swashbuckling adventure. It is well written, although the mild 19th century street cant and nautical terms might present a stumbling block for younger readers with limited vocabularies. These kids should slog their way through the book anyway, because the read is great fun and certainly worth a trip or two to the dictionary. This is the sort of book that helps young girls develop and maintain self-esteem, and helps young boys realize that girls are more like them than they might have expected . . . Bravo to Mr. Meyer for showing us in the best way possible that gender stereotypes are for the birds.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bloody Jack, Feb. 24 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloody Jack (Hardcover)
This book is a very, very good book. It is about this girl named Mary and the girl wanted to be sailor. She wanted to be a sailor. People on a ship came and took her family away because they where very sick and they had to be moved away from people and they had to go get treatment. They had to go get treatment because they where very, very sick. She wants to find love and her loving family to see if they are alive. She changes her self-Just so she could live her life the way she wanted. She changed her self into a boy so she could make it as a sailor. But in the end love always wins!!!!! I would recommend this book because it was an adventurous good book that I would read again if I could.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bloody Jack, Feb. 13 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloody Jack (Hardcover)
This book is a very, very good book. It is about this girl named Mary and the girl wanted to be sailor. She wanted to be a sailor. People on a ship came and took her family away because they where very sick and they had to be moved away from people and they had to go get treatment. They had to go get treatment because they where very, very sick. She wants to find love and her loving family to see if they are alive. She changes her self-Just so she could live her life the way she wanted. She changed her self into a boy so she could make it as a sailor. But in the end love always wins!!!!! I would recommend this book because it was an adventurous good book that I would read again if I could.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Finally, a book worth reading, July 8 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloody Jack: Being an Account Of the Curious Adventures Of Mary "Jacky" Faber, Ship`s Boy (Paperback)
As a teenager, I have read numerous books about the same subject. While you read them, they all blend into one another and end the same way, and have no surpises in the plot at all. When I picked up a copy of Mr. Meyer's book, I thought the same about it while i read the summary. To my surprise i was enchanted while reading the first pages. Not only is the story rich with wonderful characters and dialogue, it is filled with sea-faring adventure, romance and humor. I have been told that teenage boys do not appreciate this story, but I am a male, and it is now one of my favorites.If books were money, this one would be gold. Mr. Meyer, I applaud you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars RIP ROARING ADVENTURE ON THE HIGH SEAS!, Feb. 1 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloody Jack: Being an Account Of the Curious Adventures Of Mary "Jacky" Faber, Ship`s Boy (Paperback)
I loved this book! For me, a teenaged girl sailboat sailor, it appealed to me a lot. Most of the sea faring novels out there for teens are about boys and such. This one was narrarated by Jacky Faber, with her british street talk, which added a lot of charm to the book. I thought it was very well written and I really liked it and I am now reading the second novel in this series, the curse of the blue tatoo... not sure yet if i like it as much as the first, as the first was so good. Adults also wold like this novel, as I know many of them who have read it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Late Night Read, June 24 2003
By 
Brandi (Tallahassee, FL) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bloody Jack (Hardcover)
One of the best books I've read all year! I was blown away with how hooked I got. One recomendation I do have is that you should not start reading this book late at night. I just couldn't put it down. I found myself reading this book all the way through the night. Everytime I had to put the book down to do something like sleep, I was left in complete suspense for what happens next. This book is intriguing and keeps you wanting more. This book is a wonderful read and I believe it will be exciting for any gender and all ages.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, Well written book, Oct. 16 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloody Jack: Being an Account Of the Curious Adventures Of Mary "Jacky" Faber, Ship`s Boy (Paperback)
I think this is an amazing book though not yet done, It is written through the eyes of Mary and she is depicted well even through the writing (The bed grammar of an orphan). The characters are well laid out and there is a bit of what you want although this is DEFINITLEY a book for younger children. It shows the growth of a 18th century orphan girl trying to make her life better through all of lifes problems(argh puberty)
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