Customer Reviews


35 Reviews
5 star:
 (22)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Much Ado About Theatre
Shakespeare's, Much Ado About Nothing, was cleverly composed and delivered in his Old English style of dialogue. It is excellent reading not only for teachers and parents, but also for students as well. I enjoyed the Dover Thrift edition because it is unabridged from the original text and it is exceedingly important to read versions that are as close to the original as...
Published on Nov. 16 2003 by M. Burdin

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars much ado about nothing
I thought Much Ado About Nothing made no sense really because it seemed shorter than Antigone, and there was a little too much love going on. I couldn't handle it all, especially the deception by Don John. The first love between Claudio and Hero were like two teenagers in puppy love, and Benedick and Beatrice who had crazy love, which means that they liked each other, but...
Published on Nov. 20 2003 by robert jepsky


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3.0 out of 5 stars much ado about nothing, Nov. 20 2003
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
I thought Much Ado About Nothing made no sense really because it seemed shorter than Antigone, and there was a little too much love going on. I couldn't handle it all, especially the deception by Don John. The first love between Claudio and Hero were like two teenagers in puppy love, and Benedick and Beatrice who had crazy love, which means that they liked each other, but didn't confess about their feelings.
William Shakespeare's main purpose was I think showing what kind of loves there were through different types of people. The first of which is Claudio, the desperate type only looking for a girl to look cool. Whenever Don John told Claudio a lie, he would get all mad and act like he could never forgive Hero. He would whine like a little girl. I think the purpose didn't really click into to me because I am too young and don't understand love.
What I have personally learned from this is to not rush into love because even though Don John made up those lies and false judgments about Hero, those could really happen in real life, plus the fact that we are two young to understand it. We get into that high school puppy love which isn't the same as real love. When we are older we will understand because we will be at that stage where all of us will understand the true meaning of love.
I would not recommend this book because I think it had really no point but to show us what kind of loves there are and, how we should treat them with the person we love. The comedy in this was really good, but in this book, I didn't see the mix of comedy and love.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The piece that made me feel like dancing, Nov. 20 2003
By 
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
I thought that the play "Much Ado about Nothing" was a very positive and a enjoyable play to read. Shakespeare's main point in the play is that Love makes you act weird. In the play when Benidick over heard Don Jon, Claudio, and Leonato in the garden giving the illusion that Beatrice was in love with him you saw his true feelings come out of him that you thought you would never see. Beatrice and Benidick fight like cats and Dogs but as soon as Benidick overheard that Beatrice was in love with him he acted like a 3 year old when they find out there going to Disney world. He was thrilled at the fact that Beatrice fancied him. Now on the other side of the garden, Hero and another Woman are doing the same Don Jon, Claudio, and Leonato did to Benidick, only to Beatrice. When Beatrice over hears that Benidick fancy's her she is in shock. She acts as if nothing in thw world was wrong with a huge grin on her face and singing like a love struck teenager. Now these are 2 adults that couldn't stand to be in the same room with each other and now they love each other!There's more to that story then just what we think. But you have to read to find out! I have learned a couple of things from reading this play. Iv learned to like people for who they are inside not on the outside. Hero and Claudio's relationship was based on looks. Iv also learned that when u do wrong things punishment may not come to you just then but eventually it will catch up with you. Don Pedro tricked everyone into thinking common things of Hero and he got what he deserved. And last but not least I learned to put family 2nd to God because when everyone else leaves you will still have family. When Claudio made that scene in front of everyone about Hero Beatrice was right there to comfort her. And I would recommend this book to anyone because it was funny and interesting, And I'm a teen. It's hard to keep our attention but me and my class seem to agree that this play was excellent!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Much Ado About Theatre, Nov. 16 2003
By 
M. Burdin (Drama City, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
Shakespeare's, Much Ado About Nothing, was cleverly composed and delivered in his Old English style of dialogue. It is excellent reading not only for teachers and parents, but also for students as well. I enjoyed the Dover Thrift edition because it is unabridged from the original text and it is exceedingly important to read versions that are as close to the original as possible. The dialogue is very swift and simple to follow.
The action in this play is the result of "love battles" between the characters, Count Claudio and Hero and Signior Benedick and Lady Beatrice. It all began with the hate that Don John had for his legitimate brother and prince, Don Pedro. In the prince's close group of young lords, were Count Claudio and Signior Benedick. Conrade and Borachio were followers of the wicked, Don John. Don John then proceeds to wreck the one important relationship that his brother tried to promote- that of Claudio and Hero. Count Claudio courts the Lady Hero and gains her affection, but through a turn of events, Don John induces Claudio think that Hero has been a wench with the gentleman, Borachio and a myriad of other men in Messina. Paying Borachio handsomely for wooing the servant, Margaret, supposed to be Hero, Don John takes Claudio and Don Pedro to view it from the lawn of the governor's mansion. Then, disgracing Hero in the midst of their wedding party, Claudio is freed from blame and Hero is forced to be claimed dead for her own good. Signior Benedick, being a very cynical lord, tried to woo the Lady Beatrice (Hero's cousin), but she spurned him each time. With a few playful schemes from Don Pedro's party, Beatrice and Benedick are in love permanently. The story plot descends with the capturing of the men who took place in the cabal against Hero. Count Claudio is then forced to mourn and weep for the "loss" of his true love. Hero's father, Leonato, the governor of Messina, commands Claudio to marry his niece who is an identical copy of his deceased daughter. All this agreed upon, Claudio finds out that Hero is still alive and they are married.
Shakespeare, in writing this play, tried to convey to all audiences that love will make people do very silly, giddy things. Benedick had been "the unmarried man" who would not stand for the thought of marriage let alone take part in it, but at the end, he falls in love and is engaged to Beatrice. In the course of the play, Benedick is made a fool of because of what he does for love. With the course character and disposition that he had, it would not have been expected that he would write frothy poems and sing silly love ballads to "sweet Beatrice". Also, Shakespeare let his audience in to the fact that women were not very trusted in his day. In England at that time, men were allowed to be libertines if they wished, but they were only accustomed to marrying virgins. Such was in the case of Hero and Claudio. The Count accused her of improper behavior, everyone else believed it and ignored her version of the story. No matter what answer she gave to the Count's questions, the group only believed Claudio.
In reading this play, I have learned to place comic relief in my own compositions, whether they be poems, novels or short stories. Dogsberry, a very drunk, very unstable comic relief, stumbles upon grand discoveries as Messina's only constable, without even knowing the treasure he has uncovered. This was the case when he arrested Borachio and Conrade on the charges of slander and being "lying knaves". His mixed up dialogue and incredibly stupid actions, cause the reader to enjoy the plot even more.
I recommend this play greatly to all avid readers because of it's incredible art of language and dialogue, knit together by its creator. This play could also be linked to scripture. God says that Satan is the author of all confusion, just like Don John was in the story. Don John caused everyone to doubt the innocence and stability of everyone else, including themselves. I think this play is phenomenal and that everyone should read it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Much Ado About Theatre, Nov. 16 2003
By 
M. Burdin (Drama City, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
Shakespeare's, Much Ado About Nothing, was cleverly composed and delivered in his Old English style of dialogue. It is excellent reading not only for teachers and parents, but also for students as well. I enjoyed the Dover Thrift edition because it is unabridged from the original text and it is exceedingly important to read versions that are as close to the original as possible. The dialogue is very swift and simple to follow.
The action in this play is the result of "love battles" between the characters, Count Claudio and Hero and Signior Benedick and Lady Beatrice. It all began with the hate that Don John had for his legitimate brother and prince, Don Pedro. In the prince's close group of young lords, were Count Claudio and Signior Benedick. Conrade and Borachio were followers of the wicked, Don John. Don John then proceeds to wreck the one important relationship that his brother tried to promote- that of Claudio and Hero. Count Claudio courts the Lady Hero and gains her affection, but through a turn of events, Don John induces Claudio think that Hero has been a wench with the gentleman, Borachio and a myriad of other men in Messina. Paying Borachio handsomely for wooing the servant, Margaret, supposed to be Hero, Don John takes Claudio and Don Pedro to view it from the lawn of the governor's mansion. Then, disgracing Hero in the midst of their wedding party, Claudio is freed from blame and Hero is forced to be claimed dead for her own good. Signior Benedick, being a very cynical lord, tried to woo the Lady Beatrice (Hero's cousin), but she spurned him each time. With a few playful schemes from Don Pedro's party, Beatrice and Benedick are in love permanently. The story plot descends with the capturing of the men who took place in the cabal against Hero. Count Claudio is then forced to mourn and weep for the "loss" of his true love. Hero's father, Leonato, the governor of Messina, commands Claudio to marry his niece who is an identical copy of his deceased daughter. All this agreed upon, Claudio finds out that Hero is still alive and they are married.
Shakespeare, in writing this play, tried to convey to all audiences that love will make people do very silly, giddy things. Benedick had been "the unmarried man" who would not stand for the thought of marriage let alone take part in it, but at the end, he falls in love and is engaged to Beatrice. In the course of the play, Benedick is made a fool of because of what he does for love. With the course character and disposition that he had, it would not have been expected that he would write frothy poems and sing silly love ballads to "sweet Beatrice". Also, Shakespeare let his audience in to the fact that women were not very trusted in his day. In England at that time, men were allowed to be libertines if they wished, but they were only accustomed to marrying virgins. Such was in the case of Hero and Claudio. The Count accused her of improper behavior, everyone else believed it and ignored her version of the story. No matter what answer she gave to the Count's questions, the group only believed Claudio.
In reading this play, I have learned to place comic relief in my own compositions, whether they be poems, novels or short stories. Dogsberry, a very drunk, very unstable comic relief, stumbles upon grand discoveries as Messina's only constable, without even knowing the treasure he has uncovered. This was the case when he arrested Borachio and Conrade on the charges of slander and being "lying knaves". His mixed up dialogue and incredibly stupid actions, cause the reader to enjoy the plot even more.
I recommend this play greatly to all avid readers because of it's incredible art of language and dialogue, knit together by its creator. This play could also be linked to scripture. God says that Satan is the author of all confusion, just like Don John was in the story. Don John caused everyone to doubt the innocence and stability of everyone else, including themselves. I think this play is phenomenal and that everyone should read it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars NOT a review of the movie:, June 12 2003
By 
James Yanni (Bellefontaine Neighbors, Mo. USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
Standard disclaimer: when rating a play by Shakespeare, I rate it as compared to other Shakespearean plays, not as compared to the general run of literature; otherwise, the ratings in general would be too high to be very informative. This play, for instance, would certainly rate five stars in a general rating.
As it is, this play can be read either of two ways, and depending on how one reads it, it's either one of Shakespeare's better comedies, or somewhere below mediocre. Naturally, I prefer to read it the way I like it better, and so rate it highly.
If, however, one reads the dialogue at face value, this is a play bearing many resemblances to my absolutely LEAST favorite of Shakespeare's plays: "The Taming of the Shrew". It is a romantic comedy in which the main plot device is that two people who despise one another manage, in spite of that minor impediment, to fall in love. It has the saving grace that there is no hint of Benedick "taming" Beatrice; their idiocy is mutual and completely parallel, but I've always hated this particular plot, and continue to do so. The continuing popularity of it has contributed to an uncountable number of mismatches in real life, as people have been encouraged by their cultural mythology to believe that strong emotion equals attraction, even when it seems on the surface to be repulsion.
On the other hand, in this play it is very easy to read Beatrice and Benedick's lines, right from the beginning, as more bantering than bickering (although there ARE a couple of places where it is a bit difficult to do so) and as the playful teasing of two people who actually ENJOY each other's company for the challenge of the verbal byplay. If one reads it that way, the play makes a great deal more sense, and is actually quite enjoyable. (Plus, it has the advantage of the romance being between two grownups, rather than lovestruck teenagers, as in "Romeo & Juliet".)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars finest comedy, May 5 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
this is shakespeare's finest comedy. it has the most interesting and well-balanced romance, and a secondary story that is substantial and moving. besides petruchio in 'taming of a shrew', benedick is the only male character in a comedy that is close to being the equal of his female love interest. beatrice is still a bit too much for benedick, but he hangs in there, and their tete-a-tetes make for some of the most interesting lines in all of shakespeare. beatrice is also one of shakespeare's most interesting and charming female characters. i know many readers prefer rosalind from 'as you like it', but i find beatrice's wit, laced as it is with some unexplained bitterness, far more intriguing, even alluring. besides, maan is just a flat-out better story than 'as you like it' or 'twelfth night'. the story never sags as it does in these other plays. it's my favorite shakespeare comedy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars One of Shakespeare's Wittier Comedies, Nov. 25 2002
By 
Chris Salzer (Gainesville, GA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
Much Ado About Nothing emerges as one of the funnier and more clever of Shakespeare's comedies. It is, as Beatrice would say, "as merry as the day is long." I personally enjoyed the wit and cynicism of Benedick and Beatrice in particular as well as the complete and utter chaos concerning Hero and Claudio's proposed union that ensues due to the chicanery and wickedness of the Machiavellian, Iago-like Don John.
The thematic dichotomy of marriage and misogyny resonates throughout the entire play. Much Ado shrilly reverberates in today's society as marriage has become a feared and loathed institution by many as we look at our mates with increased scepticism of the other's fidelity with the comical fear of being made a cuckhold and having the infamous horns grown on our heads. Shakespeare makes this serious theme into a witty and enjoyable comedy: one that ranks at #4 on my Comedy list - just below The Comedy of Errors, The Merchant of Venice, & The Taming of the Shrew. A must read for all Shakespeare aficionados - BEFORE seeing the movie.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Very Nice & Easy To Understand, Aug. 19 2002
By 
Kiran Rajagopalan (Boston, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
I recently read Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" during my freshman year in high school. I was surprised at how readable it is (even without Folger's aids on every other page). The story is very easy to follow and delightfully refreshing! There are some interesting themes in the novel including: women's rights (ironically), true love comes in all packages, male chauvanism, and more hidden deep. My teacher thought it was the perfect segway into "Romeo and Juliet" another of Shakespeare's works. Its a great way for one to 'wet their hands' into Shakespeare's, and Folger's edition of the play is marvelous in doing so due to the fact its one of Shakespeare's simpler plays to comprehend and ponder.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Much Ado About Everything, April 29 2002
By 
Catherine M. Dorkin "willow100cm" (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
The intricate characterization that is posessed in each person is intense. Don John, the bastard brother, however turned evil beneath our eyes. At least, to mine. Perhaps there is an imagery I did not pick up on.
Hero was a delicate flower who had a quiet mischieveous maid at hand, Margaret. Her quick evilness was a surprise, and completely expected at the same time. It was unlike Shakespeare (at least in my readings of his plays) to have a maid be a villian. Margaret's character intrigued me the most because of her sincerness toward Hero but, her obvious greed in regards to foil play against Hero.
The quadrant of love that was in the play enveloped me to read more and more. Although Hero and Claudio were to be the hero and heroine, Beatrice and Benedick provided much more fun. B&B play a very well matched up intellegence, humour and humanity in pale comparison to Hero and Claudio (and probably any Shakespearean duo).
Don Pedro, Hero and Claudio do everything in there power to bring B&B,the non willing duo to say 'I Love You' to the alter. The plan ultimately succeeds.
That bastard, Don John was far more interested however, in getting Hero for himself. So in tern, he gets Borachio to set up a 'date' between Hero and an unknown lover for Claudio to 'stumble' upon, with the help of Borachio.
Read this fascinating play where humour meets dark, the beginning before Shakespeare goes tragic. The play fuses both emotions terrifically. The play is great and is open to great conversation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars One of my Favorite Plays, March 5 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Much ADO about Nothing (Paperback)
This is one of my favorite Shakespeare plays. When I first saw it as a play I did not understand the plot at all. Finally I read the play and enjoyed it immensely. I think one of the reasons that I enjoyed it so much is that it is not a tragedy. I really enjoyed this edition because of the fact that it is written using Shakespeare's vocabulary. But it has definitions of the words that you are most likely going to stumble over.
It has two plots which makes it more interesting, but it is still very easy to follow. Much Ado About Nothing starts off with Count Claudio falling in love with Hero whom he is going to marry. Don John doesn't want him to marry Hero. So Don John decides to come up with a plan to keep Claudio from marrying Hero. The second plot has most of the characters trying to make two people who hate each other fall in love.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Oxford Shakespeare: Much Ado About Nothing
The Oxford Shakespeare: Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare (Paperback - May 17 2008)
CDN$ 10.95 CDN$ 9.86
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews