Customer Reviews


11 Reviews
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Java Reference
I picked this book up a couple months ago and can't imagine how I got along without it before. The first section includes simple examples of common uses of the java packages. I find this extremely useful. There are realms in Java where the intricacies often slip my mind, particularly in java.io, and the small examples of these packages shown in section 1 serve as a...
Published on April 29 2003 by Tim Clark

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for, if you don't have IDE tool.
Volume 1 covers java.beans to org.xml packages useful for server side development.
Volume 2 covers java.applet to javax.swing packages useful for developing GUI application.
This is is a review for Vol. 1.
This book is not for begineers or not for learning A Java.This book is a good reference book
for all the java Packages, Classes and Interface...
Published on June 19 2002 by Rakesh


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Java Reference, April 29 2003
By 
This review is from: The Java¿ Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition) (Paperback)
I picked this book up a couple months ago and can't imagine how I got along without it before. The first section includes simple examples of common uses of the java packages. I find this extremely useful. There are realms in Java where the intricacies often slip my mind, particularly in java.io, and the small examples of these packages shown in section 1 serve as a perfect reminder of how exactly to accomplish my task.
Section 2 is the meat of the book and includes a reference to the classes and their members. This is similar to the online API, but lacking the descriptions for the methods / classes. This is strictly a quick reference of the methods, their arguments, return types and modifiers, and the variables belonging to a class. For a description of every method, use the online API. Personally though, I find this reference quicker to use than the online API when searching for a particular class. It probably comes down to personal preference, though.
Sections 3 and 4 I honestly haven't found a need for. The first two sections alone are worth the (relatively) [inexpensive] price of the book.
For reference, my qualifications include Sun Java Programmer Certification 1.4 (Passed with an 86%), Graduated Magna Cum Laude from UMass Dartmouth with a Computer Science degree.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars An essential reference, Dec 3 2002
By 
Charles Ashbacher (Marion, Iowa United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Java¿ Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition) (Paperback)
For some time, the Java Developers Almanac version 1.3 has been my constant companion when I taught my courses in Java. With it at my side, I was always able to answer questions of the form, "What class(method) do you use for . . . ?" It is one of that small of number of indispensable references that occupy my special shelf of books that stay within reach of my main workstation.
However, now it has been superceded by this version, the first volume of which covers 91 packages used in server-side development. It is a quick, yet thorough reference to the classes. Each description of a class in part 2 has the name and package it is found in, the inheritance tree describing how it is derived and the prototypes of all data and methods. Part 1 has small segments of code that illustrate the basics of how a class is used. The code examples are organized according to packages, where the packages are listed alphabetically. This makes it very easy to find the basic information about any class and method of the class. There is also a list of newly deprecated members, a complete list of all possible exceptions, a list of the modifications from 1.3 and the default values of the swing UI elements.
This book is rarely more than two feet from my body when I am writing Java and when it gets too far away, I correct the problem very quickly. I included it in my best books of the year column for the online Journal of Object Technology. ...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Good for, if you don't have IDE tool., June 19 2002
By 
Rakesh (Columbia, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Java¿ Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition) (Paperback)
Volume 1 covers java.beans to org.xml packages useful for server side development.
Volume 2 covers java.applet to javax.swing packages useful for developing GUI application.
This is is a review for Vol. 1.
This book is not for begineers or not for learning A Java.This book is a good reference book
for all the java Packages, Classes and Interface.
Packages is useful when you need an overview of a package or what other related classes are
available in a package.
Classes gives complete detail of the ancestry of the class and a list of every member in the
class.This part is useful when you're already working with a particular class and want quick
reference to all of the members in the class.
It has lots of hands on examples, which are very useful for finishing a particular task like,
reading a file, sending a socket etc. like programmers need some basic routines,while coding.
I recommend this book for those, who does professional coding and need to in touch with API.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars half of it useful, May 10 2002
This review is from: The Java¿ Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition) (Paperback)
nice and soft, printed on light thin paper, the book is divided in two halves. The first half has snippets of code showing how to do this and that, organized in package order (javax.swing are in the yet to be published 2nd volume). Very useful. The second half is a very detailed class documentation in alphabetical order. My take is that if you have an IDE like VisualAge, which allows you to browse through classes and methods, and their references, senders, implementors, then this section of the book is not necessary. On the other hand, if you leaf through the latest Java in a Nutshell... The first half of the book also reminds of Java Cookbook. Couple of things I am perplexed by all these example books is that when exposing an example with dates, they all use the Date class. Unfortunately, this class cannot represent a date prior to 1970, thus many birtdays of living adults today cannot be represented (CalendarDate should be used). The other difficulty in finding example is custom events, property change events, non-bean events.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A great reference for a language growing in complexity, April 13 2002
By 
Charles Ashbacher (Marion, Iowa United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Java¿ Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition) (Paperback)
Once again, I have found a book for my special shelf of frequently used reference books that I keep within arms reach. This book starts with the Java library at the level of the package and then works down to the individual class level. I find such a reference absolutely essential and my copy of the original Java Developers Almanac has been used so often that the individual pages are falling out. I teach Java classes to experienced developers and I have always kept it at my side to answer those inevitable questions concerning prototypes and other methods available in a class.
The examples in this book make it more helpful than if it was just a listing of methods. While I can generally figure out how a method is used from the prototype, seeing it called in a plausible scenario generally reduces the time in going from bafflement to understanding. The book is also well indexed, so very little time is wasted in searching for the desired package or class.
I strongly recommend this book as a reference for the Java language, and it will appear on my list of top ten books of the year.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Much better and faster then browsing the online material, March 27 2001
By 
Goldin Evgeny (Berlin, Germany) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
1) See the title .. All info you ever need about API structure, classes, details .. in your hand and not in 100 IE bookmarks.
2) I have to deal with class files on the bytecodes level and didn't expect this book to be much useful for me - suprise !!! It has an excellent table "Class File Format" ( I had to built one such for myself long time ago ) and some others regarding bytecodes issues - very nice and comfortable. It's only ~5 hours I own this book but already pulled it 5 times from the shelf. So, it's not a question of "buy or not" - buy !
3) We all enjoyed reading this in preface : "There was a time, not long ago, when I intimately knew all of the Java class libraries .. ( of course, it helped me that I was on of the original developers :-) But aside from the occasional inability to remember which argument of Vector.insertElementAt() is the index, I rarely had to refer to any reference documentation .."
Thank you, Patrick !
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Great book, poor format, Sept. 27 2000
By 
tahiry_fako@yahoo.com (Roseville, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
As a user of the 1998 AND (not so much) the 1999 edition I have to say that the content is just as great as its predecessors. It is an indispensible desk reference for any serious Java programmer. My only gripe with the 2000 edition is the same gripe I and many other users have and it's the size of the book. The compactness of the 1998 edition was and is what makes it so practical. I don't know why the fonts of this new edition had to be made bigger yet when the 1998 font size and book size OBVIOUSLY had a lot of fans. Anyways, maybe two sizes would help then. Anyways, I did not buy this book because of those issues although I am still itching to get it anyways. (To Addison-Wesley: Please, please publish a compact version.)
Another great thing, Patrick Chan actually sent me an email about my review of the 1999 Almanac that contained the same criticism and I thought it was a nice touch.
Great book otherwise.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Not useful to me, June 19 2002
This review is from: The Java¿ Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition) (Paperback)
I'm a hardcore Java developer. I develop non-trivial client/server applications 10+ hours a day for a living. The concept behind the book sounded useful. I was wrong. A big listing of classes and method signatures is not useful. How is...
Socket: public void setOOBInline(boolean on) throws SocketException
... helpful information? It doesn't aid me in finding the method I need to do something, it doesn't aid me in figuring out what a method does... it doesn't help me to understand how to use a class or method, it is just raw information.
Browsing through the on-line javadocs are far easier and more productive for me. If you want a good Java reference book, the "Java Class Libraries" books are FAR more useful (and I highly recommend them).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Just like its predecessor, June 4 2000
The Java Developers ALMANAC 2000 is one the best reference books that I've every seen. It clearly goes through the class libraries. Clever use of <B>bold</B> text formatting and a terse set of symbols representing modifiers and OO concepts make this a very "dense" reference in a relatively small volume.
The printing and paper quality is good too. The book should be printed every quarter !
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars This is what i call complete reference, July 31 2000
Well there is so much material in this book. WOW! buy it asap if you are looking for some good java reference book. Almost nothing is missed out in this book. Plus points the book is reader friendly and is also up to date. You need this book even if you are only occasional java programmer. BUY IT.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Java¿ Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition)
CDN$ 36.99 CDN$ 28.13
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews