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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book Review
Book Review of
The Hobbit written by J. R. R. Tolkien
By Scott Koors
The Hobbit is a very interesting and exciting book. The main character, Bilbo, is a little dwarf person that doesn't wear any shoes that they call a hobbit. Bilbo and a great wizard, Gandalf, set out on a great adventure together. The two of them overcome some unbelievable hardships...
Published on April 16 2004 by Scott Koors

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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars 70th anniversary edition rather disappointing, go with ANNOTATED HOBBIT instead., October 24, 2007
[This is a review of the 70th Anniversary Edition, not so much of THE HOBBIT itself. I've reviewed the book proper elsewhere, and would rather focus on the actual edition itself.]

THE HOBBIT is one of those few books that I have felt justified to buy multiple copies over the years. It is a book I have read and cherished, and a book I dearly love. THE HOBBIT is...
Published on Sept. 1 2012 by Mike London


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book Review, April 16 2004
By 
Scott Koors (Indianapolis, IN USA) - See all my reviews
Book Review of
The Hobbit written by J. R. R. Tolkien
By Scott Koors
The Hobbit is a very interesting and exciting book. The main character, Bilbo, is a little dwarf person that doesn't wear any shoes that they call a hobbit. Bilbo and a great wizard, Gandalf, set out on a great adventure together. The two of them overcome some unbelievable hardships. They also make some new friends and at the same time some new enemies.
This book allows you to let your imagination run wild. I found that I was putting myself into the different character's shoes during the story. I just imagined how scary, but at the same time, how exciting it must have been for them. Even though there is a lot of science-fiction things in the book, I could still picture all of the scenes and settings. The book wasn't too abstract. I also felt that the book was very detailed. I could almost paint a picture of what was happening in the book in my head.
I have always enjoyed reading adventurous books and this one was no different. The book kept me entertained the whole time. I found it hard to put it down, I just couldn't stop reading it. I had to keep reading just to find out what happened next. This was pretty unusual for me, since I don't really enjoy reading that much. The Hobbit was just an all around good book that keeps your attention, while at the same time allows your imagination to run wild. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes a good adventurous book, that is written very well by J. R. R. Tolkien.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely copy to entice the younguns, Nov. 19 2009
By 
Malkie Bear (Toronto, Ontario CANADA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hobbit Illustrated Edition (Hardcover)
A classic, plain and simple. The illustrations are whimsical, sophisticated, and there are plenty of them. A nice copy printed on quality paper, this edition will stand up to many, many readings.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There and back again, June 6 2009
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Hobbit (Mass Market Paperback)
"In a hole in the ground, there lived a hobbit." J.R.R. Tolkien first scribbed down the opening line of this book on an extra sheet of paper.

And years before "Lord of the Rings" was seen by anyone outside Tolkien's circle, Middle Earth was first introduced to readers. "The Hobbit" is simpler and less epic than the trilogy that followed it, but Tolkien's brilliant writing, magical world and pleasantly stodgy hero bring a special life to this early fantasy classic.

Bilbo Baggins lives a pleasantly stodgy and dull life, in a luxurious hobbit hole under a hill ("it was a hobbit hole, and that means comfort"). He's the picture of dull respectability.

But his life is turned upside-down by the arrival of the wizard Gandalf and thirteen dwarves, led by the exiled king-in-waiting Thorin Oakenshield. They want to reclaim the Lonely Mountain (and a lot of treasure) from the dragon Smaug. Why do they want Bilbo? Because Gandalf has told them that he'd make a good burglar, even though Bilbo has never burgled in his life.

So before Bilbo is entirely sure what is going on, he is being swept off on a very unrespectable -- and dangerous -- adventure. The quirky little band ends up battling goblins and spiders, nearly getting eaten, and imprisoned by Elves, while Bilbo finds himself in possession of a magic Ring from the treacherous Gollum. But even with a magic Ring, can he defeat a monstrous dragon and win a war against multiple enemies?

Tolkien had been crafting his mythos of Elves, Dwarves, Wizards and ancient Men for years before he ever came up with Bilbo's quest. But it's fortunately that he did, because while "The Hobbit" is overshadowed by the epic sweep of "Lord of the Rings" and the "Silmarillion," it's still an entertaining story that lays the groundwork for his more famous works -- especially the magical Ring that Bilbo finds in Gollum's cavern.

Tolkien's writing is swift, light and full of songs and poetry-laden descriptions, such as interludes in the shimmering, ethereal Rivendell and the cold, terrible Lonely Mountain. The pace in this is much faster than in most of his other works -- not surprising, when you consider it was originally a bedtime story for his children.

Most of the book's action is about Bilbo trying to keep himself and the dwarves from getting eaten, torn apart, or rotting in elf dungeons, but with some quiet interludes like a night at Beorn's mountain home. And the last chapters hint at the epic majesty that Tolkien was capable of, as well as the idea that even little people -- like a mild-mannered hobbit or a bird -- can change the world.

This book also first came up with hobbits -- the peaceful fuzzy-footed countryfolk -- in the form of Bilbo Baggins. He's a likable little guy, if the last person you'd ever expect to be a hero -- initially he seems weak and kind of boring, but his hidden strengths and wits come up to the surface when he needs to. By the end, he's almost a different person.

The dwarves are more comical, and the elves more whimsical in this book, but the supporting characters are still impressive -- the crotchety, mysterious wizard Gandalf, the dignified, flawed Dwarf king Thorin Oakenshield, and a Guardsman who becomes a king. Even minor characters like Beorn, Elrond and the menacing Smaug are given plenty of dimension.

"The Hobbit" started as a fluke, grew into a bedtime story, and became one of the best fantasy stories in literary history -- a charming adventure in the time that never was. Brilliant.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a story that grows with the reader., Aug. 24 2007
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
In a mythical or maybe just forgotten time, many creatures lived in places like the Shire, home to Bilbo Baggins, Hobbit. Hobbits are comfort loving creatures with no real sense for adventure. A knock on the door and Bilbo's life is about to change.

Calling this book children's book is like calling "Alice in Wonderland" [see "The Annotated Alice"] a children's book. Yes children can read this book and it is fun. How ever there is a lot more to this book than a cute story. And it has all the depth of the other Tolkien works with the exception of being shorter.

Many people look at this story as a prequel to "The Lord of the Rings", where in reality it is a stand-alone story with a perfectly good beginning, middle, and end. When you read "The Lord of the Rings" there is enough description to forgo "The Hobbit." Personally, I find that reading The Lord of the Rings first gave me the in-depth background to better appreciate The Hobbit.
Many of the creatures and adventures will put you on the edge of your seat. You will recognize the personalities and grow along will Bilbo as he faces new challenges as he learns to deal with life.
A good book to read first would be "The Power of Myth" by Joseph Campbell. Then you get a clearer picture of why the story progresses as it does.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A return to childhood imagination, May 27 2002
By 
Christopher Little (Owen Sound, Ontario) - See all my reviews
The Hobbit written by JRR Tolkien is an adventure fantasy novel in which contains a profusion of courage, adventure and Imagination. These three qualities unite, and create one of the finest adventure novels of all time. Tolkien keeps the reader on the edge of his/her seat begging to turn the page by delivering climax after climax in this famous fantasy novel.
Tolkien initially grabs the reader with his in depth descriptive writing. His words describe the adventures of Bilbo Baggins so vividly that the reader becomes overwhelmed and begins to believe that he/she is indeed the protagonist. Although Tolkien intended The Hobbit to be a children's novel, the writing is still relevant for all ages. The Hobbit can take any average overscheduled adult away from his/her everyday stresses and return them back to their untainted childhood imaginations. This getaway is created on behalf of Tolkien's fantastically vivid descriptions of landscapes, feelings and characters. Even though the story is completely unbelievable, Tolkien describes everything in such incredible detail that the reader starts to believe that Hobbiton is a real place and being Bilbo Baggins is not fictional anymore.
The Hobbit is also a great read because of the never-ending climaxes throughout the book. Tolkien grabs the reader and keeps them captive for an entire novel. It becomes hard to put down the book because you are dawning on another expedition right after you just finished one. One could argue that Tolkien attempted to create a tie between the reader and the protagonist. Tolkien creates this tie through the comparison of Bilbo's sleeping patterns and that of the readers' patterns. Whenever Bilbo has had a long stretch without sleep the reader has not put down the book, however when Bilbo goes to sleep it is in a recession in the story's peaks. For example after Bilbo had left home he had slept very little until he went to Beorns house. This patterning style gives the reader an opportunity to take a rest. This use of literacy makes The Hobbit a very entertaining read.
In this novel we meet many different characters, enemy or friend. All of which seemed to be relevant except for the thirteen dwarves Bilbo travelled with. It would seem as though Tolkien added these characters just to aggravate the reader. During the novel these thirteen dwarves who were supposed to be running the show did nothing accept slow the process down by either passing out, getting lost or being captured; with the exception of Elrond, who is able to translate the moon-runes, and Bard, who is able to understand the language of the bird, Roac. Therefore leaving only two practical dwarves. Throughout the novel the reader continuously ask himself or herself 'why doesn't Bilbo just leave these idiots and do it himself?' This question remains unanswered at the end of the novel, in turn leaving the reader irritated. This is indeed a small blunder created by the author, however if he did indeed make these dwarves relevant it would have enhanced the story.
All things considered, The Hobbit is a fantastic adventure novel for all ages. It constantly brings the reader out of the frying pan and into the fire. It is truly unbelievable how imaginative Tolkien was. His literary intelligence gives every reader of The Hobbit a reminiscent taste of what it was like as a child with a wild imagination. The novel truly tickles the minds imagination, leaving us believing that everyone should have a little Bilbo Baggins in them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A childhood favorite, April 20 2002
By 
Ms Diva "cycworker" (Nanaimo, B.C. Canada) - See all my reviews
I read this book when I was about 9 or 10. Up until that time, even though I was a good reader, I didn't particularly enjoy it. Tolkien showed me just how powerful literature could be, and I haven't stopped reading since.
What I enjoyed the most about this book was the well developed, three dimensional characters. I could almost picture them in my mind. Tolkein had a gift for creating imagery that is beautiful and realistic. His use of language totally enraptured me and kept me engrossed in the story.
What's really neat about this book, as well, is that I think it will have as much appeal to girls as it does to boys. That has not been the case in other fantasy-type books I've read. In fact, this novel is really the only one of it's genre that I've ever enjoyed. So, don't be put off if you think you don't like fantasy. I would also note that there is an abridged version with illustrations that younger children (I saw a grade one class sit totally still as their teacher read from it to them) will likely enjoy. Despite being pegged by some as a "kid's book", however, this book is actually one that will appeal to readers of all ages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Indispensable Prerequisite to The Lord of the Rings, April 19 2002
By 
Kent Wittrup (Lynn, MA United States) - See all my reviews
Literarily speaking, chapter one of The Hobbit is the best thing ever written for children in English. What follows is a series of increasingly improbable adventures, which arose naturally out of Tolkien's storytelling practice with his own children.
While by no means proof against enjoyment by girls, it must be admitted that The Hobbit is very much a boy's book, its cozily domestic subtext serving to highlight its absence of female characters, its wilderness settings and grisly violence. Its saving grace is Tolkien's enchanting sense of humor, which continues to be consistently reassuring throughout.
What it requires of its readers is not however boyhood, or even childhood: what it requires is a sense of adventure. Anybody with one of those is ill-advised to neglect reading this justly renowned neo-saga, which was legendary in character to begin with, and has since become legendary in nature as well.
Its most distinctive features are the maps, the verses, and the medieval authenticity. There are two maps, one of which is used in the story repeatedly. The verses are in ballad measures, including dwarf and goblin as well as hobbit songs. The early section of the Old Norse Elder Edda (Dvergatal), from which Tolkien took the names of his dwarves and wizard, remains even now displaced in an appendix at the end of Hollander's standard translation.
Initially published in 1937, The Hobbit's composition was contemporary with Tolkien's pioneering published lecture on Beowulf, which revitalized the scholarship on and initiated a modern criticism of that sternest of British works. Read for publication by Tolkien's future lifelong publisher Rayner Unwin at age 10, The Hobbit sold unexpectedly well in the United States in its slightly inferior first edition (later revised to conform with The Lord of the Rings) and produced an immediate demand for a sequel, which did not however appear until those who had read The Hobbit as children were beginning to have children of their own.
Various protestations to the contrary, The Hobbit remains an indispensable prerequisite to The Lord of the Rings. The Fellowship of the Rings movie might have been better, if its producers had filmed The Hobbit first.
I trust that it will eventually be confirmed, if it isn't known for a fact already, that the Los Angeles meteorologist, who coined our familiar term for urban air pollution, really did mean to name it after the dragon in The Hobbit.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bedtime Reading Ritual, April 12 2010
By 
Robert Garvey "Triptych" (Winnipeg, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a beautiful book which actually comes in a 'bound' box constructed of the same material as the hardcover binding. It even includes a few colour illustrations by Tolkien himself.

I won't bother discussing the story itself as by now, we are all familiar with the story as well as the author and the major sequel story that was eventually made into a highly recognized series of movies.

I'm currently reading a little bit every night to my nine-year old and we're both thoroughly enjoying it. A big (and welcome) change from all of the 'Toy Franchise' marketing material out there.

The book itself is so well made and the story so timeless (and perpetually allegorical to contemporary events) that I can even see passing this on to him when he has kids of his own!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Hobbit, a must read for anyone who has the ability!, April 23 2002
The Hobbit is probably one of the best books ever written in history. It keeps me on the edge of my seat the whole way through, and makes me feel as if I was there, walking beside the group of dwarves or Bilbo himself. The details are rich, you can feel the awesomeness of this amazing story, and it is a _great_ prequel to the Lord of the Rings trilogy. It's interesting looking at the level of greed in the dwarves. They care for nothing but treasure, or so it seems. Another thing is probably Tolkein's writing style and how it changes from this book to the rest of the trilogy. The Hobbit is a must read for anyone who enjoys books and diving in to a great story. This book is truly amazing!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a page-turner, June 22 2003
i used to think i would hate lotr books, never having been a fan of the genre and dwarfs, elves, etc...
i borrowed hobbit off a freind and picked it up till i could find something else to read. But, I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN! I LOVED every minute reading it, and had to literally force myself to leave it! The characters are likeable and real, not the stereotypes i expected, and the plot is fast-paced and keeps you riveted, with lots of action and suspense. I found one particulair scene with smaug the dragon, breath-taking.
Im shocked that I liked it so much, really didnt expect to! Next im getting the lotr trilogy- never thought i'd say that!
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Hobbit Illustrated Edition
Hobbit Illustrated Edition by J.R.R. Tolkien (Hardcover - Oct. 23 1997)
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