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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You better go ahead and buy them all now
I am not going to fill you in on the many lives of J.R.R. Tolkien. Nor am I going to paraphrase the story. J.R.R. Tolkien himself tells you what you need to know in the prolog. However I don't believe that people take him seriously when he says that this work is not an allegory.

The reason I say buy the complete "Lord of the Rings" now is that you will just be...
Published on Sept. 16 2006 by bernie

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A review of the READER -- not the BOOK.
Now, this is probably going to be an unpopular review because people will see the three stars and think, "What, is he out of his mind? The Lord of the Rings is one of the best books ever written". And it is. But this is not a review of the book, it is a review of Rob Inglis' READING of the book. And the editorial raves not withstanding, I am sorry to say that...
Published on March 28 2002 by Graham Henderson


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You better go ahead and buy them all now, Sept. 16 2006
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
I am not going to fill you in on the many lives of J.R.R. Tolkien. Nor am I going to paraphrase the story. J.R.R. Tolkien himself tells you what you need to know in the prolog. However I don't believe that people take him seriously when he says that this work is not an allegory.

The reason I say buy the complete "Lord of the Rings" now is that you will just be picking up speed and getting everything straight in your mind and you will come to the end of this volume. Talk about a cliffhanger. This animal leaves you with several.

Everyone in the book seems to enjoy pleasures. So should you and consider buying the hardback book. My images of the critters of course do not match any pictures. However you don't have to strain your eyes with a paperback in one hand, tea in the other and a cat in the third. A good size book will help detour any animals heading for your lap.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lord of Fantasy, Jan. 12 2004
"The English-speaking world is divided into those who have read THE LORD OF THE RINGS, and those that is going to read it." - Sunday Times.
Assuming you fall into first category a synopsis is redundant, and assuming you are in the second category it is a spoiler. Simply summed up then Fellowship of the Ring is the continuation of THE HOBBIT OR THERE AND BACK AGAIN, which recounts the (mis)adventures of a hobbit, Mr. Bilbo Baggins and a ring. FELLOWSHIP, focuses on Bilbo's heir Frodo Baggins who when Bilbo in his aged state decides to leave his home in Middle-Earths shire, home to hobbits, leaves everything to Frodo. The mysterious yet kind wizard Gandolf drops hints to Frodo that the magic ring is not some parlour trinket, but of a dark design once owned by the evil Sauron, who seeks to claim "the one true ring to rule them all again." Hence Frodo and his friends begin their journey to destroy the Ring before the forces of evil can destroy them.
Might be hyperbole, but this is debatably the greatest fantasy epic ever written. The measuring stick against which all fantastic tales written since has been measured. Tolkien's gift of language and descriptive detail is second to none, possibly he was a magician in England conjuring stories in reaction to his keen distaste for what he saw the Industrial revolution doing. Read in that context adds an additional layer to a tale into which depths more than one hobbit, elf, dwarf and yes human has fallen.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Neils review, June 4 2002
By A Customer
The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three books in The Lord of the Rings; a story set in the fictional world of Middle Earth. The Lord of the Rings is Sauron, the Dark Lord, who long ago lost the One Ring that holds much of his power. His really wants his ring back and is controls some of the inhabitants Middle Earth. Through unknown ways, the ring is given to Frodo Baggins, a hobbit. Because of the ring, however, Frodo is caught up in business that will change Middle Earth forever
.
With Gandalf advice, Frodo sets out with three of his hobbit friends to keep the ring out of Sauron's hands. Lord Sauron's minions attack them, but, with the help of a man named Strider, they make it safely to Rivendell, a home of elves. There, with the help of Elrond, Frodo takes the task of taking the ring to the only place it can be destroyed, the pits of hell in the fiery mountain Orodruin, inside Sauron's realm of Mordor. A Fellowship is created to help him, consisting of Frodo, his servant Sam, two other hobbits, Strider, Gandalf, an elf named Legolas, a dwarf named Gemini, and a man from the south named Boromir.
The Fellowship heads south and tries to pass under the Misty Mountains through Moria, the ancient realm of the dwarves. There, Gandalf falls into the chasm of Khazad-dum while protecting the party from a terrible demon called a Balrog. The rest of the party continues on to Lorien, the forest of the Galadrim elves, where the Galadriel tests their hearts and gives them gifts to help them on the quest. From there, they go down the Anduin River by boat. When they must return to land, they cannot decide whether to head toward Mordor on the east or toward the sanctuary of Minas Tirith on the west. Boromir wants the ring and confronts Frodo, who decides that he must go to Mordor. However, Frodo cannot bear to take his friends with him or to subject them to further temptation, so he attempts to leave secretly and continue the quest alone. He does not, however, manage to escape his faithful friend Sam, so they set out together for the realm of the Dark Lord.
I really liked this book it was good easy reading. I am a complete Fantasy guy so I loved that and it has a great plot. I really like Strider a lot but Lord Sauron is the coolest by far.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Well writen, but could you leave out some of the detail, June 3 2002
By 
As I read through the incredible story of The Fellowship of The Ring I was amazed at what J.R.R. Tolkien was able to create. Through all the imagination of the story and wide variety of characters I was entranced from the minute I started reading. I felt like I was part of the story all the way through to the end.
I very much enjoyed The Lord of The Rings and am quite excited to finally be moving on to the second book. Throughout the first book you really get the introduction of the story and all the characters. From poor old Bilbo to the young spirit filled Frodo the adventure begins.
It really starts out in the quiet parts of the Shire where Bilbo and Frodo Baggins both live. On Bilbo's 111th birthday he leaves the Shire forever leaving Frodo his most prized possession. This most prized possession is the ring. To describe the ring I leave you this poem of description which can be found in the first page of the book. Three Rings for the elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their hall of stone, Nine for mortal men doomed to die, One for the dark lord on his dark thrown, In the land of mordor where the shadows lie. One ring to rule them all, One ring to find them, One ring to bring them all together and in the darkness bind them, In the land of Mordor where the shadows lie. This one ring falls into the hands of our young boy Frodo and on his adventure to destroy the ring is where the real plot begins. My favorite part of The Lord of The Rings I must say is the part where the company is staying in Bree and come across there soon to be 5th companion named Strider. The descriptions of this great powerful man with rustic, broad features are amazing and very overtaking. He is by far my favorite character.
Overall I really enjoyed this book and I would recommend it to everyone who can get through all the details and really enjoy the true nature of the book. J.R.R. Tolkien really takes you through his own world of imagination and I hope you enjoy the book like I did.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Strong Fellowship, May 28 2002
By A Customer
A Review by Jordan
A young hobbit embarks on a journey to destroy the ultimate ring that will release destruction upon Middle Earth if the true owner gets hold of it. The fellowship meets a raider name Strider and he save them from these dark riders who are after the ring. They join up with a dwarf and an elf to make the fellowship of nine.
This was a great book with a lot of details and a lot of imagination. It is a book of might and magic, also friendship and the battles against an evil warrior. I enjoyed this book but I didn´¿t like some of the parts where they got into a lot of detail and little actions. I also couldn´¿t fallow all of the different names sometimes, I found myself flipping back and forth though the book asking my self, ´¿what was that again,´¿ or ´¿who is that,´¿ but you get a better understanding of the beginning if you have read Tolkien´¿s first book ´¿The Hobbit´¿ which is kind of the prequel to the ´¿Lord of the Rings´¿ series.
I would recommend this book for those with patience and imagination. If you enjoyed ´¿The Hobbit´¿ or you like books with wizards, elves, and goblins then you will love this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Award-Winning book, May 17 2002
By A Customer
This book is the finest piece of writing that I have ever read. The Fellowship of the Ring though it is a rather old book, it still is very good. The Author starts out by telling about the events of what happened in the book The Hobbit and then goes on to tell about the events that currently are happening in Hobbiton, which is where the majority of hobbits in the story live and are from. Without giving away too much, the story then takes a turn for the worst, and the hero of the story, Bilbo Baggins, Must take the ring of power once held by Sauron, where is must be destroyed. The bulk of the first book in the series is about the journey to rivendell, which is where the elves are located, and then they must get south to the area close to Rohan and Gondor, the humans civilizations in the story. The book in my opinion is a good book because the characters are all developed very well, and they all have a back-story behind them, and they all have something to tell and for the most part seems blank in the story. The author is very descriptive in his writing, and likes to share a lot of details with the reader that would normally be left out of other books because of time restraints, or other reasons that need not be discussed. The basic factor behind this book is that the author is so good that the book works around the few problems that it has, and works through them with tremendous steam driving force. The problems that the book mostly experiences are that, the author sometimes goes too in depth with detail, and he sometimes drags on and on with certain parts. Some may find this very interesting, but from where I stand it goes on too long some times, and doesn't really progress to anything of real importance that may be used by the reader. But some believe that when the author goes into this extreme depth that he gets a point across, he sometimes does this but other times the detail just goes on and on without getting anywhere. The major strong points of this movie are that the characters are given real depth and they know what their doing based on what that type of character would normally decide in that situation, and not what the author would decide if He was there in that condition, and based on this the book accomplishes the factor that those characters have a very humanistic quality to them, and they always know where they are going based on their conditions. The characters though there are many of them, all have a very unique quality that they share with one another and themselves that they always want to accomplish a certain goal for the group and themselves. For example the character Boromir in the story is from the nation of Gondor, he comes with the Fellowship in about the middle of the story, when the fellowship is first formed. He comes to accomplish his own goals with the ring; he wishes to use the ring for good and not to destroy it, without giving too much away this will eventually bring about the end of him, because of his greed for the ring, which shows real humanistic quality and how someone would genuinely react to this sort of instance that may occur for them. Overall I would say that this book is a genuinely the best that I've read, for the most part it overcomes the obstacles and passes through the trenches to become an award-winning book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Part One of One of the Greatest Trilogies in HISTORY!, May 10 2002
By 
Andrew "Radaar" (Chicago, IL, USA) - See all my reviews
Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. This is the grim lesson learned by many who have sought the One Ring Of Power, a relic with powers of astonishing magnitude. Anyone who has ever possessed it has succumbed to its power... Except one. Frodo Baggins is the nephew of Bilbo Baggins from The Hobbit. The ring that Bilbo found in that story is the One Ring, which was thought to be lost for centuries. Frodo is asked by Gandalf the Wizard to deliver the Ring to the town of Rivendell so that a council can decide how to destroy it before its maker Sauron revives himself and reclaims the Ring, then destroys the world. At the council, no one can agree on who should be the "Ring-Bearer" and bring the Ring to Mordor so that it can be destroyed. Along with Frodo go eight others, who are dubbed the Fellowship of the Ring. This includes Gandalf the Wizard, Aragorn and Boromir, the humans, Legolas, the elf, Gimli, the dwarf, and the hobbits, Merry, Pippin, and Sam. But this is no easy task. Ringwraiths, trapped spirits forced to serve Sauron, are relentlessly searching for the Fellowship. What's more, Saruman (not to be confused with Sauron), a former ally, has become corrupt and obssesses over the Ring, and wants its power for himself. This is a great book, so if you haven't read it, at least check it out. You won't be disappointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The beginning of the beginning, April 30 2002
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
A new wave of readers are devouring the Tolkien books, thanks to the arrival of the first of the movie blockbusters (as you can tell by the pic of Elijah Wood on the cover). And that is definitely a good thing, because this trilogy not only spurred the fantasy genre into a respectable position, but also provided the template for virtually every elf, dwarf, lost king, and medieval fantasy world since. It's also a darn good read.
We open some sixty years after the events of "The Hobbit" -- Bilbo Baggins is older, not much wiser, and quite eccentric. He has also adopted his bright young nephew/cousin Frodo, who was orphaned at a young age and had led a rather fractured life after that. On his 111th birthday, Bilbo suddenly vanishes, leaving behind all his possessions to Frodo -- including the golden ring that allows its wearer to become invisible.
Seventeen years later, Gandalf the wizard shows up again on Frodo's doorstep, and informs the aghast young hobbit that his ring is in fact the One Ring of the dark lord Sauron. It corrupts those who have it, and most of Sauron's power is invested in it. Trying to deflect danger from the Shire, Frodo leaves with his best friend Sam and his loyal cousins Merry and Pippin. But Frodo has only the slightest idea of the hideous and dangerous journey ahead of him...
Many fantasy cliches were spawned from this book (they weren't cliches when Tolkien used them). Orcs, elves, dwarves, halflings, sprawling medieval kingdoms, dethroned kings, gray-bearded wizards and evil Dark Lords. But no one will feel that these are stale; on the contrary, they feel fresh and unused, because that is what they were. Tolkien also demonstrated his skill in keeping the "feel" of the different races separate; without being too obvious, he emphasized the subtle differences between Elves, Dwarves, hobbits and Men. There are faint but distinguishable differences in their speech patterns and thought processes. You could never get Frodo mixed up with Legolas.
Narrative-wise, this book begins on much the same note as "The Hobbit": it's lighter and more cheerful. But darker undertones begin to crop up in the very first chapter, when Bilbo begins clutching at the Ring and speaking in a Gollum-like manner. (The reader almost wants to yell "Don't do it!" when Frodo is given the Ring) The pace is pretty slow and gradual until the hobbits reach Bree, at which point it becomes darker, faster and harsher in tone and pace. The matter in it also becomes more mature, particularly in the chilling scenes after Frodo is stabbed by a Nazgul.
One of the things that Tolkien did exceptionally well is atmosphere. With a minimum of words, he conveys the menace of the Black Riders, the beauty of the Elves, the decay of the ancient kingdom of Moria, the mystery of such characters as Aragorn. In some areas, he deliberately didn't overdo the descriptions of such things as the Balrog, leaving the visualization up to the readers. Another strong point is a sense of epic proportions. Too often a fantasy writer TRIES to write an epic, at the expense of individual character development. Tolkien managed to balance both of them, by focusing on the individuals in the center of epic struggles.
I will warn you that you should have the second and third books on hand when you read this. As this was originally intended to be one huge chunk of a book, it ends on a semi-cliffhanger. (The movie ends in about the same place, so if it frustrated you there, you'd be frustrated here as well) If you're a person who can't handle anything more complex than a half-hour sitcom, or think that Harry Potter is the pinnacle of modern literature, then this book is not for you.
Frodo himself is the quintessential "little guy" hero, one of the last people whom you'd expect to be on a mission to save the world. He's prone to moods of either cheerfulness or sadness, a little immature and bored at the beginning, but incredibly brave and stout-hearted when the pressure is put on him. Self-sacrifice is his middle name. Unlike Luke Skywalker and Harry Potter, Frodo also has no astounding destiny or special powers to help him. He's simply an ordinary person, an everyman... or should I say "everyhobbit."
We also have Gandalf, who is fleshed out from the pleasantly crabby wizard of "Hobbit" -- we see more of his hidden sides and powers here. Sam, though not yet fully into the selfless role he plays in books two and three, aptly demonstrates his loyalty and love for Frodo, as well as displaying his progression from a shy young hobbit with a fascination for Elves to a bolder, more decisive person. Merry and Pippin aren't quite into their full roles either, but they are excellent: Merry is mature beyond his years, and Pippin is (and I say this with all affection) a goodhearted flake. Elf and Dwarf fans will find their enjoyment in Legolas and Gimli, who initially grate on each other, but show the beginnings of a loyal friendship.
Tolkien wasn't the first fantasy writer, but he can rightly be described as the first noted fantasy writer, and he remains top of the heap today.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fellowship of the Ring, April 16 2002
By A Customer
The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings is a novel written by one of the most famous authors ever, JRR Tolkien. The novel is actually broken up into 3 parts, the first part is 'The Fellowship of the Rings', the 2nd is 'The Two Towers', and the 3rd is 'The Return of the King'. These books in that order are a follow up to the even more famous book by him 'The Hobbit'. The Lord of the Rings takes you on an adventure with four young hobbits and their companions to destroy the ring that was placed before them. Before I go on you need to know that a Hobbit is a small creature that is about  to  of our size and they are peaceful creatures that live in one place and enjoy staying were they are.
The main character of the story is Frodo Baggins, a young hobbit that grew up safe until being adopted by his uncle, the famous Bilbo Baggins. If you have ever read 'The Hobbit' then you would know who he is, and if you haven't read 'The Hobbit' then I recommend that you do before reading 'The Lord of the Rings'. Anyways, after Frodo is adopted by Bilbo he lives with him for quite so time, but soon Bilbo leaves leaving young Frodo alone with the adventure in front of him. Once underway, Frodo is accompanied by 3 other hobbits, a dwarf, an elf, 2 men and the famous Gandalf the wizard. Their journey starts from the elf homeland with the new fellowship, although it is a journey just getting there as you will soon find out.
This book was one of the best books that I have ever came across, since I have never really found it easy to sit down and read a book, when I do it must be a really good book. If I were you I would read this book and if you don't like reading I think this book will even be enjoyable for you. JRR Tolkien did a wonderful job writing this book and its worth the time to read it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars We Hate Hobbit Haters!, April 13 2002
By 
Greenleaf and Baggins (Yuba City, California, USA) - See all my reviews
Anyone who does not enjoy this book most likely does not understand the use of language. Anyone who says it does not have a begining, middle or an end and/or compares it to the hobbit obviously lacks the knowledge that The Fellowship of the Ring is the begining to the ongoing story that is The Lord of the Rings. As for The Hobbit, it is one story, one part, it is the prelude to The Lord of the Rings, which is one story, three parts. And all three parts are very good...very entertaining...very WONDERFUL. Generally speaking, The Lord of the Rings was intended for an intelligent audience. If you have a vocabulary of 350 words or more...CONGRATULATIONS...this book is for you.
Some people may argue that Tolkien created hollow characters, that is a falsity. He, in fact, created complex characters. They each have very different personallities and internal torment (at times in the book). Gandalf is an exception to this because Tolkien does not want you to know more about him than the characters. His personallity is mysterious, it would take away from the suprises in the story if it were any other way.
Tolkien's advid decription of the characters' surroundings gives reality to the story. Some may say it is excessive, however, without it the story would lack individuality (which is why it it so great in the first place). Most readers are used to seeing this: "The door knob was shiney." Tolkien readers would see this: "The glistening morning sun reflected cheerily off the now luminous surface of the door knob." (This line is not in anyway of/by or related to Tolkien and is only intended to give a vague idea of his writting style.)
He uses literary devices to enrich his stories much like the ancient Greek poet Homer. (Do not let this referance of history discourage you from reading this book.) THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING IS NOT BORING IN ANYWAY, SHAPE OR FORM! It is magnificently entertaining to the last page...AND BEYOND! We recommend this book to anyone who loves a good fantasy epic (and anyone else with the capability to read. Do not overlook this book, hidey ho!
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The Fellowship Of The Ring: The Lord Of The Rings Part 1
The Fellowship Of The Ring: The Lord Of The Rings Part 1 by J.R.R. Tolkien (Paperback - Nov. 20 1997)
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