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5.0 out of 5 stars Good book - great message
Definitely a good book with a great message. Heavy on statistics and studies. Like others have said, the chapter about what can be done to help change some of the materialistic values of our society was a great read. It is amazing how materialistic our society is. Just look at all the ads around you, painted on buses, in stadiums, on billboards, on TV, on the Internet, in...
Published on March 18 2004 by A. Wiersch

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2.0 out of 5 stars Dry and academic
The two stars are because the author DOES prove his point. However, I had hoped for an interesting read as well, and didn't get it. It reads like a scientific study by a graduate student. What a pity it wasn't written for the general public, because we all need his messsage!
Published on July 22 2002


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5.0 out of 5 stars Good book - great message, March 18 2004
This review is from: The High Price of Materialism (Paperback)
Definitely a good book with a great message. Heavy on statistics and studies. Like others have said, the chapter about what can be done to help change some of the materialistic values of our society was a great read. It is amazing how materialistic our society is. Just look at all the ads around you, painted on buses, in stadiums, on billboards, on TV, on the Internet, in magazines, and in schools. True happiness and fulfillment cannot come from materialism.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read, April 7 2003
Tim Kasser's subject in this book is the relationship between materialist values and psychological well-being. He and his colleagues have done a significant amount of work to identify links between materialism and a host of social evils, including the breakdown of the American family, our culture's lack of concern for the environment, and declining social consciousness. Some elements of the argument are weakened by the fact that psychologists have been studying the subject for a comparatively short time, and relevant studies are few; however, Kasser admits this failing when it is relevant, and support for the most important aspects of his theory is significant.
The most interesting part of the book is the final chapter, "Making Change", which discusses strategies for changing our values. In this chapter, Kasser notes the danger in assuming capitalism and the market economy are ideal. He points to experiments in the United States and throughout the world where economies have developed which emphasize small businesses and local economies (Ithaca, NY, for example), which value each person's time equally (i.e., an hour of legal services is not valued more highly than an hour of a gardener's time), and so forth. Naturally there are barriers to some of his suggestions, but there is little hope of effecting change without adopting at least some of the strategies mentioned.
All in all, this is an important book for our times. Television and mass-market culture won't save you: pick up this book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Academic but Engaging, Jan. 9 2003
By A Customer
I have to disagree with the reader from the Canary Islands. This book is an academic account about this important topic, but is anything but dry. For anyone wondering why feelings of alienation are so pervasive in our society, this book has the answer. Kasser's final chapter on "Making Change" is a gem.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile addition to the literature on this topic., Dec 9 2002
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I found this to be a powerful book. What I appreciated most in this book was that the author wasn't just giving his opinions, but that he cited extensive research to back up his assertions. I've read a few books lately on materialism, and while some were written in a more accessible style, this one answered some of my basic questions about why people behave as they do, and what they are thinking. He also connected materialism to broader issues such as social cohesiveness and environmental resource use that other books, noteably "Dematerializing" ignore to their detriment.
It is not a "breezy" read, but the content is well worth it.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Dry and academic, July 22 2002
By A Customer
The two stars are because the author DOES prove his point. However, I had hoped for an interesting read as well, and didn't get it. It reads like a scientific study by a graduate student. What a pity it wasn't written for the general public, because we all need his messsage!
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The High Price of Materialism
The High Price of Materialism by Tim Kasser (Paperback - Aug. 29 2003)
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