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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To remember how to fly read this book
Just How Do I Describe This Book?
I have read a few short stories by Clive Barker - all based in the horror genre. I found this one in a box in the basement and it has been sitting around for awhile now. Because I tend to fly through books I finally picked it up and decided to give it a try. I was not let down and it has now become one of my favorite books.
It...
Published on Feb. 11 2004 by smoothsailing327

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful But Tainted Vision
Weaveworld is a bludgeoning fusion of occult schlock-horror and heroic fantasy and is populated by a motley of vividly depicted characters. Cal and Suzanna's mundane entry on the scene contrasts effectively with the other-worldly horrors than ensue. The intriguing child/man Nimrod provides some humerous tableaux. Immacolata provides us with a deliciously evil...
Published on Feb. 9 2000 by Cartimand


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To remember how to fly read this book, Feb. 11 2004
By 
"smoothsailing327" (Methuen, MA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
Just How Do I Describe This Book?
I have read a few short stories by Clive Barker - all based in the horror genre. I found this one in a box in the basement and it has been sitting around for awhile now. Because I tend to fly through books I finally picked it up and decided to give it a try. I was not let down and it has now become one of my favorite books.
It is called, on the flyleaf, a Horror story as well as one of Fantasy. I figured it would have the usual Barker tang to it and I was very wrong. This story is one of pure magical fantasy. If there is horror it is in the evil of the Cuckoo's world (humankind) against that of the Weaveworld or the Fugue. A land of magic - where you can "fly."
There are many characters and a few plot lines to follow around in this maze. Almost as if you are running a race - good against "evil" in an attempt to save this world of magic. At times I felt as if I was truly lost in the book and the world, a very good sign that I have found a good book.
There is magic, enchantments, raptures, a carpet, and cuckoo's as well as a Incantatrix, a salesman and a very sandy Scourge. The story is made up within the weave of a carpet that makes up Wonderland.
If you find yourself remembering the times when you could fly, or when sitting in the backyard as a child you imagined you saw something colorful flitting just out of the corner of your eye. When you knew there was something else to this world and what's more, when you believed it all to be true - then you will enjoy this book. Because it takes you back to that time and helps you find that child again.
This is the first Literary Corner I've done that I've had trouble finding words to describe the book. I think it defies description because of what it is - an adventure of the imagination.
And as the story ends, "nothing ever begins. And this story, having no beginning, will have no end."
I can't wait to pick it up again in a few years and renew that magic. While in the meantime trying to remember that it is all around me - I just need to open my eyes a little more.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Pure Venture of the Imagination, July 6 2004
By 
Alexander Babbie (Dannemora, NY United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
After reading Barker's other fantasy epic, Imajica; I couldn't wait to get my hands on Weaveworld, and now that I'm done reading it I am convinced that Barker is one of the most talented authors alive.
Calhoun Mooney, a 20 something freespirit, accidentally falls into a magic carpet which serves as a refuge for the Seerkind, who have been hunted by mankind (Cuckoos) throughout history for their special abilities. Cal's fall into the carpet sets into motion an epic controntation for the carpet and the wonders it contains. With the aid of the beautiful Suzanna, whose connection to the carpet is deeper than she can possibly realize, Cal must protect the carpet from Immacolata, an "Inncantrix" who once ruled the carpet; Shadwell, a salesman by nature who considers the carpet the ultimate prize; and the Scourge, an ultimate evil whose very existence is tied to the extinction of the Seerkind.
If all that doesn't make too much sense, don't worry...its not supposed to at first glance, and that's the wonderful part reading Barker...he has such a wonderful imagination and is able to convey his imagination so well, that the only real way to understand what his books are about is to read them. Barker also has a gift for making wonderfully complex "villans" that never fail to dazzle. By the end of the story, even the Scourge, which was the ultimate evil to the Seerkind was able to provoke profound empathy from me over the emptiness and sadness that it felt.
Anyone who enjoys fantasy, horror, or simply a good yarn will love this book. Admittedly it does start out somewhat slow, but the pace soon picks up and you will not be able to put it down.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Fantasy-Romance for People Who Don't Read Fantasy-Romances, March 2 2004
By 
C. T. Mikesell (near Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
Initially I was surprised that Weaveworld wasn't the horror story I expected it to be. Then I was surprised how much I was enjoying it anyway.
Certainly there are elements of horror: The Rake, The Hag, The Magdalene and her Offspring, and The Scourge/Uriel - but this is primarily a love story between Cal and Suzanna. Their relationship is remarkable if for no other reason than the fact that it can never be fully consummated (unlike most of the casual relationships Cal and Suzanna have with others, which can and often are).
From suburban London to the Scottish Highlands to the Arabian desert, the story covers all this ground, plus the fantastic settings within the weave (The Fugue) itself. The pacing is fairly quick, but Barker does take the time to insert a descriptive paragraph or nice turn of phrase now and then. Characters are well-drawn, but there isn't a whole lot of development demonstrated over the course of the novel. Cal becomes obsessed with the carpet, but doesn't really change as he pursues or attains it. Suzanna gets super-powers almost as soon as she comes on the scene, so there isn't even much "before" and "after" as she comes to grips with them.
The book has a few other flaws, as well. Barker consistently uses the crassest term imaginable for the part of female anatomy euphemistically referred to on the TV-show Scrubs as the "bajingo." There are some pretty big plot holes as well; for instance, at one point a psychic attack is accidentally launched against an innocent London population; later, when such an attack would come in handy, no one suggests "doing what we did back in London." Wasn't it Chekov who said, "If you establish mind-altering super-powers in the beginning of the book you have to make an attempt to use them in a crucial moment by the end of the book"? Words to that effect, at any rate.
Subject matter and material aside, this is still a very good fantasy story. Romance fans will find a lot to recommend it. Horror fans may find themselves pleasantly surprised.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing Ever Begins, Nov. 12 2003
By 
This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
And with that line we pick up on this story without a beginning and without an end.
We meet Calhoun Moody and Suzannah Parrish. Two people who come together. Cal, who lives with his depressed dad and pigeons. And Suzannah who travels from England to at the wish of a cryptic note from her Grandmother she barely knew. She finds her on her death bed. These two are brought together during a run in with a human salesman and the incantatrix Immacolata, who is using the salesman for her will. They are after a carpet. A carpet that houses the Seerkind. Immacolata was once one of them, but she escape now she want them destroyed.
And so the story goes from there. Suzannah (who receives part of Immacolata's menstruum, and thus some of her powers), and Mad Mooney must get this carpet back from those two eveil people. They are met by a few stragglers from "The Fugue" who help (and don't help) the two on their journey. This is an epic fantasy novel that could rival classics like The Riftwar Saga and The Lord of the Rings.
Clive Barker uses his masterful writing to paint us a beautifl image of England as well as The Fugue, the two places that most of the story is told in. And the words all weave together to tell this wonderful story. And if reading that last three paragraghs doesn't bring a tear to your face as you finally close this chapter of the adventure, I don't know *what* will.
You owe it to yourself to pick this wonderful book up and give it a read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, Nov. 22 2002
This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
Clive Barker is a genius. I've been reading him for years and he never ceases to impress me. I just read Weaveworld about three weeks ago. This was such a fabulous book. I could not put it down. Barker writes with such style, such pure artsistry, that he pulls you in and doesn't let you come up for air until the book is finished.
Barker brings us the story of Cal, a man working a complacent job at an insurance firm who one day loses his prize pigeon in a whirl of chaos and confusion that leads him into the grips of the fugue. The Fugue is a place of wonders, a home to the Seerkind, a race of magical beings that can bring magic to life at their very fingertips. Cal falls in love with their race and his human companion whose grandmother kept hold of the fugue in a woven rug for decades.
From their we experience adventure, terror, love, tragedy, and about every emotion one can think of. This book was a godsend and a classic piece of literature. Barker has a mind like no other, and he has my very deepest respect. This book was miraculous!
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2.0 out of 5 stars Some wonderful ideas, but not very well written., Jan. 28 2002
By 
Peter Hunt (Mountain View, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
_Weaveworld_ was the first Clive Barker novel I read, and it was almost the last. While the novel has some compelling and original ideas, there were aspects of the writing style which bothered me so much I almost didn't finish it.
The story concerns a faerie world, called the fugue, hidden in a large carpet. There are demonic and human forces in our world trying to find and destroy it. Cal and Suzanna, the two main human characters, discover the carpet and become its protectors. Barker populates the fugue with strange and wonderful characters and places, and makes the evil forces trying to destroy it equally horrific and repellent.
However, I felt like the novel was too fast-paced. Monumental events would occur, only to be undone a fraction of the book later. Character situations would change before I could understand or empathize with the current ones. Also, I found some aspects of Barker's writing to be awkward and clumsy. For example, more than a few times he would have a character reflect on recent (offstage) events in order to fill the reader in.
Since finishing _Weaveworld_, I've started _The Great and Secret Show_, and the improvement in writing style is striking. If you're considering trying Barker, I would recommend skipping this novel, and trying one of his others.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant! Masterfully done!, Sept. 23 2001
This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
My first book by him and I can assure you that Clive Barker is a master story teller with a privileged imagination that leads you to the distant reaches of the mind and brings you back anew.
Barker mixes de Sade, Poe and Carroll to bring us the incredible story of the Fugue, a magical realm where harm is but a shadow and miracles are the regular coin, a world whose people were once hunted down by an unnamable creature called the Scourge and so had to find refuge in a magical carpet of complex geometrical designs, forever secure in and endless dream of frozen time. Until one day, that last guardian of the carpet dies.
Barker introduces us to a wide arrange of characters with rich personalities and their own personal problems. We have the chance to met Cal, the melancholic poet/dreamer; Susana, the last link between the salvation of the Fugue or its eternal destruction; Immacolata, the mysterious wraith; Shadwel, perhaps the most twisted and corrupted character I've read about in what goes of this year; And my personal favorite, Hobart, the control freak with a disturbed mind tormented by existentialism.
The most interesting premise about this book is the wide arrange of mysteries left without clarification at the end of the book: What is the Scourge and the ruins it guards in the unfathomable deepness of the dessert? Who is Hobart? Why that blind fanaticism replaced by a sudden sense of humility? From where did the Scourge and the Seerkind come? The reader is left alone to ponder at the questions, and Mr. Barker doesn't seem to be ready to spill out the answers entirely, so your guess is as good as mine's.
That which can be imagined need not be forgotten!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Imagination Within Reach, June 20 2001
By 
Shaun Williams (Albuquerque, NM United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
Weaveworld is the story of an artifact known as the fugue, a carpet that hides a land of imagination. It is the final refuge for the magical people of the world, the Seerkind. They have been driven from reality by a mysterious creature known as The Scourge and the greedy and ignorant "cuckoos" of everyday life. The fugue protects the wonderful forces that defy logic. It is a land that almost every reader will want to visit. The seerkind cannot rest undisturbed, however. They find themselves in a two way conflict, with the twisted beings spawned in the darkness of the imagination, and worse, the urge of humankind to supress the irrational and crush the creative. A normal man named Calhoun Mooney stumbles upon the secret of the fugue, realizes its importance, and does everything in his power to protect it from the magic wielding villainess, Immacolata, and her human assistant, Shadwell, a clever and insincere salesman. Mooney is not enough to stop them, but he meets Suzanna, a woman with a link to the world of magic.
Some of the other critics would debate my choice of five stars, but I believe they are well deserved. There are some complaints about sexual content,(almost certainly concerning the Magdalene)but I believe it is inserted to represent a dark region of the subconscious. The sexuality is presented with an almost Freudian purpose rather than with the simple objective of shock value. The one complaint in common with readers that dislike Weaveworld is that they don't care what happens to the fugue, a land representing freedom from the tyranny of the rational mind and the bonds of society. If you have no desire to travel to such a place and no interest in its preservation, perhaps Weaveworld will not work its magic on you, but there is a chance that it may change your beliefs.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful But Tainted Vision, Feb. 9 2000
By 
Cartimand (Hampshire, UK.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
Weaveworld is a bludgeoning fusion of occult schlock-horror and heroic fantasy and is populated by a motley of vividly depicted characters. Cal and Suzanna's mundane entry on the scene contrasts effectively with the other-worldly horrors than ensue. The intriguing child/man Nimrod provides some humerous tableaux. Immacolata provides us with a deliciously evil villainess, her character made all the more complex by elements of poignancy and reconciliation surrounding her demise, and the chief miscreant - Shadwell is an effective personification of the "all power corrupts..." maxim.
The sheer vileness though of some of the apparitions that Barker conjures forth demands the reader possess a strong stomach and reminds us that, first and foremost, this is a horror novel. What else should we expect from the author who gave us the visceral terrors of Hellraiser? The tale is also frequently punctuated by explicit (and some may say unnecessarily gratuitous) sexual imagery, which some may find tasteless.
One major problem I had with Weaveworld is that I felt it reached its peak about two thirds of the way through. The most satisfying chapters are undoubtedly Cal and Suzanna's adventures in the Fugue and their heart-stopping flight to keep out of Shadwell and Hobart's clutches. Once the Fugue is unwoven though and the Seerkind scattered, the tale seems to lose direction somewhat. In particular the appearance of the entity calling itself Uriel really doesn't seem to fit comfortably with what has gone before and reads more like a novella in its own right. I'm afraid for me, the conclusion of the Uriel episode reminded me of some of Star Trek's more hackneyed finales, and I must confess to feeling slightly cheated by the rather tame conclusion.
Overall though, Weaveworld is undoubtedly a pretty compelling read and reminds one of some of the more macabre paintings of Bosch or Breughal brought to life. Be warned though; it often plumbs the depths of depravity and the aftertaste it leaves may be something less wholesome than the sweet nectar of Jude pears!
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5.0 out of 5 stars "That which can be imagined need never be lost...", Jan. 15 2000
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
...and your imagination will never want to lose the excellence of this book. I have just finished reading Weaveworld for the third time and still find myself at a loss for words to capture its brilliance. Really, it defies explanation. Barker has created what I consider to be one of his greatest novels, heck! it's almost THE greatest novel. Its immensity allows its creator to use every aspect of great story telling to leave you feeling like you've just experienced something divine. It is an epic adventure of monumental proportions into a great secret world called 'The Fugue', that has been hidden away in order to elude its notorious enemies. Following the exploits of the two main characters, Cal and Suzanna, it tells us how they unravel (literally) the secrets behind the Weaveworld. This brings them into contact with some of Barkers most timeless and unforgettable characters, more notably so Immacolata and her side-kick the shifty salesman Shadwell. Mysterious, magical, loveable and terrifying - this book has it all. I particulaly love this book because of 'The Orchard of Lemuel Lo', with its entertaining magic and Jude Pears. A part of the book Clive Barker based on a early personal experience. It's just such a great chapter, magical in its peculiarities and believable by its veracity.
There are moments of exquisite tenderness and poetry in this book and moments that will have you practically tearing the page to turn it and find the answers to the many questions Barker poses throughout. The story will take you beyond reality, beyond fiction, beyond poetry and beyond fantasy to deliver you to an ambience that will intice, elate and overwhealm you. You will truly wish the story to never end, which in a way it never does - you have to experience it to understand. Suffice it to say Weaveworld is Heaven of a different form, only read it if you have plenty of breath to catch, tears to cry and imagination to be inspired, stretched and truly amazed.
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