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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hard to put down
This is one of the best books that I have read in a long while. Its descriptions of a zombie holocaust and the worldwide response to it is realistic.

The book is a collection of short stories told as a post war interview of survivors.

Stories range from all over the world(including outer space)a young soldier who recounts the disastrous battle of...
Published on Sept. 15 2006 by Terence Tan Co

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Not my cup of tea
I admit it... I purchased this book due to the hype behind the movie and was very disappointed. It's not what I expected in the least with it being more of a compiled report from around the world as events took place rather than a fluent storyline with a cast of characters you can get behind. And the solution to the Zombie infestation was rather off the wall.
Published 14 months ago by Amazon Customer


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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hard to put down, Sept. 15 2006
By 
Terence Tan Co "tetsuo79" (Vancouver) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is one of the best books that I have read in a long while. Its descriptions of a zombie holocaust and the worldwide response to it is realistic.

The book is a collection of short stories told as a post war interview of survivors.

Stories range from all over the world(including outer space)a young soldier who recounts the disastrous battle of Yonkers where "shock and awe" tactics failed in the face of mindless undead hordes to the actions of the Chinese submarine commander.

What surprised me is the great amount of sympathy the reader gets when he reads some of the heart breaking tales in the book and even some of the ironic and even surprise twists that you get after some of the stories(eg. the twist at the end of the one about the inventor of the Redekker plans leaves a lot of questions and is quite unexpected).

Even after two readings, I was left with the feeling that I would like to know more about the world of world war z...Its a feeling rarely found in many a book...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than expected, Feb. 14 2009
By 
Propaganda is Painless (Vancouver, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Paperback)
This book is far better than any book about zombies has a right to be. A collection of stories, featured documentary style from the survivors of the fictional zombie affliction that nearly destroyed mankind. While the zombie war was fictional, it reads very real throughout this book. You feel as if these stories come from real survivors of a real catastrophy. Funny, clever, horrific - you get it all here. Surprisingly very very good.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Far Better than Expected... and Highly Reccommended!, March 4 2007
By 
T. Smith (Toronto) - See all my reviews
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After reading and discussing this book with others, I now find there is a significant subculture surrounding Zombie lore, that I wasn't familiar with.

I bought the book sight-unseen (not a huge zombie afficionado), thinking that it would be good popcorn for a vacation; I was exceedingly surprised at what I was reading.

The zombies are there for sure, but they are really tertiary plot devices to the fantastic narrative, and the personal stories and scenarios that Brooks uses to tell the tale. Because the book is completely anecdotal, there isn't a traditional plot - yet you keep flipping page after page to see what insight (several aha! moments) and character might pop up next.

The only criticism I might have is the highly 'ordnance heavy' sections (Brooks likes his weapons I think), but even then - it is a war, and it interesting to see how traditional tools of destruction are unable to match the "Z's" tenacity.

Kudos Brooks! An excellent work, engaging and innovative. A must read for anyone that has ever wondered "if they move so slow, why don't you just run away?".

TMS
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, May 29 2008
This review is from: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Paperback)
For starters, I'm not a fan of zombie movies. However, my dad had left this book lying around one day and started to read it. It was one of those few books that grabbed my full attention from start to end. I thought it was a very good read. I do read a lot and finish most books, but this was one of those few books that I've read cover-to-cover in a while without getting bored during the process.

It is told as a report on the Zombie Wars, written in first-person accounts of the war that took place in a not so distant future. I enjoyed how the author unfolded the story, with different patches coming together and eventually creating this huge world.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read, Oct. 12 2006
By 
J. Friesen "Avid Reader" (Edmonton, Alberta Canada) - See all my reviews
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This book is essentially a description of a future war with hordes of zombies told via interviews and news clips. Of course, for the narrative, they all take place well after the event, but the collection is enrapturing. Sometimes, some of the best parts of a movie about zombies, are the news clips and interviews the characters see on TV/hear on the radio, and that's basically what this book is all about.

From the interviews with soldiers fighting drug lords in Central Asia and doctors trying to stem the 'disease' in China, to action reports from the front lines of troops fighting the zombies to average citizens telling their tales of survival, it is a collection of anecdotes that are sometimes humourous, terrifying, or just plain intriguing.

A good solid read that kept me turning the pages until late into the night.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Zombies of the Blogosphere, Oct. 7 2010
By 
Jonathan Stover (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Paperback)
Oh, zombie, where is thy sting? Brooks' novel was a sensation a few years back, in part because it unfolds the story of the great Zombie war within a fictionalized oral history modelled on Studs Terkels structured oral histories of World War II, the Great Depression and other major American events. It's a clever conceit, though moving from narrator to narrator (and country to country) works against the development of suspense at points, much less horror.

More than 40 years after George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead started our never-ending fascination with zombies, the rightness of some of Romero's choices related to the wrongness of some of the choices of other zombie chroniclers only stands out more. Brooks goes with what's now become the almost cliched viral/rabies model of zombieism -- zombieism is spread by bite or by zombie body matter getting into an exposed cut or otherwise somehow getting into one's bloodstream. This probably seems like a good idea, but the number of pandemics in human history spread through these means is, roughly, zero. It's just not that effective a means of viral or bacterial propagation, which is why we don't all have rabies right now.

Romero, of course, never explained what was actually causing zombies in his first two zombie movies. More importantly, there was no 'Patient Zero' style beginning point -- one day, everyone who ever died and had enough flesh left on his or her bones to allow for mobility rose from the grave. And everyone who died after that, regardless of cause of death, would also rise from the dead. Now that's a disease vector that could overwhelm civilization!

Brooks' viral model, on the other hand, doesn't bear too much hard thinking because one realizes that between the limits of propagation and the modest limits of his zombies' intelligence (they are, if anything, much stupider than Romero's slow-moving hordes), most of the book's apocalyptic scenarios would be impossible. How do these slow-moving hordes which have a tendency to fall off, into or over any obstacle in their way manage to form up into gigantic masses of tens of millions of zombies in the American Midwest and other locations? I have no idea. It seems to me that these zombies would probably end up at the bottom of every cliff, hill, overpass and canyon in the world. So it goes. Several weeks into the zombie war, one would imagine the Grand Canyon would be full of zombies.

There are a lot of pleasures in this book, and the verisimilitude Brooks achieves with his technical research into weapons and various survival issues is impressive, but the whole thing falls apart if one thinks too hard about those million-zombie armies. So don't. Recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic depiction of a post epidemic world, Jan. 18 2009
This review is from: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Paperback)
Max Brooks does a breathtaking job of rendering a world that has experienced an outbreak. The outbreak of course being zombies. This book dives into the many human factors of a worldwide epidemic/war. It goes into the medical, military, political, and civilian involvements of "World War Z". The book is told through a series of first hand accounts by people who participated and survived the war. Max Brooks does a great job of capturing the emotions and environment of these people...its very descriptive, and makes it feel as if you were there. For zombie lovers, and thriller lovers a like, this is a must read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, July 16 2009
By 
This review is from: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Paperback)
If ever there is a zombie outbreak, I will be one of those prepared. Great book for anyone looking to learn from a surprisingly well thought out, fictitious look at the world's response to a zombie outbreak. I'm a fan of zombie fiction, and this book is great in that is takes a look at the responses to the crisis from all around the world, from the point of view of the survivors. A must for anyone who is interested in the genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most enjoyable book in a long time, Sept. 7 2009
This review is from: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Paperback)
This is the most creative, enjoyable book I have read in a long time. I read fiction, love fantasy and sci-fi, and World War Z was riveting. The story is presented as short interviews to chronicle the Zombie War. Beautiful mix of modern social/political issues with...near extinction by zombies. Wasn't sure what to think about this book, so I took a chance. Loved it. Highly recommended.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not just for the gore-hounds, Feb. 22 2011
By 
Andre Farant (Ottawa, Ontario) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Paperback)
Written as a series of interviews with survivors of and key players in a recent battle to overthrow a zombie outbreak, World War Z is a fascinating and fresh take on a subject that has slowed to a lazy shamble and begun to show clear signs of rot and decrepitude. Brooks examines every possible ramification of a world-wide undead takeover, from its outbreak and dissemination to the eventual turning of the zombie tide.

The novel is a sort of natural history of the zombie apocalypse. It is serious; treating the subject as a journalist would, examining it from a socio-political perspective while focusing on the human element by drawing from interviews with "real" people. It reads like well-written narrative non-fiction piece.

The author, Max Brooks (son of Mel) offers an imaginative and innovative take on the zombie subgenre. It is entertaining without succumbing to the dead, rotting weight of gratuitous gore. It is thought-provoking without cladding itself in the greasy patina of preachiness or doom-saying. In fact, it is inherently optimistic, the narrator's research beginning only after we, the living, have won. World War Z is by far the most accessible zombie story I have ever encountered, likely to appeal not only to horror and dark fantasy enthusiasts but to a wide range of readers.
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World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War
World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks (Paperback - Oct. 16 2007)
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