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3.5 out of 5 stars20
3.5 out of 5 stars
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on March 9, 2016
Probably his best book next to Widow for One Year.
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on February 4, 2016
John Irving has some winners and some losers. This one is right in the middle but there's always something to make you think.
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on October 21, 2015
One of Irving's best! The story is interesting and as per usual his characters are intriguing and well developed.
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on October 3, 2015
It was a bit of a slow read but did keep me interested in the outcome of the different relationships involved.
Interesting character study of the persons lives and how they evolved through time and experience and the reaction
of each to events.
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on April 4, 2015
great book and service
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on December 12, 2014
This was not as good as I was anticipating - liked his earlier works much better.
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on November 24, 2014
One of John Irving's best novels. Wonderful characters that you never want to say goodbye to. Impeccable research on time, place and in particular Irving manages to convey the minutiae of our characters daily lives. Their jobs, their relationships, all are exquisitely presented.

If you liked A Prayer for Owen Meany, (still my personal fave) or The Cider House Rules, you will love this beautiful story.
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on March 29, 2014
Beautifully written and populated with interesting well developed characters. The novel demonstrates so well how a large or small decision once made influences the rest of one's life and the life of those around you and how the future is tied to the past so that some things simply become inevitable.
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on February 19, 2013
There used to be times when writers made their autobiographical novels happier and more satisfactory than their actual fate had been. Memories of good people and happy moments were supposed to compensate for their disappointments of life. Irving, on the contrary, says that he gave to his hero-writer the worst fate imaginable, a fate, which thankfully Irving himself didn't have.
An author, certainly, has the right to give any kind of life to his characters that he wants, but where, then, is any wisdom, catharsis or joy, which, supposedly, would attract the reader to the writer?
I didn't like reading this book. One would take it better if it were cleaner and clearer. I was irritated by Irving's calling his characters by their profession or by their age. E.g.(she)" believed Ketchum had loved the cook even more than the logger once loved Rosie." Would you guess that Ketchum and the logger is the same peson?
The ending is wrong. Considering that the book is full of tragedies(Danny - the writer, and every woman in it lost a child), it would be fitting if Danny had drawned in the snow storm when he went to meet Amy.
As it had not happened, one must believe that they lived happily ever after, hopefully enjoying the political development in their ex-country to the brim.
There are interesting recipes and cooking instuctions in this book.
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on November 7, 2011
The novel began like a poem, a sad, true poem about the waning days of logging. It didn't continue with the same beauty, but it was a great tale of a camp cook and his son encountering tragedy and running from the possible consequences of an accident. The often over-the-top story line in Last Night was made almost believable because of Irving's amazing ability to bring his characters to life. The four generation story of ordinary life back-dropped with melodrama was made especially interesting for me when I found out that some of it was somewhat auto-biographical. Also, the news (for me) that he writes from beginning to end (after writing the last sentence of the book first) without a rewrite explains a lot. There was some poorly integrated scenes and some ineffective repetition that an editor should have nixed. Because he spent very little time characterizing the last generation son, it seemed uneven. However, I am always eager to read the next sentence that John Irving writes. It is always an adventure.
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