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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "For the dead travel fast"
Surprisingly "Denn die Toten reiten schnell" or "For the dead travel fast" is more than an opening line to this tale of love in the dangerous moon light. After watching several Drac movies and a few Nosferatu's, I pretty much though I had a handle on the genera. Little did I know what a wonderful world of mystery and suspense that Bram Stoker opened up for me...
Published on July 25 2010 by bernie

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars To read for education, not for pleasure
Dracula wasn't either the first or the best vampire story, but it was the first that was wildly popular. There are many reasons for its popularity, among other things because it was pretty racy for the time. Also, the vampire theme was and still is a very compelling and manifold subject. However, I suspect there is another reason for its popularity. Stories like...
Published on April 26 2000 by samarand


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "For the dead travel fast", July 25 2010
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Surprisingly "Denn die Toten reiten schnell" or "For the dead travel fast" is more than an opening line to this tale of love in the dangerous moon light. After watching several Drac movies and a few Nosferatu's, I pretty much though I had a handle on the genera. Little did I know what a wonderful world of mystery and suspense that Bram Stoker opened up for me.

The story is told mostly third party though the papers, diaries, and phonograph recordings (on wax cylinders) of those people involve in a tale so bizarre that it almost defies belief. The general story line is that of a Count that plans to move to a more urban setting (from Borgo Pass to London) where there is a richer diet. There he finds succulent women; something he can sing his teeth in. Unfortunately for him a gang of ruffians (including a real-estate agent, asylum director, Texas cowboy and an Old Dutch abnormal psychologist) is out to detour his nocturnal munching. They think they have Drac on the run but with a wing and a prayer he is always one step ahead.

Of more value to the reader is the rich prose chosen by Stoker as he describes the morals and technology of the time. We have to come to grips with or decide if we can perform the rituals that are required to eliminate vampires verses the impropriety of opening graves and staking loved ones. The powers in the book differ from the movie versions in that they are more of persuasion and capabilities to manipulate the local weather. At one point the Dutch Dr. Van Helsing, is so overwhelmed by a beautiful vampire laying in the grave that he almost for gets why he is there and may become vamp chow.

All in all the story is more in the cunning chase. And the question as to will they succeed or will Dracula triumph. Remember "For the dead travel fast."

Dracula
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For the dead travel fast, May 16 2010
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
"Dracula" was not the first vampire novel, nor was it Bram Stoker's first book.

But after years of research, Stoker managed to craft the ultimate vampire novel, which has spawned countless movies, spinoffs, and books that follow the blueprint of the Transylvanian count. Eerie, horrifying and genuinely mysterious, "Dracula" is undoubtedly the most striking and unique vampire novel yet penned.

Real estate agent Jonathan Harker arrives in Transylvania, to arrange a London house sale to Count Dracula. But as the days go by, Harker witnesses increasingly horrific events, leading him to believe that Dracula is not actually human. His fiancee Mina arrives in Transylvania, and finds that he has been feverish. Meanwhile the count has vanished -- along with countless boxes filled with dirt.

And soon afterwards, strange things happen: a ship piloted by a dead man crashes on the shore, after a mysterious thing killed the crew. A lunatic talks about "Him" coming. And Mina's pal Lucy dies of mysterious blood loss, only to come back as an undead seductress. Dracula has arrived in England -- then the center of the Western world -- and intends to make it his own...

"Dracula" is the grandaddy of Lestat and other elegantly alluring bloodsuckers, but that isn't the sole reason why this novel is a classic. It's also incredibly atmospheric, and very well-written. Not only is it very freaky, in an ornate Victorian style, but it is also full of restrained, quiet horror and creepy eroticism. What's more, it's shaped the portrayal of vampires in movies and books, even to this day.

Despite already knowing what's going on for the first half of the book, it's actually kind of creepy to see these people whose lives are being disrupted by Dracula, but don't know about vampires. It's a bit tempting to yell "It's a vampire, you idiots!" every now and then, but you can't really blame them. Then the second half kicks in, with accented professor Van Helsing taking our heroes on a quest to save Mina from Dracula.

And along the way, while our heroes try to figure stuff out, Stoker spins up all these creepy hints of Dracula's arrival. Though he wrote in the late 19th-century manner, very verbose and a bit stuffy, his skill shines through. The book is crammed with intense, evocative language, with moments like Dracula creeping down a wall, or the dead captain found tied to the wheel. Once read, they stick in your mind throughout the book.

It's also a credit to Stoker that he keeps his characters from seeming like idiots or freaks, which they could have easily seemed like. Instead, he puts little moments of humanity in them, like Van Helsing admitting that his wife is in an asylum. Even the letters and diaries are written in different styles; for example, Seward's is restrained and analytical, while Mina's is exuberant and bright.

Even Dracula himself is an overpowering presence despite his small amount of actual screen time, and not just as a vampire -- Stoker presents him as passionate, intense, malignant, and probably the smartest person in the entire book. If Van Helsing hadn't thwarted him, he probably would have taken over the world -- not the Victorian audience's ideal ending.

Intelligent, frightening and very well-written, "Dracula" is the well-deserved godfather of all modern vampire books and movies -- and its unique villain still dwarfs the more recent undead.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars To read for education, not for pleasure, April 26 2000
Dracula wasn't either the first or the best vampire story, but it was the first that was wildly popular. There are many reasons for its popularity, among other things because it was pretty racy for the time. Also, the vampire theme was and still is a very compelling and manifold subject. However, I suspect there is another reason for its popularity. Stories like "La morte amoureuse," by Théophile Gautier, and "Carmilla," by Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, preceded Dracula by many years, and, from the point of view of literary quality, they both leave Dracula eating dust, but few people have read them. The fact is, these are pretty ambiguous stories: good and evil are not separated by neat and precise borders. They are not merely scary, they are disturbing. On the other hand, Dracula is very straightforward and simplistic. On the one hand, you have Dracula, a totally evil force, on the other, the "brave men" and Mina, who represent the forces of civilization and "therefore," they are perfectly good. In this picture, Lucy and Renfield are the most interesting characters, because they are the only ones that stand in a grey area. The "message" of the story is that you can always defeat the forces of darkness, as long as you have the right technology and the right money, and as long as the powers of civilized life are on your side. This is simply not the way it works, however.
Most movie Draculas are more interesting than Stoker's Dracula. In the movies, correctly I think, they have generally tried to make Dracula more seductive, and sometimes even charming. In the book, Dracula is more like a rapist, and utterly disagreeable. You might end up rooting for him, though, disagreeable as he is, because the good guys are so nerve-grating. They are more like caricatures than real people. Harker, Seward and Lord Godalming are Ye Olde Stolid Englishmen. Mina, the "New Woman," is too much like the "Old Woman," only typing instead of sewing. But we know that they all are wonderful, because they themselves tell you so, all the time. Let's say there are some books that are important because they are good books, and others are important because of their influence: Dracula enters in the second category. I think it is still necessary to read it, for educational purposes, but not really for pleasure.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars for once I say watch the movie!, Aug. 23 2002
By 
Amazon Customer "jfritch53" (Pilot Point, TX United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dracula (Mass Market Paperback)
The idea of the vampire is fascinating, but Bram Stoker's book is not. I began reading this novel in the hopes that I might find more depth of character and plot than in the movie. But any hopes for this were demolished by the clumsy form, lack of a real narrator, and lack of character development.
At first I found the form interesting. The whole story is related through diary/journal entries by the characters, newspaper clips, telegrams, etc. Yet by the time I had read roughly 100 pages, I was growing tired of listening to the characters bubble on about their emotions, and how beautiful everyone except Dracula is.
Towards the climactic scene, the journal form begins to conflict more and more with the plot. As the actions become more time-compressed, the characters have to spend more time writing down conversations and updates to the plot. One imagines them scurrying off after anything happens to go and write it down in their diary. (I don't know anyone in real life who does this.)
Also, since he is seen through the distance of the characters' point of view, Dracula has hardly any recognizable presence in the story, except as the invisible menace. Being a boring villain, he is defeated by boring, superstitious means. What reason is there for the vampire to appear in the characters' lives anyway, unless to punish them for a wild imagination and gushing diaries?
The only character of interest is Dr. Van Helsing, especially when he speaks of an odd impulse to laughter that comes up at the most inopportune times, and when he speaks of the vampire's "child" brain.
Otherwise, the book suffers heavily from lack of a good narrator (who would perhaps scale down some of the gratuitous sentimentalism), and so I suggest watching the Francis Ford Coppolla film instead.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Lengthy But Worth Reading, Oct. 29 2013
By 
Debra Purdy Kong (British Columbia) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dracula (Paperback)
I’ve seen many versions of Dracula movies over the years, so decided it was high time to read Bram Stoker’s horror classic. I was curious to see how far the movie versions had strayed from the book. The answer, of course, depends on the movie, but I now understand why cinematic versions pared down many details.

Dracula is a long read, filled with plenty of descriptions and thoughts from key players. The first third of the book is actually three separate stories told through journal entries (the entire book is told through journals). The first comes from Jonathan Harker, describing his harrowing trip to Count Dracula’s castle on legal business. The second is from Jonathan’s fiancée, Mina, and her best friend, Lucy. The third story is told by John Seward, a psychiatrist in charge of an insane asylum, who’s particularly interested in one patient. It’s this last story that most of the movie versions cut. It takes about 200 pages (the book was 605 pages on my iPad) for all three stories to converge. In fact, the whole Dracular-vampire revelation isn’t established until the halfway point.

Still, Stoker intricately weaves all three storylines together while introducing Van Helsing. Despite the pace, the suspense does build, and the action scenes are riveting. It’s just that there are few of them. Stoker focuses on building suspense about whether Dracula will be destroyed in time rather than the battle with Dracula himself. I might be spoiled, but in the movies, the more important the evil player, the longer and more desperate the battle. Still, the book. was a good read this Halloween month.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Dracula rules!, Sept. 17 2013
By 
Amazon Customer (vancouver ,canada) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dracula (Paperback)
Beautiful copy!! I am beyond happy ,these editions are fantastic and functional ! Dracula is also one of my favorite 19th century novels of all time, reading this will be stylin'!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Difficult Read. But Worth The Effort, Aug. 27 2012
By 
Koopa90 (Cape Breton, NS.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dracula (Hardcover)
I was very surprised with how good this book really was. Especially for its time.
In the age we live now, with technology and knowledge of history and a possible future, we have so much we can write about.
But to return to Bram Stoker's time and write this book, I thought it would be a difficult task to write something as good as Dracula.

For too long Ive been Anti-Vampire with all this Twilight crap going on.
I decided to ignore it all and go back to where it all began, the King of the Vampires.
Bram Stoker's original story of DRACULA.

Though, it has its flaws, it mainly comes down to the way it is written.
Its almost impossible (or was for me) when there were pages about a conversation with something with an accent, and Bram Stoker made sure he spelt every word as who ever was speaking would say it. Plenty of letters missing an apostrophes in their place.

The first 50 pages really reeled me into the story, but unfortunately, after that, it took a good 200 pages before I became interested in the story once more.

Ive never seen a DRACULA movie, apart from the spoof 'Dead and Loving It' Which really didnt follow the story that much, so there were not many spoilers from that. This was a good read, though difficult at times. I highly recommend it to anyone willing to give this classic a chance. Glad ive read it and can add it to my collection.

Additional: This Leather Binding arrived in bad condition for me although it was said to be NEW. Though I didnt mind the little nicks here and there, Im just giving anyone who purchases it in future a heads up on the possibly condition of this fragile book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Well at least the book is good, June 14 2012
This review is from: Dracula (Paperback)
Well I bought this book to be a gift for someone and they really loved the book but when I was going to purchase the book it says to click and you could read exerpts from the book before buying. So I did that and what I read was great. It had a detailed history and account of the author and how they came to think of doing the book and things like that. It sounded really interesting that even I was interested in reading the book.
So when the book actually came, I was pretty mad when I noticed that the book was "Dracula" but not the one that I had originally wanted to purchase. The picture of the book versus the exerpts were from different books. If I had wanted just the regular "Dracula" without all the extra stuff about the history in the beginning I could have just gone to any store to buy it instead of doing it online, paying the shipping and waiting for so long. I was choked!

Please make sure that the author and editor and edition of the book that you want is the one that see before you make the same disappointing mistake I did.
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5.0 out of 5 stars For the dead travel fast, Feb. 20 2012
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: Dracula (Hardcover)
"Dracula" was not the first vampire novel, nor was it Bram Stoker's first book. But he managed to craft the ultimate vampire novel, which has spawned countless movies, spinoffs, and books that follow the blueprint of the Transylvanian count. Eerie, horrifying and genuinely mysterious, "Dracula" is undoubtedly the most striking and unique vampire novel yet penned.

Real estate agent Jonathan Harker arrives in Transylvania, to arrange a London house sale to Count Dracula. But as the days go by, Harker witnesses increasingly horrific events, leading him to believe that Dracula is not actually human. His fiancee Mina arrives in Transylvania, and finds that he has been feverish. Meanwhile the count has vanished -- along with countless boxes filled with dirt.

And soon afterwards, strange things happen: a ship piloted by a dead man crashes on the shore, after a mysterious thing killed the crew. A lunatic talks about "Him" coming. And Mina's pal Lucy dies of mysterious blood loss, only to come back as an undead seductress. Dracula has arrived in England -- then the center of the Western world -- and intends to make it his own...

"Dracula" is the grandaddy of Lestat and other elegantly alluring bloodsuckers, but that isn't the sole reason why this novel is a classic. It's also incredibly atmospheric, and very well-written. Not only is it very freaky, in an ornate Victorian style, but it is also full of restrained, quiet horror and creepy eroticism. What's more, it's shaped the portrayal of vampires in movies and books, even to this day.

Despite already knowing what's going on for the first half of the book, it's actually kind of creepy to see these people whose lives are being disrupted by Dracula, but don't know about vampires. It's a bit tempting to yell "It's a vampire, you idiots!" every now and then, but you can't really blame them. Then the second half kicks in, with accented professor Van Helsing taking our heroes on a quest to save Mina from Dracula.

And along the way, while our heroes try to figure stuff out, Stoker spins up all these creepy hints of Dracula's arrival. Though he wrote in the late 19th-century manner, very verbose and a bit stuffy, his skill shines through. The book is crammed with intense, evocative language, with moments like Dracula creeping down a wall, or the dead captain found tied to the wheel. Once read, they stick in your mind throughout the book.

It's also a credit to Stoker that he keeps his characters from seeming like idiots or freaks, which they could have easily seemed like. Instead, he puts little moments of humanity in them, like Van Helsing admitting that his wife is in an asylum. Even the letters and diaries are written in different styles; for example, Seward's is restrained and analytical, while Mina's is exuberant and bright.

Even Dracula himself is an overpowering presence despite his small amount of actual screen time, and not just as a vampire -- Stoker presents him as passionate, intense, malignant, and probably the smartest person in the entire book. If Van Helsing hadn't thwarted him, he probably would have taken over the world -- not the Victorian audience's ideal ending.

As for this particular edition, it really is quite nice. The red edges and black cover really give it a gothic, vampiric feeling, while the binding, cover and bookmark add to the Victorian feel of it.

Intelligent, frightening and very well-written, "Dracula" is the well-deserved godfather of all modern vampire books and movies -- and its unique villain still dwarfs the more recent undead.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic., Feb. 12 2012
This review is from: Dracula (Paperback)
A good read, and I find the cover of this version to be very elegant. This book is the start of vampires, and so it is a must-read for anyone who enjoys vampire novels.
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Dracula
Dracula by Bram Stoker (Hardcover - May 4 2010)
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