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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is a Classic.
This would probably classify as the most favourite of all my books. As a past Literature major, I have read much, and I find an affinity with both Hesse and his Steppenwolf.
For those who would like to know what exactly the book is about, it's about a man who does not relate to society, in general. An outcast, because of his high sensitivity and talents. He...
Published on Nov. 20 2003 by Janine Koenig

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad.
Steppenwolf is the first of Herman Hesse's works I have read, and it won't be the last. Although the first 80 pages are fairly hard to get through, the rest of the book makes the trek well worth it. The "Magic Theatre" scene is one of the most imaginative pieces of literature I've ever read. However, as I said before, the first third of the book is very slow and...
Published on March 5 2004 by Nick E. Six


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is a Classic., Nov. 20 2003
This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
This would probably classify as the most favourite of all my books. As a past Literature major, I have read much, and I find an affinity with both Hesse and his Steppenwolf.
For those who would like to know what exactly the book is about, it's about a man who does not relate to society, in general. An outcast, because of his high sensitivity and talents. He doesn't relate to most people, and doesn't care to. He is a rebel. He is a genius.
It's about the Artist, the True Genius, attempting to live in a world where mediocrity reigns supreme, like the United States of America, a country where a University or Graduate education depends on making money off of students and lowering standards as a result, not true intelligence or ability; in a country where human beings worship the tv set; in a country where the President had a C- average in school. This book is still applicable in many ways to the current mediocre mentality, which is alive and well, and how the above average or superior human being cannot bear to live within such an atmosphere of stupidity, and yet must come to terms somehow.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Learning To Laugh At Life, Aug. 20 2012
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Daffy Bibliophile (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
Hesse was fifty when he wrote this book and to me that's the key. The main character, Harry Haller is approaching fifty and is going through a crisis in his life, hence this is not the stuff for college kids to read as they apparently did back in the 1960s. How could a twenty-five year old possibly understand the problems of a fifty year old???

Harry was, in my opinion, suffering from depression; in the author's note written in 1961, Hesse states that this is a story of "a disease and crisis" and ultimately a healing. Harry Haller did not feel that he fit in with society, he felt contempt for life and for bourgeois society, for the modern world. His safety valve was his razor, the knowledge that he could commit suicide whenever he wanted. Bring it on life! The emergency door is always open!

What happened next is open to debate. How much of what Harry experiences after meeting Hermine (was she real?) and Maria and Pablo - how much of all that was real to Harry? I have no idea. Reading this book was a wonderful experience despite the ups and downs, but I don't claim to fully understand it. Kinda like life, I guess.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth the effort, Nov. 3 2007
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This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Worth the effort, July 6, 2007

I read this book in 2001 when I first started making an effort to read and still remember the effect in had on me. I would read about 10 pages a night before having to put it down because in a lot of ways the story brought on a feeling of emptiness and depression similar to what the main character experienced in the story. Yet the story and the character Harry Haller made me think, look at myself and life which to me is one of the most valuable things a book, story or experience can provide a person. The story has a chance to stir your soul if you reflect on the main themes and question - what is life.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Among the best books I have ever read, April 14 2004
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This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
Outstanding. One of the best books I have ever read. An interesting examination of existentisal philosophy ( more specifically nietzsche), that really creates a sence of the isolation and alienation that is a fact of life in the modern world.
So back in the 27' Tyler Durden would have been named Hermine, the story is just as compelling and indicates that the difficulties that face those who can't just be cogs in the machine are not something new to our generation. ( Perhaps when Yam child has become Yam woman she will realize this, too ).
This story is not exciting, there is little action, it can be dull. Rather, it is a meditation on the world, the problems it creates for one who wants to maintain his individuality in the face of modernity, and the problems furthur raised by any atempt to circumvent those conditions.
This is not a book to give you answers to your journey to selfhood. It is a book to show you A way, and to give you hope that such a journey is possible. Enjoy
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad., March 5 2004
By 
Nick E. Six (Walla Walla, WA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
Steppenwolf is the first of Herman Hesse's works I have read, and it won't be the last. Although the first 80 pages are fairly hard to get through, the rest of the book makes the trek well worth it. The "Magic Theatre" scene is one of the most imaginative pieces of literature I've ever read. However, as I said before, the first third of the book is very slow and boring, as most of those pages are just Harry Haller (the main character) reading the mysterious "treatise," a strange type of analysis of Harry, which was given to him by an unknown person. The treatise is boring and hard to follow. The rest of the book is a fairly easy read and you will find yourself tearing through to the end. I would recommend this book to anyone who's into stories with a surreal edge to them. The only reason I didn't give Steppenwolf more than 3 stars was because of it's slow beginning.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carl Jung vs the Steppenwolf, Sept. 4 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
Hermann Hesse was in bad shape at this point in his life. Death of a beloved child; a turbulant marriage to a mentally deteriorating woman ending in a painful separation; his devout humanitarianism and pacifism causing him to be scorned and ostracized by a population increasingly obsessed with a very jingoistic form of German nationalism. His ensuing severe depression compell him to undergo analysis by a Jungian and to open a dialogue with Carl himself. They recommend he use his incredible narrative talents, in the framework of Jung's theory of personality, to purge himself of his demons. Steppenwolf is the result. Since narrative flow and reader accessibility were not a top priority for Hesse in this attempt at self-therapy, one has to understand Jungs ideas of the evolution of self-discovery (the road to the Immortals)and the mechanics of ego, anima, self through which this evolution takes place. Hesse, true to form, takes these psychological abstractions and breathes life into them, as Harry (ego), Hermine (anima) and Pablo/Mozart (self) compete, instruct and eventually synthesize to allow Harry (Hesse) to look past his own self-imposed limitations of father, husband, respected citizen and yes, even steppenwolf, to the rarified air of the Immortals where life's foibles produce one cosmic belly-laugh after another and give us the ability to see that "our past was not a shattering of ruins, but fragments of the divine and that our life turned not on trifles, but on stars".
One of the most powerful blueprints of the human experience ever written; mainly because it's a true story, written by one with the courage to go down this road and the skill to put what he finds on paper.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars complexity at its finest, May 3 2004
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This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
This book was a philosophical rollercoaster, if you liked Siddartha alot as i did then maybe this book isnt for you. Steppenwolf is definitly a step up on the complexity compared to Siddartha. Where as Siddartha had glimpses of philosophical insight, steppenwolf fully consisted of just that. If you are ready for a challenge then i would recommend that you dive in. I personally found myself gettin dizzy and lost in all the run-one sentences.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Blown Away, July 24 2007
By 
Megan Paige (Vancouver Island, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
This is the second piece of Hermann Hesse's work I've read. The first being Demian. Both are amazing. Steppenwolf was a much more intense read and perhaps I wasn't 100% ready for it but I found myself submersed to a level a book has never taken me before and left me euphoric. Each time I read it is on a new level. Sometimes in a more simplistic way, others much more complex. By far one of the best books I've read to date.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Wolf of the Steppes, March 5 2004
By 
Matt (Walla Walla, WA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
For the most part I liked the book but there were many times where I got really confused because the narration would jump from the nephew to Harry himself. Also random things would happen like finding the Magic Theater and the man handing him the book about himself. But things like that did keep me intersted. I didn't really like the whole section about him wanting to commit suicide either. I did find it intersting when the Steppenwolf would talk to the nephew about personal experiences. However the nephew seemed a little obsessed with the Steppenwolf because he would stay up late and listen or watch him in his room. Overall I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read a weird book and I would read it again.
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4.0 out of 5 stars steppenwolf=steppenstrange, March 2 2004
By 
p.t. bruno (Walla Walla, WA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Steppenwolf: A Novel (Paperback)
Steppenwolf, by Hermann Hesse, is a captivating, but sometimes confusing novel. It deals with the inner conflicts of Harry Haller and his split personality, the Steppenwolf.
The preface is long and drawn out, but take your time and carefully read it. You will find that it is extremely important to the development of the book. After you finish the arduous task of completing the first 25 pages, you get to take a stroll in the life of the Steppenwolf. It is a distorted look on the "bourgeois society" that Harry lives in, a post war Germany. Haller deals with ex-girlfriends, gramophones, Mozart, and a Magical Theatre that is for Madmen only. The end of the book is worth its weight in pages. If you're not a mad man by the time you get there, you will be when you're finished.
I was extremely satisfied when I completed this novel. It was hard to get through at times, but well worth getting through. Everyone that can handle a little self-analysis should definitely read Steppenwolf.
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Steppenwolf: A Novel
Steppenwolf: A Novel by Hermann Hesse (Paperback - Dec 6 2002)
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