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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh and Unique Novel from Jack Whyte
I am a die-hard fan of Jack Whyte, and love his books to peices. The point of views expressed in novels, the characters, the dialogue, the landscape, the history (presented in a none-too-boring way), the romance (and yes, even the very skanky sex) make his books both rewarding for the reader and inspiring. 'Uther' is startling different then his other Camulod Chronicle...
Published on Aug. 4 2001 by Amazon Customer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, But Not Whyte's Best
In Uther, Jack Whyte attempts to tie up all the tantalizing threads that he left dangling at the end of The Eagle's Brood. He does his best to explain the enigma of Uther, solve the mystery of Deirdre's brutal murder, and clarify the vague circumstances of Arthur's parentage. He makes a valiant effort, but comes up short.
It isn't a dismal failure. Jack Whyte is,...
Published on Sept. 14 2001 by Pat Bracewell


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh and Unique Novel from Jack Whyte, Aug. 4 2001
By 
Amazon Customer (New England, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Uther (The Camulod Chronicles, Book 7) (Hardcover)
I am a die-hard fan of Jack Whyte, and love his books to peices. The point of views expressed in novels, the characters, the dialogue, the landscape, the history (presented in a none-too-boring way), the romance (and yes, even the very skanky sex) make his books both rewarding for the reader and inspiring. 'Uther' is startling different then his other Camulod Chronicle novels.
Readers grow almost to hate Uther in books such as 'The Eagle's Brood' and 'The Saxon Shore', due to the often mistaken and harsh judgements of his infamous cousin Merlyn, from whose eyes the books are portrayed. Upon delving into 'Uther', however, I found myself not only loving his character, but approaching the other books with a new understanding. The plot is simple, unlike the other books, and instead of focusing on future plans and dreams of its characters it seems to just naturally go with the flow, following Uther's exciting, sexy, and violent life as it unfolds. Overwhelming pity is at times the strongest emotion when reading this book, as the man Jack Whyte is portraying is misunderstood and seems slighted by destiny. In all, a fabulous read. I couldn't help but read it cover to cover in one sitting, litterally not putting it down. It's a grabber.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alternative historical fiction. . ., April 22 2001
This review is from: Uther (The Camulod Chronicles, Book 7) (Hardcover)
After finishing the first six books of the Camulod Chronicles, I was both delighted and confused to see that the publication of a seventh book was imminent. Delighted because I regard Jack Whyte's Camulod Chronicles to be one of the best retellings of the Arthurian legend, confused because the title was "Uther". By the end of book 6, "The Sorcerer: Metamorphosis", Uther is long dead and his son Arthur just installed as High King of all of Britain. I ignored the anachronism and ordered the book anyway.
My faith in Jack Whyte was rewarded as "Uther" turned out to be one of the crowning jewels (sick pun intended) of the Camulod Chronicles. In the time line, "Uther" covers the same period as book 3 of the series, "The Eagle's Brood". Where "The Eagle's Brood" was told from the point of view of Merlyn, "Uther" is told from the point of view of. . . Uther. I suppose this book can be considered an alternative historical fiction, but I won't go there. . .
This book continues in the same sweeping, luxurious style of the others in the series with the only difference being in narration. The first two books were narrated by Publius Varrus, the next four my Merlyn himself. The all-seeing, all-knowing author narrates "Uther", and I feel that this point of view offers a nice change of pace in the series and works well. Although this book covers the same time period as a previous installment, the overlap of actual events is minimal. In "The Eagle's Brood", Merlyn regards Uther as a pariah. In "Uther", we are given the balancing story in which some of the major mysteries from earlier in the Chronicles are solved.
Overall, the whole series is different from most in its handling of Uther. In the original Mallory and all of the retellings I had read up to this one, the character of Uther is not a particularly well-developed one. He appears as almost an incidental character who co-incidentally sired Arthur. If he is given any ink, as in Mary Stewart's Merlin Trilogy, it is to describe him as a brusque, brutal, and lustful creature with no redeeming qualities other than his great physical strength and prowess as a warrior. Mr. Whyte has made Uther into a man of high nobility, deserving of our respect, admiration, and sympathy. And, this is only fitting if we are to consider that his son Arthur was renown for his nobility, personal strength, and sense of justice. Although Arthur never knew Uther as an adult, we all grow up hearing that the fruit seldom falls far from the tree.
I have read dozens of retellings of the Arthurian saga, and am nowhere near having my fill. I regard the Camulod Chronicles as one of the best. I look forward to reading book 8 of the chronicles as soon as it is written.
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5.0 out of 5 stars FABULOUS WRITER, Jan. 22 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Uther (Hardcover)
JACK WHYTE MESMERIZES YOU IN HIS NOVELS,GREAT WRITER
HOPE HE CONTINUES IN THIS ERA
DRAWS YOU INTO HIS WRITINGS THINKING HE WAS LIVING IN IT
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5.0 out of 5 stars Garreth Whistler (is the man), Jan. 20 2012
Awesome story that elevates Uther to equal the character development of Merlyn.

Gripping harsh reality creates a stark contrast to the romanized Camulod, the Pendragon are painted as a powerful slightly primitive society.

Oh and lots of battles :)

Read this book in a day, loved it and read it again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, But Not Whyte's Best, Sept. 14 2001
By 
Pat Bracewell (Oakland, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Uther (The Camulod Chronicles, Book 7) (Hardcover)
In Uther, Jack Whyte attempts to tie up all the tantalizing threads that he left dangling at the end of The Eagle's Brood. He does his best to explain the enigma of Uther, solve the mystery of Deirdre's brutal murder, and clarify the vague circumstances of Arthur's parentage. He makes a valiant effort, but comes up short.
It isn't a dismal failure. Jack Whyte is, after all, a remarkable writer. But it's difficult to write yourself out of a corner, and he'd boxed himself in pretty tightly at the end of Eagle's Brood. What he gives us here is at least one new character, Nemo, who is almost completely unsympathetic and whose actions are utterly bizarre and incomprehensible despite Whyte's efforts to provide good motivation. As for Uther, Whyte has only limited success at demystifying his erratic personality, mostly because the author is forced to use the third person in order to tell this part of the tale. His previous books, which are first person narratives, are much more immediate and visceral.
There are other disappointments, as well. The love scenes are painful reading, but mercifully short. Whyte's battle scenes, although written with the same painstaking detail as in previous books, are difficult reading here. The outcome is a given, and the slow progress of Uther's troops is laborious and layered in dread. This is one time where I would have appreciated a little less detail.
What does the author do right? He immerses us, once again, in a world that is brutal and black and frightening and that strikes me, anyway, as utterly realistic. Against that backdrop he sets human beings who are trying to make sense of it all, trying to create a civilization out of chaos. In this book, as in all the others, he takes myth and roots it firmly in history. It's a worthy effort, just not his best.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Arthurian legend tale, March 29 2001
By 
Harriet Klausner - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Uther (The Camulod Chronicles, Book 7) (Hardcover)
When his father died, Uther became King of Cambria ruling over the feral Pendragon tribes. At around the same time his cousin Caius Merlyn Britannicus becomes the monarch in Camulod.
However, Uther's life as the sovereign of Cambria is wrought with constant skirmishes with his offensive neighbor King Lot of Cornwall. Uther travels all over England on adventures that would destroy a lesser person especially his fights against the treacherous Lot. Still, Uther falls in love with his arranged bride, Ygraine of Ireland. Surprisingly, she returns his feelings even though she mistrusts males after being a victim of the bellicose Lot. Their love culminates with the birth of the future king.
UTHER: THE CAMULOD CHRONICLES is a fascinating look at the Arthurian legend by focusing on Arthur's parents mostly his sire. The plot is cleverly designed so that the story of the house of Uther fits quite comfortably within the previously established legend as scribed by Jack Whyte in his other Camulod Chronicles. This is a must read by Arthurian fans as is the previous works in this series, especially THE EAGLE'S BROOD (Merlyn's companion tale).

Harriet Klausner
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4.0 out of 5 stars Slow to start, but a great read overall, Aug. 13 2009
By 
Ali (wilds of canada) - See all my reviews
Needed to add my two cents to the review of this book although I notice it's been a very long time since anything new was written! I think we are very lucky here in Canada to be blessed with a writer as superlative as Jack Whyte. Although this book, "Uther" did not start strong, midway through it picks up and keeps one enthralled. Jack Whyte states in his prologue that he had difficulty with the book, and that statement often crossed my mind while reading it. How does one write a book about a somewhat integral character (in other stories) after most of the telling is done? Would it help to read this book after reading others in the series? Truly, it would as the richness and the depth of the charactersin the series is amazing, and the narrative in each and every book inspires the imagination in us all.
I, like another reviewer here had difficulty in the time lines. For example, the age differences between main characters seemed to be different at times throughout the book. I often asked myself how old Uther was really; the age at death seemed different than in the third installment of the series (wow! forgetting the name tsk, tsk!.) I kept thinking back as well to the other books and questioning whether or not characters such as Nemo and Lagan were ever referenced previously in the series. Hmmmmm.
Anyways, a great story, and I found myself slightly in tears many chapters before the end, knowing simply that the end of Uther was in fact near. Thank you Jack Whyte for creating a beautiful, complex, and fulfilling character. Thank you too for a needed addition to the "Eagle" series. Enjoy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What a wonderful discovery!, Oct. 31 2005
By 
LalaBee (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
I bought Uther before a trip that would put me on a plane for 12 hours and I needed a good book.
I picked it up and thought "this seems very interesting" and all I can say now is WOW! Like many others I have come to find, I did not know about the "Dream of Eagles" series until getting in to Uther and telling myself "I need more!" I bought the whole series which was hard because at the time some of the books were out of print, but it has been the most thoroughly entertaining thing I have vere done, no movie or book I have read even comes close.
Just try to tell me that Jack Whyte's books aren't the gospel of Arthurian Legend, you can't. Everything else falls extremely short to my vision of the story as painted by Jack Whyte.
I truly think that if you read at all, you have to love this tale and I was so happy to see the story of Uther's life told through two different perspectives after reading the series and then re-reading Uther.
I can't speak highly enough of this story and what is has done to enrich my imagination and my life, really.
Enjoy!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Uther, the best of Jack Whyte, Dec 24 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: English C-Format Uther (Paperback)
Uther is the best of the Whyte books so far. Whyte revisits the character Uther from the Singing Sword series. Told from Uther's viewpoint several happenings from previous books are explained, vindicating Uther. Uther is a much more interesting character than Merlyn--not quite so perfect. The best part is that the book is so long.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A legend come to life, March 17 2003
I discovered Jack Whyte's Dream of Eagles series quite by accident. I picked up Uther, not realizing that it was part of the series, and became thoroughly engrossed in the rich re-telling of the tale legendary Uther Pendragon.
Whyte has taken elements of the Arthurian legend and put them in plausible context, with ultimately, real-world explanations of the more fanciful elements of the Legend.
For anyone who has read book 3 (Eagles' Brood), "Uther" covers the same time period from a completely different perspective (Brood is written from the point of view of Merlin in a period of time when Uther is off fighting in Cornwall). The two books complete each other beautifully and answered some of the mysteries that remained unsolved at the conclusion of Brood.
Needless to say, I am now reading the entire series, and will likely re-read Uther having better understood the context.
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Uther (The Camulod Chronicles, Book 7)
Uther (The Camulod Chronicles, Book 7) by Jack Whyte (Hardcover - 2001)
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