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5.0 out of 5 stars This Wraith Can Write
There continue to be two types of books offered that carry the name Robert Ludlum. There is the, "Covert One", series that has been abysmal since its first appearance and has shown no signs of improvement. And there are the 11 books that it has been said he left outlines for at the time of his death. The latter series that are the traditional Ludlum fare have remained far...
Published on Oct. 15 2002 by taking a rest

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars slow moving
This story had trouble keeping my attention; it was overall a slow moving read a bit too much verbiage to keep me in full interest. But it was a fun book, a typical Ludlum novel.
Published on July 9 2007 by Toni Osborne


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5.0 out of 5 stars This Wraith Can Write, Oct. 15 2002
This review is from: The Janson Directive (Hardcover)
There continue to be two types of books offered that carry the name Robert Ludlum. There is the, "Covert One", series that has been abysmal since its first appearance and has shown no signs of improvement. And there are the 11 books that it has been said he left outlines for at the time of his death. The latter series that are the traditional Ludlum fare have remained far above the previously mentioned series, and they have been surprisingly good. "The Janson Directive", is by far the best book since the death of this author that helped define this genre. It has been clear that a new pen was introduced when the first unfinished book was completed after Ludlum's death, and with this book it is clear that from beginning to end, while possibly based on a Ludlum outline, this is another author's work. Happily whoever he/she is can really write, maintaining the storyline style that Ludlum continues to be famous for, while bringing a more contemporary flair to the work.
When I use the word contemporary it is often the dialogue that has changed. It is not only much crisper, edgier, and wittier than Ludlum, it also uses dialogue from movies like, "Pulp Fiction", that would never have been found in the late author's work. What puzzles me is where the publishers find a writer this good who is willing to remain anonymous. Perhaps these contributions will launch a new career eventually, but in the meantime I hope that whoever is writing these books is being very well paid. One only has to look to the last, "Ludlum", book and its time spent on the bestseller lists to hope this is true.
The author has created one of the most entertaining players in the form of Grigori Berman. This Russian now considers himself absolutely the English gentleman, and to prove it one need only visit his home which was decorated with a single purchase. For on the day Merchant and Ivory Films completed one of their period pieces, our Russian simply bought the sets in their entirety and furnished his home in fashionable London. The paintings are not quite finished, and the furniture looks a bit strange without studio lighting, but for Grigori they are perfection. Grigori's butler is also a riot as he trains his "English" boss, and the nurses that attend to Grigori's needs have to be read about to be believed.
Whoever did write this tale they are very well schooled in the art of the extraordinary marksmen known as snipers. There are several very well written sequences that are very tense and also very informative as the three dimensional world of a sniper and teams of snipers is explained as the action takes place. The writing does not glorify what they do; these characters are not mindless killers or assassins for hire. They are people with amazing discipline and talent, and also people you want to stay a good mile or more away from.
I do think it matters who wrote this book, and I wish they were given the appropriate credit. The talent that is writing these books is extending the literary life and legacy of Mr. Ludlum, and he or she deserves to be recognized.
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3.0 out of 5 stars slow moving, July 9 2007
By 
Toni Osborne "The Way I See It" (Montreal, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Janson Directive (Hardcover)
This story had trouble keeping my attention; it was overall a slow moving read a bit too much verbiage to keep me in full interest. But it was a fun book, a typical Ludlum novel.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Way too long, June 23 2004
By 
FB_Daytona (Daytona Beach, FL) - See all my reviews
If I give 5 stars to the Bourne series, I would have to give this book 2 stars.
- Length: Way too long
- Detailes: too many irrelevant ones. I had to skip many paragraphs.
- Action packed: Not really. Atleast not compared to Bourne series.
- Ending: Huh?!
- Is it worth reading: not really
- So whats next: I think I will close the book on Ludlum after reading the new Bourne book. It seems that all of his works, carry the same story line. It gets boring after a while. So why am I either going to bother with the new Bourne book, even though it is not written by Ludlum? To just say that I have read all of Bourne books and plus the first 3 were awesome.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly Rousing Thriller, Feb. 1 2004
By 
Matthew DeReno (Pittsburgh, PA USA) - See all my reviews
Ludlum is at the top of, eh, his death I suppose! This is my first Ludlum novel and whether ghost written or co-authored, whatever, I found it a good read in the thriller genre. Intelligent, knowledgeable and well crafted are few among many choice words to describe this tale. Paul Janson, a seasoned ex-operative tormented by his own capabilities, is brought full circle back to the source of his nightmares - a man Janson thought he saw killed, a man that has since grown exponentially more dangerous and sinister. Then again, should it be surprising to Janson? There are many people that apparently this expert agent witnessed executed only to be surprised when they spring back into action at a later date (whether they were killed or it was their double). Jessica Kincaid, the remarkable assassin, that takes on an affinity for Paul Janson, her assigned "unsalvageable" target, plays a critical rule in helping him unravel the enigma of the death of Peter Novak, a man on a such a worldly scale that perhaps only a Citizen Kane could hope to surpass. Wonderfully written scenes include the park in England, the attempt to rescue Novak from the Caliph, the streets of Greece, well, you get the picture. This story takes you around a world the author has been many times before. As my first Ludlum book, an interest kindled by my enjoyment of the Bourne Identity motion picture, I am excited about the prospects of late nights with Ludlum's classic stories.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Janson Directive, Nov. 19 2003
By 
Nathan (Westminster, CO USA) - See all my reviews
"Ludlum's best since his masterpiece The Bourne Identity"- Kirkus Reviews. The Janson Directive is a covert one novel. The hero in this novel, Paul Janson is the most unlikely hero, a super assassin. He is a successful entrepreneur and former agent of the United States Covert Ops.
A representative from the Liberty Foundation contacts Janson and asks him to rescue the founder of the Liberty Foundation. The founder of the Liberty Foundation is Peter Novak a billionaire and a Nobel Peace Prize winner. Novak is kidnapped by the same terrorist group responsible for Janson's wife's death. Janson agrees to rescue Peter Novak who was personally responsible for saving Janson's life many years ago. Janson finds out that Novak's execution is scheduled to be in a three days. So with only days to work he assembles an elite team of covert operatives from around the world to rescue Novak. Against incredible and overwhelming odds they rescue Novak from an almost impenetrable fortress. On the verge of success a terrible tragedy occurs killing Janson's protégé and Novak. Janson then goes on a quest to find out who killed his friends and ruined his mission. He goes from city to city only to find people who try to kill him in every city. First Janson believes it must be operatives of the terrorist group seeking revenge for his part in the daring rescue of Novak. Janson soon learns from a would-be assassin that a "beyond salvage" is issued by Janson's former agency and he is targeted for death. His expert instincts kick in, making him an unstoppable opponent for his former agency. Janson uses every resource he has while running from assassins to unfoil the plot to kill him. The rest of the book has many twists and turns and is unpredictable. It is a page-turner, which you can't put down. The plot is amazing and keeps you hooked the whole time and the use of figurative words is amazing and gives you a clear picture of what is happing. I recommend this book to everyone who likes thrillers.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as polished as other Ludlum novels, Nov. 15 2003
This review is from: The Janson Directive (Hardcover)
As a posthumous release, I was thrilled to have yet another Ludlum novel to curl up with and enjoy. But, although the plot and its development were quite good, I found some of the style elements of this book rather annoying. For example, the numerous paragraphs filled with questions to lead the reader on (What will he do?, Where to go now?). This shows a certain limitation in the writing style I don't remember seeing much in previous novels. Perhaps these were part of the 10% not written by the author himself...
Also disrupting were the excessive missing words, word order inversions and typos found in the edition I read (the hardcover first edition by St. Martin's Press). This made it look like a rush order to bring this book to the public, but it also shows a certain lack of concern for quality. I would recommend waiting for a second edition to be published if you are also bothered by such details.
However, the plot is interesting and I found myself immersed in Ludlum's world of espionage and intrigue once again. Although a small part of the story line is quite predictable, the author manages to through in enough spins to keep the reader guessing and turning the pages.
Enjoy!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Decent Ludlum, Nov. 2 2003
Robert Ludlum's latest thriller is par for the course - an amusing diversion that entertains while you read but is pretty forgettable after you're done. Even now, a mere week after reading it, I find it hard to recall exactly what it was about.
Ah yes, now I remember: An ex-spy named Janson is recruited to save the life of a philanthropic billionaire who is being held by a terrorist. The rescue almost goes okay, but then goes really wrong and Janson is suddenly a fugitive. Janson - like all Ludlum heroes, haunted by the death of a relative, in this case his wife - is caught between the government and the bad guys, and often has trouble figuring out which is which.
At first, this one seems like an atypical Ludlum novel. The terrorist who Janson is up against seems strictly minor league and the global conspiracy that is standard Ludlum is nowhere to be seen. Eventually, such a conspiracy does appear, but while it is a clever enough idea, the main villain - in certain ways obvious from the get-go - has achieved his power in a completely ludicrous way. The sheer dumbness of the villain's rise to power - even though recognized as such by Janson - hurts the plausiblity and quality of the book.
But if this is not a great book, it is still the type of entertainment that Ludlum typically delivers. For those familiar with Ludlum, there will be little disappointment here, and even for those unfamiliar with him, this will not be a bad read. While I cannot wholeheartedly recommend this book, I wouldn't actively steer anyone away from it either.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Same old, same old... You wish!, Oct. 21 2003
By 
There is nothing to say against Ludlum's storylines. The same pattern, however he always manages to turn it into something exciting and unpredictable. Not so this time. Taking off to a great start, he is painting the picture of a great Hungarian philantropist, who resembles the real life, well known financial tycoon G. S.
From there on however, any seasoned thriller reader can easily predict the turn of events. Even more, the writing is sloppy, commercial, and unmotivated. Where Ludlum used to paint a picture for all of his characters, making them unpredictable, he does only the minimum necessary to fulfil his page quota. His hero's picture is more ellaborate, but one would imagine, that R.L. can come up with some new character profiles.
Why do I give two stars? Well, I have seen worse than this: The Covert-One series.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another example of Ludlum's brand of exciting read, Oct. 20 2003
Amazon.com provided a detailed synopsis of Ludlum's latest posthumous offering, so I'm going to forego providing my own.
Besides I don't want to give away a sentence of plot, as hopefully many people will read this excellent thriller based on the author's hard-earned reputation as master of the spy thriller. Some speculation admittedly if this was a novel written by Mr. Ludlum or by someone else, I claim it matters not, this is by far his best novel since The Bourne Identity. The book is long but every page is packed with suspense, thrills, chills, and even romance. The plotting is as familiarly paced ( i.e. fast paced) as one has come to expect of a thriller bearing Mr. Ludlum's name. Some may be disappointed which is there perogative, personally, I felt his characterization and general technical background was deeper than in some of his recently published novels and as a whole The Janson Directive is an action packed page turner (cliche but true.)
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great book, Oct. 16 2003
By A Customer
A classic Ludlum novel. Suspenseful and electrifying.
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The Janson Directive
The Janson Directive by Robert Ludlum (Mass Market Paperback - July 1 2008)
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