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on August 8, 2009
Although the author offers an interesting approach toward making decisions, his continuing use of the same stories over and over again to illustrate his points drove me bonkers. Gladwell could (and should) have written the entire message in half the pages. He still would not have convinced me that his premise was correct, but at least I wouldn't have been bored. After reading The Tipping Point and Outliers, this book was a disappointment in both content and writing style.
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on July 20, 2009
Perhaps I was expecting too much after the rave reviews but I was left hoping to have had a better conclusion or wrap-up to all the interesting information that Gladwell presented.

That said, I would recommend it as an intereting read which provides you with why you should listen to your instinct. Gladwell does well to provide anecdotal evidence of how you may be better off making a decision based on your initial instinctive reaction rather than having volumes of data on which to base your decision.

It has to do with our learned experiences over the course of our lives. The information is stored in our brain and when the need arises, we subconsciously draw on that information to help us immediately assess our situation and thereby decide a course of action- within milliseconds. In fact, such millisecond decisions or assessments prove to be more accurate than basing decisions on detailed scientific data. It has to do with our brain's ability to pick up on minute differences in facial expressions or physical features - the curl of a lip, the angle of a frown line, a person's stance or even a professional's ability to sense that a sculpture is a fake despite scientific evidence to the contrary.

Thus the title of the book "Blink"

In keeping with the title, I think Gladwell could have condensed the material he presented, particularly with the discussion about the various parts of the brain which store various types of information. A diagram would have helped.

Nonetheless, it's worth buying the book because it provides very interesting perspectives on the biases we have embedded in our minds and how these underlying biases influence the decisions we make in our daily lives.

I learned a lot from this book.
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on April 26, 2009
This was a facinating read. This book was a required read for one of my upcoming yoga teacher trainning courses... I must admit that I wondered why at first.....Now I know. It's a must read for everyone. It just makes you think and as the author says "without thinking". Decission making, problem solving...etc..etc..etc...simple and yet so powerful.
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on January 16, 2009
This book says that sometimes people make good decisions, sometimes bad upon first impression. It gives examples. Little attempt is made to show us how to make the good decisions instead of the bad ones. It says that sometimes deliberate choices, sometimes spontaneous choices are better. In other words, it's common sense. I found the subtitle to be misleading. I was expecting more of an explanation exactly just how to use that "power of thinking without thinking".
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on December 19, 2008
I thought that Blink is a very good book, because it makes a simple and interesting point about split-second decisions, and then it blends in appropriate examples and anecdotes well. Gladwell's writing is interesting, he never really strays from his original idea that was presented well in the first few pages, and the book is short enough to hold your attention until the end.

If you are someone like me who often gets bored reading non-fiction books that drag on in various directions, Blink will likely be a refreshing alternative.
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on November 25, 2008
I highly recommend this book. While the topic is quite scientific, the author
has been able to engage the reader easily with compelling, memorable stories. A great eye-opener!
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on March 12, 2008
With roughly 260 pages and seven chapters (including the conclusion), "Blink" is a well-written and insightful book on the subject of accurate "snap judgment" or two-second of "looking." This book gives us, the reader, a great deal of information about our "moment" to see things accurately, either in quick reaction, warnings, reading strangers, as it is very much like "gut" feelings or first impressions.

I personally found this book to be quite fascinating and insightful to which I enjoyed both Gladwell's flowing writing style and his clear organization. It took me a good few hours to read it as I could not put the book down. To understand our "snap" judgment is to reach an understanding of how basic a human being really is. Today's world, with all the media and overwhelming information, we tend to lose this kind of sense in ourselves.

I would very much recommend this book.
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on March 3, 2008
Another great book by Gladwell. The best part is that he explains why gut feelings may not be correct. Many people go to the bank with gut feelings and lose. Gladwell explains why. On the other hand some people do well with gut feelings. (All is basically the quality of the information that you store in your subconscious.) An 'aha!' type of book.
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on December 10, 2007
Wow! Finally I get to read a book that shows the other side of this coin. M. Gladwell makes a superb work at giving a different idea of how we make judgements and therefore, how we can manage under certain circumstances those belly messages (according to his book, perhaps, only perhaps, we should give more credit to them than we do...). Each reader can make his / her own interpretation of the cases presented and then, understand and apply to every particular experience. Every case presented in this book is (to say the least) fascinating... one of those books you can't stop reading once you opened it!
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on November 7, 2007
No wonder this is a best seller. The author explains in an easy to follow way, the power of snap decisions and how they work. It shows how powerful and accurate instantaneous decisions can be, that we often are at odds to explain how we arrived at. Gladwell explains how these decisions are arrived at by the meticulous gathering of information by our unconscious.

However they are not always accurate and this is largely due to bias, such as stereotyping and prejudices. No doubt hormones play a role in that bias too, such as when people 'fall' in love and go on to marry that person. Gladwell here sites a number of studies by psychologist John Gottman, who discovered after studying thousands of interviews with married couples that he was able to tell with 95% accuracy whether a couple would remain together after 15 years from just observing an interview with a couple for 15 minutes.

An interesting book that makes one think about the powerful working of the unconscious and how to use it in beneficial ways.
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