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56 of 58 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great read... until the ending doesn't materialize
Extremely interesting book with insightful theories on why and how we make decisions. Unfortunately, you don't find out until the disappointing end that the "chapters" were independent essays. As with most books, I looked forward to finding out how the author will wrap everything up and tie the stories together in the end. Apparently, Gladwell either didn't feel...
Published on June 23 2005

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65 of 70 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Informed Intuition Beats Analysis and Knee-Jerk Prejudices
Like The Tipping Point, Blink has a very simple point which it elaborates from a variety of perspectives. In this case, the point is that our subconscious mind can integrate small, subtle clues to very quickly make great decisions . . . as long as we have been trained to know what clues to focus on.

In developing that simple idea, Mr. Gladwell makes the case...
Published on July 15 2006 by Donald Mitchell


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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great study on how our minds work, Nov. 4 2007
By 
Lynne Grey (United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
This well-written book shows several studies that have been conducted on how we can, in a 'blink', make an accurate assessment of any situation. The catch, however, is that one must be knowledgeable about the situation at hand.

It also shows how we can be programmed into biases by those who know how to do such things.

This book is very insightful on just how our brains are wired to work. A very interesting subject.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I "Thin-Sliced" the Title, March 31 2007
By 
Michael A. Rousell "Sudden Influence: How Spo... (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
Blink is a fun read and fascinating too. "Thin-slicing:" whereby we make a snap judgment, usually accurate in nature, works in the physical world to a magnificent degree. How we know something instantly, without knowing why we know it is often the signpost of our "thin-slicing" proclivity. I enjoyed the read but hoped to see more about how we self-validate our first impressions, giving ourselves the self-fulfilling assurance that we were indeed correct with our limited information. I would also like to see more about how our ability to access social situations evolves from our early encounters. These may be in future books and I look forward to more of Gladwell's fine writing and informative outlooks.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Very Interesting Book, Aug. 19 2006
By 
Jeff Summers "The Business Reader" (North Vancouver, BC Canada) - See all my reviews
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This was an awesome book to read - really makes you think. It was interesting to read about how fast we make judgements, but more interestly, why we make many of the judgements we do. If you like books that are about the "whys" of the world, then this is a great book!!
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Think about thinking about the power of thinking without thinking, Sept. 28 2007
By 
EmmEff (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
I do not believe this book offers, nor was intended to offer, a compelling reason to stop critical analysis, however it does raise the point that "thin slicing" and instant reactions can be remarkably accurate given.

If nothing else, "Blink" makes the reader draw parallels to personal events, split-second decisions, reactions, and the outcomes that followed.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Split second thinking, Aug. 2 2005
This book is great. There is so much that happens in the brain in a split second and it's fascinating to consider how emotions influence our judgments so quickly. Gladwell presents an interesting journalists perspective on this phenomena. My favorite part was the discussion of "mind blindness."
Another book I recommend is "The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book." It offers a great perspective on emotions and how they influence our actions and comes with an online EQ test.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun and Engaging, and Genuinely Eye opening. Typical Gladwell., Nov. 7 2011
By 
This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
Years ago, Legendary NBA Coach (recently retired) Phil Jackson started handing out books to his players, to rectify any flaws or hone any mental aspects of the game in the offseason. If a player had a problem with his jumpshot or defense, that could be rectified in practice, but if a player had an overarching attitude problem, or consistency problem, maybe that would have to be rectified with reading, and contemplation. And so, as far back as the Chicago Bulls era, Phil was handing out what he thought were great books, each one suited for each unique player's game, personality and weaknesses.

A few years ago, I remember hearing he gave 'Blink' to Kobe Bryant. Kobe, more than anything, has been known for these insane last second buzzer beater shots. He's taken tons of them. And if you factor in all the shots he missed, frankly, his hit/miss ratio isn't even that good. As the leader and captain on the team, he keeps finding himself with the ball in his hands at the end of games, and usually, he can get a shot off. Phil knew that Kobe was under incredible pressure late in games, in moments where every millisecond counts, and that's why he gave Kobe this book. If Kobe could just stop thinking altogether, he'd know exactly what to do. What could you improve if you could switch off your mind in the clutch?

This review is going to sound like a Coda to the Steve Jobs book from last week. It just turned out that way. Steve, time and time again, relied on his intuition, laying waste to months and months of work, design, coding, budgets etc. What is our Intuition, really, and why is it so damn smart (at some things), if our senses and hunches seem, at first, so vague?

First, let's go back to early stages of Man's evolution. We know that at some point, we were moving around, we were mobile, and we probably travelled in packs and tribes. How did early Man communicate? I can only speculate that there were a lot of visual signals (pointing, imitating large animals, etc), sniffing, tasting, yelling, whimpering, and so on. In other words, even if you toss the spoken word completely, you're still left with 5 senses, and those can still be employed to communicate (as a modern analogue, pro sports works, as does Improv Theatre, as Gladwell highlights in the book). Just look at a baby: the baby doesn't know what's going on, but instinctually does certain things to get what she wants. She's communicating at primitive levels. And we humans, in the modern era, do a weird thing: We teach ourselves to talk, to read, to study. We even learn thousands of very specific words to describe the world around us. Many of us even learn multiple languages. But if you really think about it, from Shakespeare to Stephen King, writing, at its best, is attempting to describe indescribable things. Writing and speaking, are, by their very nature, bastardizations, muddled, rough, approximations of pure thought and feeling. Verbal and written communication is inherently unclear and abstracted. So where am I going with this? Body language and instinctive forms of communication are pure, and it's that 'language' we have to relearn, if we want to read systems and situations holistically. There is holistic communication going on, whether we like or not, it's just a matter of understanding the signals.

Kobe Bryant dribbling up the floor with 11 seconds on the clock, down by three, isn't thinking (we hope) logically, but watching the floor for the tiniest of gaps, perhaps even noticing which of the opposing players is breathing heavily, or limping slightly. Where is the weak point?

Why do some electronics companies spend so much time trying to design beautiful packaging, that seems to cradle the device like a precious jewel? Ultimately the packaging is going to be thrown out, right? The answer is that more companies are realizing that the whole experience of using a product contributes to the 'Customer Satisfaction Rating' and if you push up that rating high enough, you get a sense of what kind of high price you can charge. That's perceived value. Visual, auditory, olifactory (eg. New Car Smell); it's obvious that all senses contribute, but perhaps those senses about a product, about a person, about a situation, are the most important of all.

Over and over again, we chastize ourselves for 'judging' people who dress like hoodlums, or look a little rough around the edges, but ultimately, aren't we just battling our own inner intuition? When we sit down to lunch with our high school friends, and one of them is wearing a beautiful gold watch, we subconsciously attribute positive traits to him, suddenly our minds start turning: 'How did he afford that?', 'What did he say he did for a living? Something financial?' We intuitively know everything we need to know about this person in just a few seconds, as long as we ignore everything we think we know, and listen to what our senses are telling us. Yes it's tricky. It's tricky because people often lie to us to improve their outward image/appearance. Toss out the company line, read the body, and the truth is right there, staring you in the face.

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Deal, Oct. 8 2009
By 
M. Shahi "Mohsen Books" (Canada) - See all my reviews
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The book as claimed was new. The price was amazing. The only thing was that the white cover was a bit dirty. Also some pages are printed not exactly vertical: no big deal for reading though.

Great book.
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4 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blink, May 29 2005
By A Customer
Interesting book. How can you make decisions without having to think about it? We all have those moments in our lives and this book helps to explain and to even guide us with this process. I got this book along with Stop Working by Rohan Hall. Both books are excellent for better decision making.
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Real Books For Bigger Thinkers, March 26 2006
By 
You've Got to trust your gut more advises Gladwell, particularly when a little voice inside you seems to be urging you to do what you can't explain. I love the advice and the message of the book. Its got wisdom that you want to trust in and believe. Its a gem just in the way it makes you think about decisions.
I can also recommend one of my favorite books for new business learning in 2006. THE BLACK BOOK OF OUTSOURCING (Brown & Wilson, Wiley Publishers 2006) is a comprehensive guide and directory for the emerging field of outsourcing, including expert advice on how to operate an outsourcing program, how to deal with the political aspects of outsourcing, and how to find a career in outsourcing. In this one-of-a-kind resource, the authors chart a course for business leaders charged with managing outsourcing initiatives and present a wealth of employment opportunities for workers who want to enter this growing field.
Real books for big thinkers.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Reads on the State of Business, March 16 2006
Great reading for the advancement minded executive and aspiring manager, Blink makes your brain's creative side get a jump start. Its a great gift choice for business friends also.
Another book which I just bought and recommend is THE BLACK BOOK OF OUTSOURCING (by Brown & Wilson), a top read and primer on outsourcing know-how - - - a super reference and resource guide for managers at all levels.
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Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell (Paperback - Dec 4 2006)
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