Customer Reviews


34 Reviews
5 star:
 (11)
4 star:
 (16)
3 star:
 (7)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Another Fforde Masterpiece!
(Warning: Reading this book without having read the first two is extremely hazardous to mental health!)
Thursday Next is back! Hoorah! Being in grave danger from the Hades girl and having been unsuccessful in the recovery of her eradicated husband, she has left the real world (a/k/a the Outland) to spend her gestation period in the Book World. Thanks to her position...
Published on May 22 2004 by Gypsi Phillips Bates

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not like Book 1 & 2
Good book in general but not with as much action. It plays a lot on cool ways to explore books rather than being a full blown story
Published on Nov. 28 2008 by Genevieve Alarie


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious Send-Up of Literature and Writing, July 18 2004
By 
Debbie Lee Wesselmann (the Lehigh Valley, PA) - See all my reviews
From the first chapter of Jasper Fforde's third novel, you can tell that the author had a blast writing this satiric mystery that explores the creation of fiction. Thursday Next - pregnant by her eradicated husband, haunted by a Hades sister intent on destroying her memory, and a Jurisfiction apprentice to none other than Miss Havisham of Dickens fame - takes refuge in a poorly written and unpublished crime novel called Caversham Heights. Thursday expects to rest there until the birth of her child, but she and Miss Havisham discover that the death of another agent by a Minotaur attack might not be the accident it seems. Meanwhile, nursery rhyme characters threaten a strike for not being treated like other fictional characters, two generic characters living with Thursday begin to become more well-rounded, and Thursday tries to save Caversham Heights from being destroyed by the Council of Genres for being so hopelessly bad.
The more you know about literature, the more hilarious you'll find this fantasy. Characters are being manufactured in record numbers because Vikram Seth is planning a new novel, and no one wants a return to minimalism simply because of a character shortage. Heathcliff, Catherine, and the rest of the characters from Wuthering Heights attend anger management classes, and Mr. Toad is relentless in his competition with Miss Havisham for the fastest driver in both the Book World and the Outland. And if you're interesting in writing, you'll gain tips for keeping your novel out of the Text Sea, as Fforde pokes fun at hackneyed writing and incomplete character development.
Because this is my first Fforde novel, I started reading this without any knowledge of what has happened previously in the series, but the author provides enough of a synopsis in the beginning to give a new reader the proper bearings. Despite this, there remains a disjointedness at times as so much satire is pumped into the book that does little to advance the plot. Sometimes Thursday seems to be there purely as a straight man, raising the question that perhaps Fforde should have heeded some of his own lessons in fiction writing. Fortunately, these lapses are few and don't hinder the enjoyment of the novel as a whole. This relatively long novel is not demanding and can be read more quickly than the page count might indicate.
As a literary joke, The Well of Lost Plots is a triumph. As a mystery/fantasy, it is less successful. Readers will nonetheless delight in Fforde's imagination as he takes them through the land of the unpublished and the more solid, though more turbulent, ground of the classics.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious literary fun, June 13 2004
By 
This third installment of the Thursday Next series is just as magical, offbeat, and hilarious as the previous two. I was thoroughly impressed with the world that Jasper Fforde created with the first book, The Eyre Affair, and was glad to discover the same kind of imaginative detail in this novel. I can only think to compare the quirky world of The Well of Lost Plots with that of The Wizard of OZ (but for book lovers!). In this novel, Thursday Next is hiding out in the book world, the world of fiction. She joins the character exchange program, fills a role in a novel so bad that it's threatened to be broken up and recycled in the text sea, befriends some generics that have yet to be actualized into characters, battles a mindworm that is destroying her memories and struggles to solve a series of murders all at the same time.
As an English major graduate with a good knowledge of classic fiction under my belt, what I love most about the Thursday Next series is the amount of humor in the text. Fforde sprinkles witty tongue-in-cheek jokes about all kinds of literature and literary characters throughout the story. The cast of Wuthering Heights is enrolled in a rage counselling group, everyone ends up waiting for Agent Godot, and a multitude of other characters from well known novels have cameos in this book.
My only complaint about this novel is that I was eager to have the plot regarding Thursday's erradiacated husband Landen furthered more than it was. This novel mainly deals with Thursday's own inner battles against her mindworm and the murders in the Well of Lost Plots. --But perhaps I'm too eager. The next Next book is slated for release this August...so the rest will come in time.
I would highly recommend this novel to fans of the Thursday Next series. For those unfamiliar, read The Eyre Affair!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Far from "Lost", June 6 2004
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
In 2002, Jasper Fforde won over fans from all over the world with "The Eyre Affair." Now he's presented "Well of Lost Plots," the third playful satire/mystery/fantasy starring hardboiled detective Thursday Next. It lacks the oomph and tightness of the first two books, but the hilariously literate mystery is still enthralling.
Thursday Next is in self-exile. After her husband was erased as a blackmail ploy and the world was almost reduced to goo, she is lying low to wait for her baby's birth, and to figure out how to bring her husband back. Problem is, she is now living in an unpublished detective thriller in the Well of Lost Plots, a sort of fiction limbo. The fictional people are thrilled to meet an Outlander (a person from the real world), but Thursday must deal with some generic extra roommates, and a pregnancy by the husband who no longer technically exists.
Then her mentor dies horribly, and Thursday finds that her brain is being invaded by memory-erasing mindworm. She sets out to uncover a black market that is recycling characters, and to avoid the attacks of the evil Aornis. Soon the world of fiction is under attack yet again -- and it's Thursday Next to somehow stop everything from collapsing.
One of the greatest things about Fforde's books is how hysterically smart they are. Fforde peppers his book with the Lewis Carroll, Falstaff, the Questing Beast, Mr. Toad, the Minotaur, the early works of the Brontë sisters, Heathcliff, and much more. What's more, he gives them a wink-nudge twist worthy of the best of British comedy.
That isn't to say that it's perfect. Fforde seems to lose the flow from time to time, and the plot takes quite some time to figure out where it's going. But his dialogue is still wickedly funny (when talking about discarded fantasy novels: "Do you have unicorns?" "Yes, sackloads"), and his subtle satire is delicious. It almost makes you forget that the plot meanders.
Thursday is a little more weathered in her third mystery; she's a little more vulnerable than before, which has dulled her edge. She still totes a gun and can be the toughie when required, though. The hilariously tough Ms. Havisham and nurturing Gran serve as nice foils and backups. So do ibb and obb, a pair of generic background characters who have no personalities, backgrounds... or senses of humor.
Fforde's unique fantasy-mysteries are like reading an Escher print, with a bit of Monty Python sprinkled in the margins. "Well of Lost Plots" isn't as good as the two before it, but it's still wickedly intellectual goofiness. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Another Fforde Masterpiece!, May 22 2004
By 
(Warning: Reading this book without having read the first two is extremely hazardous to mental health!)
Thursday Next is back! Hoorah! Being in grave danger from the Hades girl and having been unsuccessful in the recovery of her eradicated husband, she has left the real world (a/k/a the Outland) to spend her gestation period in the Book World. Thanks to her position as Jurisfiction apprentice, she takes advantage of the "character exchange program" to hide out in Caversham Heights (a not-very-good, detective novel that is still under construction in the Well). Thursday mistakenly assumes that this will give her a peaceful year in which to be pregnant, have the child of a man that never existed, and decide just how to get that man's existence back.
Jurisfiction (the policing agency of the fiction world) turns out to be much more exciting than anticipated, what with the Pro Catherine faction trying to kill Heathcliff, the Minotaur disappearing and something odd and dangerous going on with the new UltraWord testings--not to mention the everyday adventures of training under Miss Havisham!
On top of that, she's billeting two Generics in her home, attempting to defeat a memory thief, studying for her Jurisfiction exam, having morning sickness, presenting the Bookie for "Best Chapter Opening in the English Language" and giving advice to a lady gorilla.
Sure, the storyline's a bit unbelievable, there's a lot to keep up with, and I didn't always get the jokes, but all in all The Well of Lost Plots is another gem! Fforde keeps the funnies coming so fast, it's hard to breathe in between them. His Douglas Adams-esq humor, literary jokes and just darn good writing skills make this an A-1 book! But remember, you MUST read The Eyre Affair and Lost in a Good Book before attempting this one. If you ignore this warning, it'll be like reading Macbeth for Yeast* and not at all the pleasant experience it was for me.
*"///..//..///// ......///// .../ ./ .......// ..// ..// ./// ...///////"
excerpt from Macbeth for Yeast, translated by ..//// ..///..
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Did I say rest ??? :), June 22 2004
By 
M. B. Alcat "Curiosity killed the cat, but sa... (Hanoi, Vietnam) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
As you already know, "The Well of Lost Plots" is the 3rd book in the "Thursday Next" series. After reading the first two awesome books in the series, you might think that there is no way the author can surprise you again... However, if you were to think that you would be very wrong, because Jasper Fforde does it again :)
At the end of "Lost in a good book" we left Thursday pregnant, with a husband eradicated at the age of two, and followed by the Goliath Corporation (who wanted her skills to jump into books). She was in urgent need of a hiding place, at least until her son was born and she could begin again her efforts to un-eradicate her husband. As a consequence, she decided to "get lost in a good book", more specifically in a B novel in the Well of Lost Plots, in order to get some deserved rest.
Did I say rest?. Well, at least that is what she expected to get, but with her temporary job at Jurisfiction, an assassin killing Jurisfiction agents and grammasites all over the place, getting some rest won't be easy. On top of all that, Thursday must face the very real risk that "Caversham Heights" (the B novel where she is staying for a year thanks to the Character Exchange Program) will be scraped, and deal with an enemy that she thought was left behind in the "real" world: Aornis Hades.
As you can see, the "Well of Lost Plots" is likely to be everything but boring... You will meet again some old friends (for example Miss Havisham), and get to know new ones. But beware: there is a traitor among the people Thursday knows and likes. And where is Godot?. Why doesn't he appear?.
I want to point out that I loved the introduction of the generic characters who lived with Thursday, "ibb" and "obb", who later won the right to use capital letters, thus becoming "Ibb" and "Obb", and who went to school in order to become characters in different books. They are... different, but charming :)
Fforde goes on introducing unexpected things, for example a footnote system that works not only as a radio, but also as cellular phones that allow everybody to listen to private conversations. I liked the misspelling "vyrus", and the idea that in order to contain it many dictionaries were needed, but I hated what happened to one of the characters because of an incident involving that "vyrus".
I probably could go on and on writing about "The Well of Lost Plots", because I loved it, and there are really lots of things to be said about it. However, I think that it is better to allow you to discover the rest, because if I don't let you do that I would be depriving you of a wonderful pleasure...
I recommend this book to all those who love literature and will appreciate casual and pertinent allusions to well-known books and characters, but also to those who just enjoy an innovative and appealing fantasy book. If you would like to "jump into a book", seize the opportunity and do exactly that, with Thursday Next !!!.
Belen Alcat
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not like Book 1 & 2, Nov. 28 2008
By 
Genevieve Alarie "Lost in a good book" (Montreal, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Well Of Lost Plots (Mass Market Paperback)
Good book in general but not with as much action. It plays a lot on cool ways to explore books rather than being a full blown story
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Well well, Feb. 24 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: Well Of Lost Plots (Mass Market Paperback)
Jasper Fforde won over fans from all over the world with "The Eyre Affair." Now he's presented "Well of Lost Plots," the third playful satire/mystery/fantasy starring hardboiled detective Thursday Next. It lacks the oomph and tightness of the first two books, but the hilariously literate mystery is still enthralling.

Thursday Next is in self-exile. After her husband was erased as a blackmail ploy and the world was almost reduced to goo, she is lying low to wait for her baby's birth, and to figure out how to bring her husband back. Problem is, she is now living in an unpublished detective thriller in the Well of Lost Plots, a sort of fiction limbo. The fictional people are thrilled to meet an Outlander (a person from the real world), but Thursday must deal with some generic extra roommates, and a pregnancy by the husband who no longer technically exists.

Then her mentor dies horribly, and Thursday finds that her brain is being invaded by memory-erasing mindworm. She sets out to uncover a black market that is recycling characters, and to avoid the attacks of the evil Aornis. Soon the world of fiction is under attack yet again -- and it's Thursday Next to somehow stop everything from collapsing.

One of the greatest things about Fforde's books is how hysterically smart they are. Fforde peppers his book with the Lewis Carroll, Falstaff, the Questing Beast, Mr. Toad, the Minotaur, the early works of the Bront' sisters, Heathcliff, and much more. What's more, he gives them a wink-nudge twist worthy of the best of British comedy.

That isn't to say that it's perfect. Fforde seems to lose the flow from time to time, and the plot takes quite some time to figure out where it's going. But his dialogue is still wickedly funny (when talking about discarded fantasy novels: "Do you have unicorns?" "Yes, sackloads"), and his subtle satire is delicious. It almost makes you forget that the plot meanders.

Thursday is a little more weathered in her third mystery; she's a little more vulnerable than before, which has dulled her edge. She still totes a gun and can be the toughie when required, though. The hilariously tough Ms. Havisham and nurturing Gran serve as nice foils and backups. So do ibb and obb, a pair of generic background characters who have no personalities, backgrounds... or senses of humor.

Fforde's unique fantasy-mysteries are like reading an Escher print, with a bit of Monty Python sprinkled in the margins. "Well of Lost Plots" isn't as good as the two before it, but it's still wickedly intellectual goofiness. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the first two, May 25 2004
By A Customer
Although this book was clever, it was not as engaging as the first two. I actually got bored -- something I could not have imagined reading the first two which I could not put down.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Phantasik Fanthaci Phfunnnn!, May 9 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
I read relatively little fantasy because authors usually make it too much work . . . and not enough fun. Jasper Fforde has exceeded my expectations for fun, and kept me chuckling for hours. Although I have not read the earlier two books in the series (a mistake I'll be sure to remedy quickly), I had no trouble picking up the story line and following the continuity. If this book were to be graded solely on the fantasy world that was created, this book would be about a seven star effort. The subplots could have been trimmed (especially Lola, Randolph, Captain Nemo and the nursery rhyme characters), and this would have been an outstanding book.
Alice in Wonderland is one of my favorite fantasy books, and The Well of Lost Plots clearly borrows from that inventive work while adding unique elements relating to how fiction is written, read and understood. Fans of Alice will enjoy meeting the Cheshire Cat, the White Rabbit, the King and Queen of Hearts and the Gryphon. The book also borrows heavily from the Wizard of Oz in its story of conflict between good and evil in a magical land where characters live according to the limits of their development.
As a writer, though, the book had me spellbound in its concoctions to pick up on all of the tasks that writers go through to create books. I often felt like I was traveling through my own mind rather than reading a book.
The book had me chuckling at the same time as a reader. There are constant references to important characters in fiction (such as Miss Havisham and Heathcliff) and plot devices used in those works.
What's the story then? Well, Thursday Next has left the real world for the Well of Lost Plots (the 26 floors of subbasement beneath the Great Library where all English fiction books are shelved)) where all stories are developed and protected. She's pregnant by her husband who was eradicated at age two in an earlier book. She's looking for temporary refuge from the threat to her life. While there, she finds she's been infected with a memory virus that is sapping her recollections of her husband. Miss Havisham is to be her guide, and helps her find a role filling in temporarily for another character in an unpublished book, Caversham Heights. Miss Havisham directs her towards becoming a Prose Resource Operative for Jurisfiction, those who help maintain the integrity of fiction. In that role, she's soon confronted with mayhem, death and a sinister plot that threatens fiction to the core. By book's end, she's made some progress in counteracting those influences, but clearly there's a fourth book to come in the series.
I sincerely hope that English teachers will seriously consider assigning this book to help their students appreciate the true potential of fiction to stir the imagination, inform, influence and intrigue.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Lost plot?, May 5 2004
By A Customer
Jasper Fforde is as clever as ever in further developing Thursday's world, but for much of this book things feel seriously off track. The plot meanders and there were several times that I came dangerously close to putting this book down and not picking it up again. Instead of being sucked into Thursday's story I was content to pay the occasional visit and enjoy Fforde's latest clever concoction, but I never felt the compelling need to pick the book up and see what happened next. I wound up returning this book late to the library _ evidence enough that WOLP lacked the can't-put-it-down quality of the previous two outings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Well Of Lost Plots
Well Of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde (Mass Market Paperback - Jan. 19 2004)
Used & New from: CDN$ 0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews