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5.0 out of 5 stars vampires: reflecting human nature
This was the first vampire book I've ever read, and it wasn't really what I expected at all. It was better. The story, presented as an interview (naturally) traces the life and after-life of the vampire Louis from suicidal young man to cold, calm, veteran killer. Rice dispels many cliches with the *shocking* revelation that vampires are not repeled by crucifixes or...
Published on May 27 2004 by wendybird

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3.0 out of 5 stars Curse of the Vampires
I love vampires. Always have, onscreen and on the published page - from Bela Lugosi's Dracula (seen countless times on the old Saturday afternoon Shock Theater) to Stephanie Rothman's hip 1970 VELVET VAMPIRE.
So it was with great enthusiasm that I approached Anne Rice's work several years ago, and it was with slight disappointment that I exited it each time. I...
Published on May 26 2004 by Randall Ivey


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4.0 out of 5 stars Great work!, June 10 2004
This was a great novel. I wish I would have read this first, before I saw the film, that didn't even come close to doing the novel justice. Although I think Brad Pitt does make a great Louis. Interview is told from the perspective of Louis, a lone vampire who tells the story of his life to Daniel, a reporter (though you don't know the name of the 'boy' until the next book). He speaks of his relationship with Lestat, his maker, and Claudia, their 'daughter.' The tale is a great one, and much more complicated than shown in the film. Also, the ending of this book is very good, again, different from the film. The book held my interest from start to finish, which I hoped it would. I'm not a fast reader and I finished the first three Vampire Chronicles novels in 4 months. They're that good. This one is an excellent start. The only bad thing about this book is that sometimes it can get confusing because it's told in third person, but Louis is telling the story to someone else in first person. Other than that it is wonderful!
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5.0 out of 5 stars vampires: reflecting human nature, May 27 2004
This was the first vampire book I've ever read, and it wasn't really what I expected at all. It was better. The story, presented as an interview (naturally) traces the life and after-life of the vampire Louis from suicidal young man to cold, calm, veteran killer. Rice dispels many cliches with the *shocking* revelation that vampires are not repeled by crucifixes or garlic, and can see their reflections in mirrors. Louis himself is a most sensitive vampire who learns to both appreciate and fear the heightened senses of his kind. He also has a difficult time adjusting to killing, and hates his own innate cruelty as much as he craves blood. Louis has many thoughtful reflections on the concepts of death and evil that even mortals may find revealing (and which never sacrifice the pace of the unraveling drama). His introspective personality clashes with his irrepressible and often reckless master/creator, the vampire Lestat. Lestat uses the addition of the child vampire Claudia to their "family" as a means of keeping Louis subordinate. Through her immortal vampires, Rice actually addresses the theme of human nature: sensual, paradoxical, and often cruel.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Curse of the Vampires, May 26 2004
I love vampires. Always have, onscreen and on the published page - from Bela Lugosi's Dracula (seen countless times on the old Saturday afternoon Shock Theater) to Stephanie Rothman's hip 1970 VELVET VAMPIRE.
So it was with great enthusiasm that I approached Anne Rice's work several years ago, and it was with slight disappointment that I exited it each time. I don't know why she doesn't appeal to me the way she does to so many others. "Read the first one, read the first one!" my friends all admonished. "It's the best." So I did. I have just finished INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE, and I'm no more an Anne Rice enthusiast than when I started. Maybe it's the book's lush overwriting, its constant purple prose, its almost endless striving to be elegant. Maybe it's the violence. Some of it does go "over the top", and I am usually not a prude about such things. I don't know. I'm just left as cold as one of the blood hunters Rice depicts.
Oh Rice has "skills", to coin a popular teenage phrase. She can create a memorable set piece that has the reader turning pages. And there are a number of memorable moments in this book. The initiation of Claudia. The "death" of Lestat. The fabulous Parisian Theater of Vampires. The concluding scene with the young reporter. Each is riveting, even enthralling. But in-between those scenes there is too much chatter, too much introspection, too much - huff and gruff.
I appreciate the book's classic status. And I'm going to continue reading Anne Rice, hoping the magic spell she has cast on millions of readers will soon ensare me.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Blood & Love, March 27 2004
By 
Lee Armstrong (Winterville, NC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The cassette-recorded version of Anne Rice's novel is read wonderfully by F. Murray Abraham. He won the Oscar for "Amadeus" and has appeared in many films. His voice has excellent resonance and is greatly expressive. He tells this tale compellingly. As Louis the Vampire tells his story to the young journalist, we are drawn into the psyche of his once human existence, his Catholic roots in Louisiana, and his difficulty in leaving his humanity behind. Rice universalizes the vampire horror yarn as an intense psychological profile, giving it a depth of reality. As we learn about Louis' relationship with Lestat, we are fascinated and repelled. As Claudia becomes part of their vampire family, Abraham does a great job of conveying the ice running in the child's veins compared to the sensitivity and caring in Louis. The tale really becomes riveting as it moves to Paris and the Theatre Vampire comes in contact with Louis & Claudia. Sucking blood never sounded like a particularly erotic activity to me; but as Abraham milks Rice's dialogue, it becomes intensely erotic. Claudia's demise and Louis' teaming with Armand makes the climax rush to a fever pitch. I enjoy listening to tape versions of books during driving times. Abraham's version of this Anne Rice tale is excellent. Enjoy!
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1.0 out of 5 stars Oh Come on people!, March 3 2004
By 
Eric (El Sobrante, CA USA) - See all my reviews
Interview With the Vampire is just outright HORRIBLE! This was my first shot at Anne Rice, and it was my last. A friend told me about Anne Rice, and I did finish Interview With The Vampire (which took me six months because I was so lost and disquisted with the story), it left a bad taste in my mouth just finishing it. The story goes around Louis; an aristocrat during the 19th century. He then runs into Lestat; a vampire who has live for a long time. So Lestat bite's him and turns him into a vampire because this was something he really wanted. So now as they spend time together, Louis then goes through the years as a vampire feeding and eventually converting a little girl named Claudia which they raise has their own. Eventually Louis and Lestat go their seperate as Louis tries to kill him for reasons I dont understand and I clearly dont give a s*it about. Now we are in present San Francisco, the interview is over, and the reporter leaves the building with the tapes in hand. Over.
So why did I give this novel 1 star? Because Anne Rice babbles on and on about emotions, and about living the vampire life. I dont care if they had a bad day or what, vampires are supposed to be scary and hideous blood suckers, not these former humans to be soft or anything. Trust me people, there are sooooo many great novels out there than this crap. Read Salems' Lot or The Stake by Richard Laymon.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read this first.......if you get a chance, Jan. 20 2004
By 
Susan E. Atkinson (NJ) - See all my reviews
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I read the series out of order, sitting through Blood Canticle first (eeew)because I didnt know this was still available. It is still the best. If you have seen the movie, know that the book was first, and the stories do change from page to screen. First off, the lives of Louis & Lestat are far more tragic than you could ever feel the depth of on screen. There is history, traditions, subtle nuances in here you just cant watch in a movie. The characters are strongly developed. They truely are the saddest group of vampires you will ever meet. These characters are the strongest, and if you dont fall in love with them in just a few pages, your'e ,ost likely made of stone ! Ms Rice has taken a creature formerly associated with sheer terror, and made it the very sourceof all human emotion, suffering, and pain. I notice that alot of people fall in love with books in what is referred to as the "prime" of thier lives. In reading this, one can see why. The simple allure of being "perfect" and "preserved" forever. To have a lifetime to change, grow, and perfect ones true image. Its a book you cant put down ! VIVE Lestat !
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5.0 out of 5 stars Masterpiece, Dec 30 2003
By 
Kelly Thompson "geek" (Church Point, Louisiana) - See all my reviews
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I first became Rice obsessed in the 10th grade when I first read this novel. I specifically remember finishing it one week before the movie was released. I read it a few more times throughout the years and had to read it again this past spring for a class I took on vampire mythology and was reminded of just why I love this novel.
This novel isn't really about vampires, but about humans. The philosophical aspects regarding life/death/heaven/hell/good/evil/G-d/mortality brought up with this novel are amazing and I still find it hard to believe that I can still recite a particular passage Armand tells Louis about "how many vampires do you think have the stamina for immortality?"
I would like to re-read all of the Vampire Chronicles to gauge my reactions to it now compared to when I first read them. Still, this is Rice's masterpiece. I'm very interested in the vampire subculture from an anthropological perspective, so if the story seems appealing, I'll probably give it a read. I wasn't too impressed with Stoker's Dracula (I can feel the stakes being sharpened already) and didn't feel the pull to continue on with the Anita Blake series I started as a book report for the same vampire mythology class. I'm not saying all of Rice's novels are excellent, but this one is, in my opinion, the best of her collection.
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2.0 out of 5 stars I didnt like it, Dec 16 2003
By 
Eric (El Sobrante, CA USA) - See all my reviews
'Interview With The Vampire' by Anne Rice, I found this novel as something I wish that I did not read, but I decided to read it, and personally she is a master of the vampire, but this novel was my only Anne Rice novel, and was my last. I found the story to be slow, there was a lot of human emotion in this book, but I am used to being scared by vampires (Salems Lot for example) and vampires are just supposed to kill, there are some scenes where they do feed, but vampires are not supposed to have emotion, they are supposed to be blood suckers who haunt at night, and terrorize the town like in Salem's Lot.
I guess that I just have a different seeing on vampires. Anyway, the story follows around Lewis, a rich man in the 17 or 18 century, I cant remember, then he meets this vampire, and he turns into one, and he lives his life. The story takes place in two places in two different times: San Francisco, present, and New Orleans 17 or 18 century.
Lewis lives his life like he was still human, but I found this book to be too full of nothing, there is nothing exciting in this book, it is just him talking, and talking, and talking. It gets real boring, REAL FAST! I dont know what people see in this novel, but then I am not a big fan of Anne Rice, and I never will be. I just think that I rather just stick to Stephen King's Salems Lot if I want a real good vampire novel.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Vampire Classic, Dec 3 2003
By 
Jade Kith (Rochester, New York) - See all my reviews
Though admitidly over twenty years old, 'Interview with the Vampire' is without a doubt one of the most well written (and famous) vampire novels ever to to be published.
Now considered an essential in terms of vampire drama reading, Rice's novel is the autobiographical story of Louis Pointe du Lac, and 18th century plantation owner who's sudden and tragic loss of his younger brother sends the young man spiraling into an almost suicidal depression. It is here that Lestat, the foppish, charistmatic and deliciously wicked hero of the Vampire Chronicles makes his appearance as a kind of undead savoir for the man. Making Louis a vampire, Louis immediately rejects his new life but attempts to make the best of it. The rest of the story follows Louis's exploits as he travels with Lestat around the world, becomes the inadvertant guardian and eventual paritial lover of Claudia, the youngest ever made vampire. It spirals to their dramatic escape from Lestat and Louis's eventual loss and short reunion with his maker, in one achingly poetic and strikingly human portrayl of vampires and their life.
Though a bit hard to swallow at times, Rices overwhelmingly descriptive first-person narrative is easily ignored as the story in the backdrop does an excellent job of distracting the read from the sometimes heavy prose. Though now criticed as heavy and annoyingly meloncholy, here we see Rice's now familar formula telling of one's life story as it was meant to be seen. A wondeful, in-depth preview into the private thoughts and reactions of a character telling of the events of their life. Every scene Rice tells is painted a vivid and beautiful picture as she gives new life to the often shadowy and frightening world of the night.
Some of the less patient readers may be turned off by her, at-times overly long descriptions and sluggish pace. But those readers who treasure details and vivid pictures will undoubtedly fall for this now classic vampire story. Even those readers who simply value a good plot and well created characters should enjoy this novel and find the trudge through heavy and poetic prose well worth the trip.
A must read for all Vampire fans.
Koyla Dae
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Beginning, Nov. 23 2003
By 
LDG_reader (Canton, MI United States) - See all my reviews
After being thrilled with Anne Rice's style when I read "The Witching Hour" several years ago, I vowed to eventually read all of her work. Finally I have set myself to the task, beginning at the beginning with "Interview," her first, now classic novel.
For me Anne Rice's vampire and witches chronicles are a splendid mix of poetry, exotic romance, history, and philosophy, all entwined into a juicy supernatural tale. What could be better?
Here, we follow the story of vampire Louis, told from his perspective, as he painstakingly searches to unravel the mystery of his immortality. The story, although it is about vampires, seems to ride along the lines of man's neverending search for the history and purpose of human life. At least that's the analogy that I got.
Anne Rice does such a fantastic job of weaving the story through her character's personalities. She effortlessly pulls a reader back and forth through time, and across miles, writing stories within her stories. Absolutely spellbinding stuff!
One word of advice: If you haven't already, don't see the movie before you read the book. I watched the movie for the second time while I was smack in the middle of the book... kinda broke the magic of the story for me. The movie, although I enjoyed it on it's own account, does not even come close to the fun of this read.
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Interview with the Vampire
Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice (Paperback - March 18 1997)
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