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4.8 out of 5 stars
Night
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on March 17, 2006
This personal account of the holocaust by Elie Wiesel's book is a horrifying story of the Nazi death camps. The author tells the story in a simple manner, yet it is easy for a reader to end up feeling haunted by the accounts in NIGHT. It stirs sadness and profound questions in the bosom of a reader. The lessons from this book about the evil side of fallen human nature and the faith, courage and moral strength to fight the evil must never be forgotten. I recommend this book to any reader interested in the holocaust and the specter of mass killings plaguing the world today. DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE, SURVIVAL IN AUSCHWITZ, UNION MOUJIK, SHAKE HANDS WITH THE DEVIL, TRIPLE AGENT DOUBLE CROSS, POL PLO: ANATOMY OF A NIGHTMARE, GULAG ARCHIPELAGO are also recommended reads to help have a better understanding of threat humanity faces from the evil ideologies of hate.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon September 29, 2007
First of all, let me say that this is the very first book about the Holocaust I've ever read. I've seen documentaries about the holocaust, images, and newspaper articles, but I've never read a first-hand account until now. This book completely blew me away. I read it continuously over 2 days and learned about determination, love, loss, cruelty, compassion, and of the lucky few who survived. Like many, I had some idea that the holocaust was about gas chambers and furnaces used to kill and cremate human beings. I had no idea, however, of the many other hardships imposed on the Jews during the Holocaust, both before, leading up to, and - for the lucky few - after the mass killings. I'd recommend this book without reservation to anyone interested in learning about this horrific, brutal period of human history, as told with great honesty by someone who lived through it. As Elie Wiesel writes, "we must never forget". -5/5
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
"Night" is such a quick read that there is not enough time to lose interest, even for a moment. A reader should be constantly immersed in its emotions, and that makes this book so powerful.

Elie Wiesel shared his plight with many Jews in WWII. But people are forgetting. Anti-Semitism is on the rise around the world. Holocaust-deniers still have an influence on their audiences.

A book like this (retranslated from its 1958 original) is an important reminded of the atrocities committed by the Nazis, and a potent reminder of the worldwide need to prevent further pogroms and injustices.

Borrow, rent or buy. But read this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on March 14, 2006
An incredible book is a great understatement. Wiesel's Night will move you to tears, and move you to anger, and move you to want to follow up on his words by reading what he had written. This is supposed to be fiction, but, it is so close to the truth of the actual events that transpired in Wiesel's life that it might as well be treated as autobiographical. Night is part of a series - Night, Dawn, and The Accident - and although a different author Giorgio Kostantinos's masterful--' The Quest ' each element stands alone with integrity. You will find yourself asking many questions, How does one deal with survival after such atrocities as that at Birkenau and Auschwitz? How can one have faith in the world? How can one accept that a people so closely identified with a powerful God can ever accept that God again? Where is God in the midst of such things? Wiesel has spent his life in search of such answers, but doesn't provide them here. Why then would one want to read such accounts as these? Wiesel was silent for many years, Wiesel proclaims that there is in the world now a new commandment - 'Thou shalt not stand idly by' when such things are happening, one must act. One must remember the past in all its personal aspects to both honor those who suffered and to forestall such things happening again. This is the longest short book you ll ever read. It is one that will stay with you from the first page, and you'll never be able to shake the images brought forth, the misery and suffering, the existence of evil and brutality, the sadness and desolation. You'll discover that story don't always end with a happy ending. There is no happy ending here, even Wiesel's own survival is a questionable good here. How does one live after this?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 1, 2007
A truly magnificent novel, all-be it a short one. An incredible book is a great understatement. Wiesel's NIGHT will move you to tears, and move you to anger, and move you to want to follow up on his words by reading what he had written. This is supposed to be fiction, but, it is so close to the truth of the actual events that transpired in Wiesel's life that it might as well be treated as autobiographical. NIGHT is part of a series - Night, Dawn, and The Accident You will find yourself asking many questions, How does one deal with survival after such atrocities as that at Birkenau and Auschwitz? How can one have faith in the world? How can one accept that a people so closely identified with a powerful God can ever accept that God again? Where is God in the midst of such things? Wiesel has spent his life in search of such answers, but doesn't provide them here. Why then would one want to read such accounts as these? Wiesel was silent for many years, Wiesel proclaims that there is in the world now a new commandment - 'Thou shalt not stand idly by' when such things are happening, one must act. One must remember the past in all its personal aspects to both honor those who suffered and to forestall such things happening again. This is the longest short book you ll ever read. It is one that will stay with you from the first page, and you'll never be able to shake the images brought forth, the misery and suffering, the existence of evil and brutality, the sadness and desolation. You'll discover that story don't always end with a happy ending. There is no happy ending here, even Wiesel's own survival is a questionable good here. How does one live after this? How does the world go on? If you enjoyed the book THE CORRECTIONS by Franzen, or the novel THE DOOMSDAY BOOK, then you'll take to this one.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 16, 2006
This personal account of the holocaust by Elie Wiesel's book is a horrifying story of the Nazi death camps. The author tells the story in a simple manner, yet it is easy for a reader to end up feeling haunted by the accounts in NIGHT. It stirs sadness and profound questions in the bosom of a reader. The lessons from this book about the evil side of fallen human nature and the faith, courage and moral strength to fight the evil must never be forgotten. I recommend this book to any reader interested in the holocaust and the specter of mass killings plaguing the world today. DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE, SURVIVAL IN AUSCHWITZ, UNION MOUJIK, SHAKE HANDS WITH THE DEVIL, TRIPLE AGENT DOUBLE CROSS, POL PLO: ANATOMY OF A NIGHTMARE, GULAG ARCHIPELAGO are also recommended reads to help have a better understanding of threat humanity faces from the evil ideologies of hate.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 31, 2007
`Night' is a poignant, evocative story of a young Elie Wiesel and his father and their experiences in a number of concentration camps during WWII. The translation from French is done beautifully, as it is written in a plain, straightforward manner, and it reads with an eloquence and softness that belies the subject matter. As you read `Night', you find yourself cringing, eyes wide with horror, and it gives you a sick feeling in the pit of your stomach to know that innocent human beings were subjected to physical and emotional pain beyond belief. It is not graphic in the sense that there is too much information, it tells, in its simplicity, the truth of what one person experienced at one time, on this earth. Sixty years later, we believe what history has shown us of these atrocities, yet do we understand? In `Night', Elie Wiesel attempts to make us understand. He talks about Death with a capital "D" and "The Selection" of people for slaughter. His sadness and despair during his incarceration, as well as his alarming indifference to certain things in the name of survival, permeate each page. Finally, we realize that this book is written as a tribute to his father and his father's beliefs that "Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented" and keep the memory alive, "Because if we forget, we are guilty, we are accomplices". So Elie Wiesel will not stay silent, and we must never forget.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 13, 2006
While I didn’t live through (or wasn’t even alive at the time) that the horrors occurred, I’ve always felt deeply affected by them. The movie “Schindler’s List” blew me away, as did the book and movie “Sophie’s Choice.” But just when you thought it was safe to go back into the water, another book comes along that makes even those classics pale. Actually this book is not new, but Oprah’s bringing it to the forefront has once again brought it to our attention. The story I don’t need (or want) to go into here. You can read the other reviews for that. But what amazed me about this well-written book was its pacing, style, and overall “well put togetherness.” “Night” is appropriate titled: simplistic yet all encompassing. Even if you saw the movie “Schindler’s List,” you MUST read the book—it’s even better.
Must also recommend the book “Inner Voices, Inner Views” which is a collection of interviews with famous authors.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 4, 2006
A truly magnificent novel, all-be it a short one. An incredible book is a great understatement. Wiesel's Night will move you to tears, and move you to anger, and move you to want to follow up on his words by reading what he had written. This is supposed to be fiction, but, it is so close to the truth of the actual events that transpired in Wiesel's life that it might as well be treated as autobiographical. Night is part of a series - Night, Dawn, and The Accident - and although a different author Giorgio Kostantinos's masterful--' The Quest ' each element stands alone with integrity. You will find yourself asking many questions, How does one deal with survival after such atrocities as that at Birkenau and Auschwitz? How can one have faith in the world? How can one accept that a people so closely identified with a powerful God can ever accept that God again? Where is God in the midst of such things? Wiesel has spent his life in search of such answers, but doesn't provide them here. Why then would one want to read such accounts as these? Wiesel was silent for many years, Wiesel proclaims that there is in the world now a new commandment - 'Thou shalt not stand idly by' when such things are happening, one must act. One must remember the past in all its personal aspects to both honor those who suffered and to forestall such things happening again. This is the longest short book you ll ever read. It is one that will stay with you from the first page, and you'll never be able to shake the images brought forth, the misery and suffering, the existence of evil and brutality, the sadness and desolation. You'll discover that story don't always end with a happy ending. There is no happy ending here, even Wiesel's own survival is a questionable good here. How does one live after this? How does the world go on?
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
I recall when I first read 'Night', it was just after Elie Wiesel had given a lecture at my university. It was in the mid-1980s, and the lecture hall was standing-room-only. Wiesel's presentation moved us to tears, and moved us to anger, and moved me to want to follow up on his words by reading what he had written.
This is supposed to be fiction, but in a style that seems to be typical of many modern Israeli novelists, it is so close to the truth of the actual events that transpired in Wiesel's life that it might as well be treated as autobiographical. This is actually part of a trilogy - Night, Dawn, and The Accident - although each element stands alone with integrity.
How does one deal with survival after such atrocities as that at Birkenau and Auschwitz? How can one have faith in the world? How can one accept that a people so closely identified with a powerful God can ever accept that God again? Where is God in the midst of such things?
Wiesel himself as spent his life in search of such answers, but doesn't provide them here. Why then would one want to read such accounts as these? Wiesel was silent for many years, until he was brought into speech and writing as a witness to the events. Wiesel proclaims that there is in the world now a new commandment - 'Thou shalt not stand idly by' - when such things are happening, one must act. One must remember the past in all its personal aspects to both honour those who suffered and to forestall such things happening again (which, given the the depressing repetitive nature of history, is a difficult task).
This is the longest short book I've ever read. It is one that has stayed with me from the first page, and I've never been able to shake the images brought forward, the misery and suffering, the existence of evil and brutality, the sadness and desolation. We live in a culture that likes to gloss over pain and suffering, mask it with drugs and other things, and always end the story with a happy ending.
There is no happy ending here - even Wiesel's own survival is a questionable good here. How does one live after this? How does the world go on?
One thing is certain, we must never forget, and this book is part of that active remembering that we are called to do.
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