Customer Reviews


103 Reviews
5 star:
 (88)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (7)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High school girlie sounds off....
Well I'm a high school sophomore and for our first reading assignment this year in AP English (our work begins in summer), we were told to choose a book and write an essay on it about the significance of the connection between a parental figure and the children, and how it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. OMG!!! This is an excellent, fascinating book!! I...
Published on July 6 2004 by As the Bird Flies

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Where are the WMD?
It was a boring book, and I couldn't finish it.
Published on April 21 2004 by G. W. Bush


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High school girlie sounds off...., July 6 2004
This review is from: Brothers Karamazov (Paperback)
Well I'm a high school sophomore and for our first reading assignment this year in AP English (our work begins in summer), we were told to choose a book and write an essay on it about the significance of the connection between a parental figure and the children, and how it contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. OMG!!! This is an excellent, fascinating book!! I just chose it randomly and it has become my favorite book of all time. The depth at which Dostoevsky explores his characters' emotions, his sincerity and self-deprecation, all those paragraphs on humanity (hehe)....If any one book defines quality literature, it is this one alone. I am disappointed that the author died before creating the sequel, but I doubt that he could have topped himself after writing this book. There are multitudes of great essays you could write about the themes in this story, on a million different subjects. Wow. Well, I don't know how much the humble opinion of a high schooler matters to y'all, but in my short years I have read a great amount of classic literature and nothing comes close to The Brothers Karamazov.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Translation Makes Such a Difference, July 19 2007
By 
E. Haensel (Toronto) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Brothers Karamazov (Hardcover)
Two the previous reviewers discussed other translators than the two that according to the above description translated this book. I have a soft cover copy of Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation (as well as a copy of a translation of this book by Constance Garnett and David Magarshack)

This is the third translation that I have read of Dostoevsky's Brother's Karamazov. I must say that this translation is stunning in its improvement over the previous two. (As a side note I have read nine other Dostoevsky books in countless translations and due find the ones by these two translators to be far superior to the rest, though Hugh Aplin's translation of Poor People would come second.)

The joy that I experienced reading this translation of Dostoevsky's incomparable masterpiece is hard to explain...really it is just a book.

But what an amazing book. This translation captures the incredible mirth that underlies and levitates this seemingly dark and haunting murder mystery/philosophic treatise. It will make you laugh, cry, furrow your brows in consternation and think deeply about the nature of existence.

This translation won the Pen/Book of the month Club translation prize, it is clear why, it has taken the fax quality rendition of the novel we had under previous translation and rendered it in vivid color and texture, reading this version is like seeing a Van Gogh or Dali painting in real life, like being at a concert instead of listening to a recording.

Oh, by the introduction and accompanying explanatory notes (on everything from religious mis-quotations, to russian-ized polish expressions) is itself worth the new edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Could be no less than five stars., July 9 2004
By 
Daniel C. Wilcock "journal-ist" (Washington, D.C.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Brothers Karamazov (Paperback)
I cannot compare this translation to the others. Like most mortals, I rarely read 800 page books more than once. However, I can attest that The Brothers Karamazov, as translated here, combines the moving human drama we expect from Dostoevsky with liberal dose of wry humor. The text seems modern and fresh, the circumstances and petty humor surrounding the characters so central to the human predicament that the story is timeless.
And what a story: It is (among many things) a satire of human corruption, a meditation on faith and religious institutions in an age of skepticism, a murder mystery involving love triangles, a courtroom thriller and in the end a testament to the goodness and bravery humans are capable of.
The story follows the lives of old man Karamazov, a filthy penny-pinching lech and his three sons. Each son represents a different side to the Russian character: Dimitri the spoiled lout (or the prodigal son), Ivan the tortured intellect, and Alyosha the spiritual searcher.
Alyosha, Dostoevsy says, is our hero. And he does represent a certain Christian ideal. He, in the end, stands for brotherhood and meekness in the face of temptation. These qualities, no doubt, are what Dostoevsky suggests will preserve and redeem the Russian nation. All around Alyosha is the carnage caused by people who are not awake to this truth -- and they wallow in suffering.
This book, the last Dostoevsky wrote, also presents an intricate political/religious landscape. We see Russia on the brink of socialist forment, and the church is not spared in the skepitism of characters like Ivan, who, in the 'Grand Inquisitor' chapter, presents the most spine tingling critique of organized religion I've ever read.
But, after 800 pages Brothers Karamazov is a book that burns so brightly and is so capable of moving a reader that the book's cost will seem paltry and the reader who comes through will find his or her knowledge of the human soul expanded. A+.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading, April 14 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Brothers Karamazov (Paperback)
This is the best translation I ever expect to see of the Brothers Karamazov. This novel is a masterpiece and I highly recommend you read it (NOW).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Dostoevsky's Best Novel, July 19 2004
By 
This review is from: Brothers Karamazov (Paperback)
Dostoevsky's The Brother's Karamazov was his last and greatest novel. It's 19th century style is wordy and slow (at times) by modern standards, but that does not detract from it. This was written in the last year of his life, and Dostoevsky focused all of his considerable talent into this dark tale of patricide. The plot is gripping, the characters are memorable, the setting is real, and the style is excellent. Only a few books rival it in depth, pathos and vision. A masterpiece.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The first-ever troll on Amazon?, July 16 2004
By 
George_R (Somewhere in the Midwest) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Brothers Karamazov (Paperback)
Regarding the review "Clearly, a young writer to watch".
Guys, this was obviously a troll, and it worked beautifully.
The interesting question is, is he the first ever troll on
Amazon book reviews?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A reminder of the great genius of man., April 22 2003
By 
Russell Fanelli (Longmeadow, MA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Brothers Karamazov (Hardcover)
The Brothers Karamazov is one of the greatest novels ever written. It is a book not simply to be read, but to be studied, discussed, and loved. I am reviewing the hard cover edition and recommend that anyone who buys this book purchase the highest quality edition possible. One reading will not suffice and the second reading will repay the reader who now knows the story and searches for the lessons to be learned from patient study.
The brothers could not be more unlike. Dmitry, the hothead who acts first and then learns to repent later for all his misdeeds, is everyman and is the most easy to identify with, at least for me. He is filled with anger and resentment and hurts deeply the people he loves most. He is the prodigal son who repents too late to be forgiven by a father he dispises.
Ivan, the intellectual, lives in a world of ideas, but the action which springs from those ideas is repellant to him. He needs most to repent, but his proud spirit prevents him from learning that humility is needed to live a full and rewarding life. He is Lucifer who falls from grace. Like Lucifer, Ivan's hubris prevents him from seeking redemption.
Alyosha is the person we would all be if we had the strength to correspond to God's grace, freely given, but dependant on self-denial and a willingness to serve others. Like Prince Myshkin in The Idiot, another great novel by Dostoyevsky, he is an example of a good man, a modern day St. Francis of Assisi, who imitates Christ and appears, for that reason, childlike and unable to confront the evil of this world. He does not love his life in this world and is not afraid of losing it.
This brief review does not even scratch the surface. Those readers who want to know more about this great book will find many fine critiques to help deepen their understanding of Dostoyevsky's intent with this novel.
Yet it is not necessary to be a scholar to enjoy The Brothers Karamazov. The reader who patiently bides his time as we are introduced to the main themes of the novel -- the duty we have to honor our parents, even when,like Old Karamazov, they are almost impossible to love, the courage to live by faith when faith seems to be an absurdity, the willingness to live according to the truth when the crowd makes such a stand seemingly impossible -- will be rewarded with a story that involves us completely in the lives of a cast of characters which represent all aspects of the human condition.
The hardcover edition will take its place proudly beside the best novels in any person's library and will be taken down from time to time from the shelf, if not to be completely reread, at least to be reminded of the great genius of man.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Translation Makes Such a Difference, July 19 2007
By 
E. Haensel (Toronto) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Brothers Karamazov (Paperback)
This is the third translation that I have read of Dostoevsky's Brother's Karamazov (the other two being one by David Magarshack and one by Constance Garnett). I must say that this translation is stunning in its improvement over the previous two. (As a side note I have read nine other Dostoevsky books in countless translations and due find the ones by these two translators to be far superior to the rest, though Hugh Aplin's translation of Poor People would come second.)

The joy that I experienced reading this translation of Dostoevsky's incomparable masterpiece is hard to explain...really it is just a book.

But what an amazing book. This translation captures the incredible mirth that underlies and levitates this seemingly dark and haunting murder mystery/philosophic treatise. It will make you laugh, cry, furrow your brows in consternation and think deeply about the nature of existence.

This translation won the Pen/Book of the month Club translation prize, it is clear why, it has taken the fax quality rendition of the novel we had under previous translation and rendered it in vivid color and texture, reading this version is like seeing a Van Gogh or Dali painting in real life, like being at a concert instead of listening to a recording.

Oh, by the introduction and accompanying explanatory notes (on everything from religious mis-quotations, to russian-ized polish expressions) is itself worth the new edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dostoevsky digs deep..., June 11 2003
By 
Wesley L. Janssen (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Brothers Karamazov (Hardcover)
The finest fiction ever written? Some would say so. There is a great deal of philosophical argument and psychological investigation in these great, rambling discourses. There is mystery, murder, intrigue, obsession, romantic entanglement, and courtroom drama. But first, of the drudgery...
Ya ne govoryu po russki... Alexei is Alyosha is Lyoshechka. Ivan is Vanechka. Dmitri is Mitya is Mitka is Mitenka. Agrafena Alexandrovna is Grushenka is Grusha. The elder Zosima is rather a saint. Not only because of his patience, humility, gentleness, and refusal to judge others, but because we must know him only by this one name! Perhaps it's not all that bad, by the time you are, say, 400 pages into our story (about half way through), you will have made your peace with such nuances. Some readers will be troubled by the length of sentences and of paragraphs, typically sentences may contain 6 to 12 commas, they're huge. The exclamatory devices in many dialogues seem [to this reader] to be 'over the top', so to speak, as if Dostoevsky, in his mind's eye, was seeing his story played-out on stage. Perhaps this is just my ignorant perspective.
Enough detraction. The Brothers Karamazov is said to be a master's masterpiece. I will not argue, in this regard, with those who know such things far better than I. Dostoevsky digs deep into the psyche of his central characters, and sometimes the peripheral characters as well. Perhaps more so than any other great novelist. Each of these characters becomes startlingly complex (in many cases we might even say schizophrenic). For example, we meet a monk known for his resolute silence, who suddenly just won't shut-up. Of the Karamazov's, Fyodor and Dmitri are pathological slaves to their self-focused passions, although in Dmitri we come to find a surprising glimmer of possibility. (If you are close to someone terribly like Fyodor, you have my sympathy). The restrained and calculating Ivan is hardheaded and hard-hearted, and to his own demise, his calculating is rather blinded by his over confidence and sense of his own intelligence. The spiritual pilgrim, Alexei -- gentle, humble, careful, encouraging, and in a sense fearless -- is the author's hero, is everyone's rock in the storm, seems burdened only by other's burdens.
Apart from the author's ability to plumb the depths of the human soul, this reader was surprised at the sophistication and integrity of the Russian legal and judicial processes in the 1870's. I won't disclose the story any further except to note that Dostoevsky intended to further examine his characters in subsequent volumes, but died somewhat suddenly preparing this work for publication.
In its philosophic and psychological aspects, this book remains insightful and relevant. Dostoevsky modestly considered himself a dabbler in philosophy. But who isn't? Philosophy is, after all, the love of thought, not the perfect mastery of it, and Dostoevsky emerges as a thinker of greater stature than he conceived himself. He is often included in the 'short list' of great moral philosophers (with Plato and Kierkegaard, for example), and of the great existentialists (with Kierkegaard and Nietzsche).
The central existentialist question, that is of the existence of God, is examined not only in the conversations between Ivan (a professing atheist) and his brother Alexei, but is an enigma for Ivan even in his private moments, perhaps especially in his moments of delirium. In his "The Grand Inquisitor," Ivan argues a case against God from the existence of evil and injustice. This is the classic Enlightenment argument that there is no God because God 'wouldn't do it that way.' One problem with an argument citing evil and injustice is that it must posit a cognition of goodness and of justice. How do we explain such a cognition if there is no God? If there is no God there is nothing 'higher' to which our passions must answer, excepting perhaps the passions of others. In other words, "all is permitted." Yet we sense that this simply isn't the case. It seems that having weighed the argument from the existence of pain and suffering, Dostoevsky holds it to be the troubled rantings of finite man shaking his fist at the Infinite. But we can only surmise this, as Dostoevsky's masterpiece simply stops...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Where are the WMD?, April 21 2004
By 
G. W. Bush (Washington, D.C.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Brothers Karamazov (Paperback)
It was a boring book, and I couldn't finish it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Brothers Karamazov
Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky (Paperback - May 1 2002)
CDN$ 19.95 CDN$ 14.44
Usually ships in 3 to 5 weeks
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews