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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Creative Genius Unbound.
We're approaching the 100th anniversary of the action in Ulysses and I've taken my copy out and began to reread it. No other book I know of has more power to inspire or instill creative thought. His symbolism and skill is simply astounding. Anthony Burgess once said that many times he'd think of Ulysses and then think about his own work, "Why bother?" I know...
Published on June 9 2004 by Bernard Chapin

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars CD only
Do not buy this CD to listen to in the car! The selections and interpretation of this abridged audio edition are unimpeachchable. However the reader, gifted with a clear and expressive voice, presents most of the narration sotto voce, which is inaudible on the road even at top volume.
Published on June 9 2004 by Ben Franklin Intermediate School


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Creative Genius Unbound., June 9 2004
By 
Bernard Chapin "Ora Et Labora!" (CHICAGO! USA) - See all my reviews
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Ce commentaire est de: Ulysses (Hardcover)
We're approaching the 100th anniversary of the action in Ulysses and I've taken my copy out and began to reread it. No other book I know of has more power to inspire or instill creative thought. His symbolism and skill is simply astounding. Anthony Burgess once said that many times he'd think of Ulysses and then think about his own work, "Why bother?" I know what he meant, but the power of the characters and style gives everday writers like myself something to strive for. This book is worth more than ten creative writing courses in the Ivy League. Even if I wanted to, I could never forget it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars --Introibo ad altare Dei, July 19 2004
Ce commentaire est de: Ulysses (Hardcover)
I wrote this review previously w/ my other Amazon account but now that I changed email addresses, I'm going to publish this review in this account
Ulysses is considered by me to be the greatest book ever written. Now the following review is just the very basic storyline, in order to even begin to fathom the magnitude of it's magnificence, you need to read the other reviews and so here it is. It describes in florid detail a single day in the life of Leopold Bloom, his wife Molly and Stephen Dedalus, a young would-be-writer -- a character based on Joyce himself. Bloom, a Jewish advertising salesman, spends the day wandering through the streets and offices, pubs and brothels of 1904 Dublin
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great but difficult book, March 13 2006
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Ce commentaire est de: Modern Classics Ulysses (Paperback)
If you’re looking for a modern page-turner, a la “Da Vinci Code” by Brown or “Katzenjammer” by J. McCrae, then look someplace else. This is NOT it. ULYSSES is a classic in the same way that Proust’s work is, but easy to read? Don’t think so. It is worth your time trying to get through this tome, the same way it is with “Atlas Shrugged” or other classics that take a bit of getting used to. Most readers probably won't be able to approach this famous novel without some outside aid, but don't let that deter you. I've read parts of it many times and still haven't any idea what the central theme is supposed to be, yet it remains a fascinating work. The book is less about plot and character as it is about the creative use of language - stream-of-consciousness, changing narrators, parodies and other rhetorical devices are some of the techniques Joyce uses to the fullest. This is one of those rare books that can be read over and over and something new understood each time. For that alone, I recommend this to curious readers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, Dec 6 2003
Ce commentaire est de: Ulysses (Hardcover)
Brilliant book, a web of words encompassing centuries of literature and philosophy and its impasse on the overeducated lower middle class, a perfect allusion to a work of great literature (The Odyssey) that this book has matched well. Perhaps this is the first book to transcend the ability of what it has parodied. To those who have denied recommending it to someone of sixteen or seventeen, I had been upon this earth for a decade and a half when I came upon it, and just reread it one year later. Granted, you need a Latin dictionary and a good book of annotations to thoroughly understand it, but this book has made me realize just what a waste my public rural high school education was--Ulysses is literary heaven and hell and propagator of autodidacticism and eschews all principles of what has ever been said to create this century's magnum opus. I am exactly one-hundred years younger than James Joyce (and Stephen Daedalus), and on the sixteenth of June in 2004 I plan to! take the route of Leopold Bloom to vicariously relive it. One thing to be forewarned about: it is highly addictive. I have developed Ulysses codependency, as will anyone who gets through it. My head aches after reading it, for it is the best kind of masterpiece, the kind that attacks physically and intellectually at once. It is vulgar, carnal, and base (for its time, that is) and at once completely holy and pure because it has allowed the world to start over. Joyce is the avant-garde. He is our master philosopher and psychiatrist, who wrote the book that will never be shredded.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars CD only, June 9 2004
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Ce commentaire est de: Ulysses 4D (Audio CD)
Do not buy this CD to listen to in the car! The selections and interpretation of this abridged audio edition are unimpeachchable. However the reader, gifted with a clear and expressive voice, presents most of the narration sotto voce, which is inaudible on the road even at top volume.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Stick to the original., June 13 2000
By 
Dutertre (Portland, OR) - See all my reviews
Ce commentaire est de: Ulysses (Paperback)
A couple things: First off, everyone's heard of Ulysses, and everyone has their own notions of what they expect from a book, what they expect from Ulysses in particular, and how they feel about experimental literature in general (though by today's standards Ulysses appears vastly less experimental than, say, Finnegan's Wake). So basically, if you don't think you'll like Ulysses, you probably won't. And no, it's not a casual read. If you're willing to do some homework, though, which in my case included some Homer, Shakespeare, Freud, and Irish history (though I could go on), it just might be worth your time (lots of time) to slog through all 900+ pages of the thing. But that's just my two cents.
The real reason I'm writing this review is to steer people away from the 'reader's edition' of Ulysses--that's the reason for the two stars. This is not the novel as Joyce intended--it is an adaptation by Danis Rose, and reflects what he (Rose) thought was 'accurate.' Though the changes he makes are minor--and, in all fairness, may correct oversights made by Joyce--I am offended by the idea that an editor has the ability to take an important and influential work and make changes as he sees fit. The fact that this edition was ever put to print debases the role of the artist (any artist), and reflects the increasing trend toward commercialization and dumbing-down of art in favor of turning a profit.
So--is Ulysses the greatest artistic achievement in any medium, ever? I don't know, and whether I think so is irrelevant anyway. But if you want to find out for yourself, please, PLEASE, at least read Joyce's words, not Rose's.
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1.0 out of 5 stars no, Feb. 25 2014
By 
Andy Vogt (Libau,Manitoba,Canada.) - See all my reviews
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Achat Amazon vérifié(Quest-ce que cest?)
Ce commentaire est de: Ulysses (Paperback)
I might just be too dumb to work my way through this unpunctuated trash. Sorry. Not for me. This tripe gave me a headache.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Kindle cheapens Ulysses, July 17 2013
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P. Salus (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
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Ce commentaire est de: Ulysses (Kindle Edition)
Ulysses is (to me) the most important novel of the 20th Century. I have read it nearly every June since the late 1950s. I obtained a Kindle a while back, and have been reading on it, as it is lighter to carry and to read in bed.

Unfortunately, much of Ulysses has been maimed in the transfer to electronics: the itemization of Bloom's expenses (in the Ithaca section) is rendered absurd by listing items on on scheen and the amounts on the next one. Molly's final soliloquy -- some of the finest half-dozen pages in English literature -- is made nonsensical as "I'll" is reproduced as III (Roman 3).

Ulysses is still a great novel: the Kindle version is a disaster.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "Just you try it on.", Sept. 5 2012
'Ulysses' is surrounded as much by controversy as brilliance. In his masterwork, Joyce moulds his theories on narrative, humanity, and philosophy into a complex view of Dublin at the turn of the Twentieth Century. It is a great book mired by difficulty. Many readers avoid 'Ulysses' because of its difficulty, which is unfortunate because these intricacies are highlights. Joyce ambitiously portrays the psychological worlds of his characters as they go about their day. That's what 'Ulysses' is: one long day that parallels Homer's 'Odyssey'.

My favourite part of this book was its impact on narratology. Joyce's core style has a third person omniscient narrator, but also slips into the subjectivity of characters through interior monologues. This was a huge moment for literature, because it shows a shift from the description of thought to thought itself. It gives the reader direct access to the characters. Joyce's movement between his heroes' thoughts and their exterior world illustrates how they relate to it. By choosing this kind of narrative, Joyce can demonstrate the ironies and multiple perspectives that surround Leopold Bloom's actions in the book. The primary feature of this book is parallax.

However, Joyce's revolutionary approach to writing also cripples it. Stephen Dedalus's dense monologues aside, Joyce simply does TOO MUCH. 'Ulysses' suffers in its final half from constant changes to the narrative. After the tenth episode, Joyce uses a new style each episode. So extreme is his ambition that he metaphorically "gives birth" to the English language in episode fourteen, "Oxen of the Sun." (My review's title uses the last sentence of that chapter.) I understand that Joyce uses different writing styles to present the effect they have on the text, but to what result? Some critics believe that Joyce's product justifies his method. While I respect this view, I also believe that literature requires clarity, which Joyce sacrifices for his boundless artistry.

As a book that celebrates the common man, 'Ulysses' operates on the irony that the status quo cannot understand all its treasures. I suspect this is part of Joyce's quirky sense of humour, and actually makes sense if you consider that irony. Despite the book's reputation, I recommend people to "try it on," and see what they take away. It is a heart-warming story, and very funny too, especially when Bloom and Stephen enter the brothel near the climax. Read 'Ulysses' for a laugh at what you know, and what you don't. If you enjoy it that much, then by all means study it to your heart's content.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Pages 561-703, the "Nighttown" part, is spectacular., Feb. 18 2007
Ce commentaire est de: Modern Classics Ulysses (Paperback)
I wish to comment on the Nighttown part which is written in script format as a theatrical piece. I have not read all of Ulysses, only about half. I was directed to the Nighttown part since Martin Esslin, in "The Theater of the Absurd", wrote that "nighttown" surpassed anything in the theater of the absurd movement, which I was familiar with and fond of. As it turns out, from my own opinion, this section of Ulysses does surpass anything from the absurd genre, or at least rivals anything therein. The nighttown part is probably the most unbound and experimental part of the novel. Aside from its random craziness, Joyce displays a level of eccentricity and surrealism that was far, very far ahead of its day - and is still top class today. Within these 140 pages there is plenty of folly, spontaneous cleverness, and unexpected possibilities. Alas, not everyone can appreciate this talent.
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Ulysses by James Joyce (Hardcover - March 5 2002)
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