Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Cook All-New Kindle Paperwhite Explore the Amazon.ca Vinyl LP Records Store Fall Tools

Customer Reviews

36
3.7 out of 5 stars
Robinson Crusoe
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$10.45+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on January 25, 2002
After seeing the movie Castaway with Tom Hanks I had an urge to read this book. It is an interesting autobiography-like story of Robinson Crusoe getting stranded on an island. It is easily a classic if you take into account when it was written, almost 300 years ago.
Reading this novel was like reading three books in one. Yes that's right, three for one!
You get to read about Robinson's wealth, inventory and production and he blabs on and on about his island's production. An example is he may say something like this: "I killed and ate 2 goats today and was pleased as well. Then I moved some sacks of rice from the cave to the castle." This gets quite boring but send a strong message that he went from having little to a great deal with hard work.
Another of the books in this novel is an example of man's previous Religious and Racial superiority complex. Robinson might say something like "Twas providence that guided me to find the savages and give me the chance to spread Christendom." Robinson lets it be known that he believes his culture is the correct one. You cannot look at this as political incorrectness, as no such thing existed. Around 1660 everyone throughout the world had this worldview and many people do today.
The third book within this novel is the historical perspective. You get to see how large world was before our modern era. Robinson travels to many location and needs to overcome many obstacles, often requiring he use his mind. He only knows the technology of his day, which he speaks of often.
The first half of the novel is boring. If you can tough it through the second half gets much more interesting. I would recommend this to anyone who read my review and still has an interest in Robinson Crusoe.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on October 28, 2001
Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe never lived with a number of other people on his deserted island, competing for food and immunity icons every week, a television camera constantly in his face. Crusoe lived his solitary life not for the entertainment of others, but to suffer the plight of the lonely.
Ignoring the advice of his wise father, who begged him to choose an honest life close to home, Crusoe heads to sea and almost dies three times before ending up on his deserted isle. He chooses a life of a plantation owner, hiring slaves to do much of his work. He chooses to ignore the teachings of God, and puts himself at the top of his own kingdom. On a journey to collect slaves to increase productivity on his plantation, his ship wrecks on the rocks of an island. All are lost but him. He saves some provisions from his ship, but has to work the land on his own to survive nearly three decades in solitude. It isn't until one lucky Friday that Crusoe's isolation ends and his purgatory is over.
Defoe's book is really a treatise on humility, of suffering for the sake of one's soul and finding one's place in the world. I enjoyed it thoroughly. Crusoe, alone for 400 pages, keeps our attention to the end.
This is a children's edition, put out by Simon and Schuster's Aladdin Paperbacks. What makes this a children's addition is the foreword by Avi, a children's author, and the reading guide at the end worded for children.
But there's little, really, to distinguish this edition from others. As a book for children, Robinson Crusoe needs more than a few simplistic questions and a wispy introduction. There is much in this book from another age that parents and children will want to discuss: racism, slavery, misuse of your fellow man, cannibalism, butchery. Defoe's readers believed that cannibals inhabited many of the unchartered islands of the southern hemisphere, and the children of today, though not stupid, will need guidance to disavow them of this same incorrect thought and others. We should not censor this book -- it's as much historical document as it is literature -- but parents should be aware of what their children are reading, read it with them, and help them understand the world as it was (and wasn't) 300 years ago.
I would have given this book 5 stars (Robinson Crusoe alone deserves 5 stars) except for the mistakes on the back cover --Unabridged spelled "Unabrdiged" -- and in Avi's foreword -- foreword spelled "foreward," comma splices, and a reference to Crusoe's 24 years on the island (he was on the island 28 years!). Errors creep into most books, but in a children's book a publisher should take more care to ensure that the information is accurate.
This is a beautiful edition, marred by errors and lacking in supporting reading. Any other edition would suffice.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 8, 2009
Great book! The beginning is a little long but give it a chance and it gets really good. Especially if you like tv shows like Survivor. It's a great story. People interested in Christianity might also like this book, as it has biblical referenced and the main character develops a special relationship with God.
Really great book for anyone!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 20, 2003
What I found surprising when you read this book is that when the characters described their environment or comrades, the vivid language they used in such times made you believe you were actually in the 1600's. I have rated this book four out of five stars because sometimes the language, the spelling, and the phrases became confusing, especially when dialogue was in use. I enjoyed this book because the fact that Daniel Defoe wrote in his time, the readers today get a well described 1600's English adventure story with 1600's pop culture. This book is very realistic, due to the fact that it was written in the time that the story was taking place, so the authenticity of this book written in its own time is "through the roof" compared to a similar adventure story written today.
I would recommend this book to strong readers and those out to get a feeling of 1600's lifestyle, culture and technology.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on September 29, 2002
I just finsished reading Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, and let me tell you what a long story it was. It was written in old english, so at the start it was very confusing and hard to understand. But if you keep reading you get the hang if it. I thought it was a pretty good story. I think it would be so hard to live on this island all by yourself for twenty-four years have hardly anything. Then finally one day save a prisoner that ends up your friend, Friday. Followed by several more joining yor little island. The plot was good, and well written but it seems to drag on. Until the end, when he gets all these companions. The end went by so fast. First, he has all these friends and then they leave for England. He sells his plantation, gets married and has three kids. I gave it three star because it was hard to understand but very well written.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on November 30, 2002
"Robinson Crusoe"(can't underline), written by Daniel Defoe, teaches a life lesson through Crusoe's thrilling adventures and is recommended to people from age ten and up (minor violence is involved in the story). The story starts as young Robinson Crusoe faces a ship wreck and gets trapped in an uninhabited island. Desperate to survive, he attempts to create an environment where he can live with convenience. Through many conflicts, Robinson's wits are also shown, one of the things to catch while reading this book. Borrow the book from the library to experience the great excitement and to find out what happens to Crusoe in the island. This is one of those books that will make you stay up over mid-night.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 19, 2002
I recall reading this in grade school but as I re-read it as an adult I was pleasantly surprised by the depth of the character development and the psychological and spiritual insights that Robinson Crusoe reveals through his reflections. Much more that just a remarkable adventure tale and a lesson in self reliance which has become part of literary mythology this story resonates with a man's self discovery under difficult circumstances.
While the main outline of the plot is familiar and recognizable there is much to enjoy in the details that make this a book to read again.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 2, 2002
This is a great book filled with all sorts of adventures and lessons. Of course, with any book, it has its slow points, but the biggest word of caution is that it was written a long time ago and therefore is a little harder to read. However, if you can get past the difficult reading (which does get easier and easier as you get used to it), you will find a story with more excitement and thought provoking situations than you might have expected.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 24, 2002
It con-founds the mind to read someone's review of a 300 year old book and see that they were put out by all that 'religious stuff'. Like somehow the world has been wrong about one of the greatest works of literature for 3 centuries, that is until some Generation X-er comes along in 2001 and causes everyone to realize this is just a boring book, written by some racist capitalist guy who likes to use big words! Of course!, how could we have been so stupid?
No,'dude', this is a book about how we as humans will always suffer until we admit and submit to the one true God. In other words it's a religious journey. This is a book about the folly of youth, when you believe you can conquer the world and what happens when you try without any faith being involved in it.
As for the slavery aspect, the fact is Crusoe himself was made a slave for years and I don't hear anyone complaining about it. At this point in world history slavery or servitude was an accepted behavior, like it or not. Anyone could be a slave, of any race or color as the book points out. Friday submitted will-fully to Robinson out of gratitude for Crusoe having saved his life. He wasn't kept tied up out back like a dog, Robinson loved this man and his love was returned. Robinson loved him enough to teach him Christianity and to turn from his cannibal ways.
I love how it's always the 'open-minded' people who are the first to want to burn the books they don't like.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 19, 2003
Robinson Crusoe was my book club's choice for June. Only 2 out of the 12 of us stayed with it and read it. Crusoe indeed did live a fascinating life, but it is told in the most boring, tedious manner. Defoe's style of writing is dry and unemotional. I did remind myself the book was written almost 300 years ago, and was fresh and different from other novels written in the 1600's. I have read many wonderful tales of wilderness survival: Island of the Blue Dolphin, Hatchet, and The Cay, so my expectations were high. Defoe spends too much time on mudane daily activities and not enough on Crusoe's feelings. Most of the "juicy stuff" of interest happens in the last 1/4 of the book. I wish I had spent my time reading The Great Illustrated Classic version, this book desperately needs paring down.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Treasure Island
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson (Paperback - April 19 1993)
CDN$ 6.00

Robinson Crusoe
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe (Paperback - June 10 1998)
CDN$ 6.00