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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gentle friend
I have come through some very difficult few years of relationship changes in my life. What truly helped me was when I stopped searching in the obvious reltionship help areas and started searching for answers by studying the grieving process. I treat my "dis"-ease as a dying process. And I found the greatest empowerment in reading about terminal illness, and this dying...
Published on Nov. 28 2002 by Katarina Thorsen

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Ultra repetitive
The author takes a concept and repeats it over and over and over again using different metaphors. The main concept that he is pushing is: Let Go and Let God.
Published 12 months ago by Nola Johnson


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gentle friend, Nov. 28 2002
By 
Katarina Thorsen (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
I have come through some very difficult few years of relationship changes in my life. What truly helped me was when I stopped searching in the obvious reltionship help areas and started searching for answers by studying the grieving process. I treat my "dis"-ease as a dying process. And I found the greatest empowerment in reading about terminal illness, and this dying process- ESPECIALLY Stephen Levine's "Who Dies"- Conscious Living, Conscious Dying. By accepting the process of grieving and really embracing it, I walked step by step, looped around, turned inside out, but somehow forward to a new perspective. Stephen's gentle guidance is the most helpful "self"-help (universal-help) book I have come across. Not only is ALL OK- he does not make it sappy, or overwhelming. It is not preachy or self-righteous. I came across it- an old edition- by accident in my small town bookstore, on a day when the tears would not stop. I have used the book not only for my own grieving process, but to understand and let go of one friend's suicide and my other friend's terminal disease. To those struggling, you may find some peaceful moments in Levine's pages. Best wishes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read Chapter 4 if you read nothing else, Sept. 29 2000
This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
This is a one of my all time favorite and life changing books. I happened upon it rather accidentally on my mother's shelf when I was trying to remind myself of elizibeth Kubler's Ross's stages of greif model for coming to terms with a loss. I was not experiencing a death of a person per se, more of a loss of my own identity. I was in my medical residency and feeling the weight of responsibility, I was losing some outmoded self within. The text would consistently have a profound impact on my thinking and subsequently my mood, as it would allow me to pay better attention to my thought process in any given moment, and pay attention to how automatic my thoughts are and in some ways following very predictable patterns which I later learned were not fixed but rather changeable.
I read chapter 4 probably 2-3 dozen times, because each sentence, each paragraph carried great power which I could feel as the words lined up next to my own thoughts like training wheels next to a bike. There was a way that my entire thinking process became illuminated while reading the book, and it might last for a day or so and then I'd need to go back and do it all over again.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A life changing book, Nov. 15 2003
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This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
If I could give this book 10 stars, I would. I love Stephen Levine's poetic writing style. It is simple and clear as well as calming. This book changed my ideas about what it means to live life to the fullest. The pain meditations in this book changed the way that I experience pain. I recommend Who Dies? to anyone interested in their inner life but especially to those who are in pain (physical or emotional), or whose lives are changing in challenging ways.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Give up your fear of death and change your life, July 14 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
This book changed my life when I first read it more than 15 years ago. My father died when I was very young and that event left me terrified of death. Then I read "Who Dies?" and realized there was another way to look at death. The book also led me to begin working with people dying and/or grieving. The book is really about life. Live it now, today, because we never know when this precious gift will be over. Thank you, Stephen Levine.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Peace through acceptance and knowledge., Dec 28 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
Who Dies? can be a difficult book. It delves into how we live our lives, what creates joy and what creates suffering and how to accept both. Taking responsiblity for ourselves and accepting the truth of pain in life is the first step towards happiness. Levine urges us to be present and thoughtful in our actions. Through painful self evaluation, one can find acceptance. As with most spiritual writing, the reader must be ready for the teaching to appreciate it. Read what rings true to you, what draws you in and you will have a better understanding of how to be close to your soul. Keep the book around, and you may find an openess to other chapters, as you make your way on the path of growth. Every time I read it, there is a new teaching that I am ready to hear. This book, though philosophical, is not dry. It contains Levine's profound personal stories which illustrate his points.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Gift of Grieving Correctly, Oct. 29 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
We're not taught how to grieve. This book is the best primer available. I bought my first copy when my father passed 15 years ago. It has resided in my library since and been passed on to friends during their times of need. I now go to Amazon.com and ship out a copy when death visits the families of my friends. Thank you Stephen Levine.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book before you die!, Jan. 10 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
Very few books make reflection on death so calming, so refreshing. Read this book before you die!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Completely Insightful, Feb. 8 2014
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This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
What a very well written and insightful book on death, which is really about how one can better live and embrace life exactly as it is so that one can be better prepared to make the transition that is death.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Ultra repetitive, Aug. 30 2013
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This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
The author takes a concept and repeats it over and over and over again using different metaphors. The main concept that he is pushing is: Let Go and Let God.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What do you think of Zen Buddhism?, Feb. 2 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Who Dies?: An Investigation of Conscious Living and Conscious Dying (Paperback)
I cannot share the strong recommendations given by the other reviewers. The book is very heavily influenced by Zen Buddhism, and many of the thoughts and suggestions flow directly from Buddhist beliefs. For example, if one does not believe in reincarnation, many of the suggestions in the book make no sense at all. The book is mostly well-written and I suspect would be appreciated best by those with a strong belief in Eastern religions. Personally, I can't say I benefited much from this, though some points were quite interesting, such as that 'desire' is generally a source of pain.
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