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5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite books ever!
The first Vonnegut book I ever read, and the strangest I feel. The kid shoots some guy from a tower and his whole life falls apart due to that one event. He writes an atrociously parochial play that gets laughed at in the Big Apple of America. When writing about the failures of everyday life humanity, Vonnegut is at his best. This has all of the most tragically funny...
Published on July 10 2004 by Mr Stuart A Woolgar

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars eh...
It was ok. it was written in the usual eccentric vonnegut style, but i couldn't really get into it like I did with Bluebeard. Maybe i'm not reading into it deeply enough, i'm sure that's part of the case, but whatever. I found the whole tumor imagery especially disturbing, but i have to say that Rudy's playlets were hilarious.
Published on March 7 1999 by seugiya


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5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite books ever!, July 10 2004
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
The first Vonnegut book I ever read, and the strangest I feel. The kid shoots some guy from a tower and his whole life falls apart due to that one event. He writes an atrociously parochial play that gets laughed at in the Big Apple of America. When writing about the failures of everyday life humanity, Vonnegut is at his best. This has all of the most tragically funny events and characters woven into a nauseous tale. My favourite part is where the kid who writes the play, writes his own script of the situation of his brother arguing with his brother's girlfriend. Some call it black humour, I think that doesn't do it's creativity justice. A must read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Advice, Nov. 18 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
Read this after reading Breakfast of Champions, you'll enjoy it that much more.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Muted story, Oct. 17 2003
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
In Deadeye Dick, the underlying messages shine through Vonnegut's words, the morals of innocence, the corruption of being etc. etc.
But Vonnegut forgot one thing in this book. The story. What is in his other books a perfect mixture of story and the underlying morals, here it is a decidedly lop-sided affair. The story is very unengaging and I found it quite tedious, to be frank. And unfortunately, it went downhill after an ok-ish start. Thankfully, those recipes he throws in very frequently at the first part of the novel are toned down because what was a good idea would have turned into an annoying one if continued too frequently.
This is the most disappointing Vonnegut book I've read so far.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Very Good Book, July 28 2003
By 
Eric (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
This is the fourth Vonnegut book I have read, and I have to say it's probably one of his best. The story was interesting, and the moral was well received. I also enjoyed the fact that some of his characters from Breakfast of Champions made appearances in the book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Symbolic musings on the life of an unforgettable character, April 27 2003
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
Deadeye Dick is a novel only Kurt Vonnegut could have written - quirky, strange, thought-provoking, and a little bit depressing. The story of Deadeye Dick and his family is not a happy one. Rudy Waltz acquires his unusual nickname at the age of twelve by accidentally killing a woman in his hometown, but the whole story starts well before Rudy was even born. His father was supposedly a promising artist, or at least his own mother thought so, but he and his painting tutor did little more than travel around getting drunk and carousing with women of ill repute; after the tutor was exposed as a sham, Otto Waltz went to Austria to study in the years before the Great War; his lack of talent forbade him entry to the Academy, and he developed a friendship with another failed artist who later became chancellor of the Third Reich. This association with Hitler and some of his ideas would come back to haunt Otto in the 1940s. Rudy was Otto's second son, and on the day when his father bestowed upon him the key to the gun room, Rudy took a rifle up to the top of the cupola at his family's most unusual residence, fired it randomly, and unknowingly shot a pregnant woman right between the eyes while she was vacuuming - thus did Rudy receive the nickname Deadeye Dick. His father insisted on making a production about how everything was his fault, and life would never be the same again for the dysfunctional Waltz family. They lost everything, and life got little better as Rudy matured. The story of Deadeye Dick and his family goes on to include such events as a decapitation, a death by chimney (it was made of radioactive cement), and the eventual death of everyone in the whole town by way of an accidental neutron bomb explosion. There is a lot of symbolism in the book, and Vonnegut's discussion of what certain symbols mean in the introduction is particularly helpful in understanding this novel (although I'm still a little unsure about the random inclusion of recipes throughout the story). One experiences a definite lack of closure upon completing this fascinating read, and that inevitably disappoints some readers, including myself to some degree, but I don't think any can deny the fact that Deadeye Dick offers a typically Vonnegut-like interpretation of life and offers much food for thought to the serious reader.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Vonnegut is up to his old tricks, April 17 2003
By 
David Bonesteel (Fresno, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
Another failed Vonnegut character mopes through life, bemoaning his failures and viewing all with a jaundiced eye, as he waits for the end. This is a note that Vonnegut strikes often: a poor ineffectual fool passively accepts his fate in an absurd, random universe. The more Vonnegut I read, the more tired I become of this tune, but I must admit that the author makes some interesting points along the way.
This time the fool is Rudy Waltz, who gained the nickname of Deadeye Dick when he fired a gun into the air, inadvertantly killing a pregnant woman a block away. The story is fascinating and real when dealing with this tragic mistake and its consequences. I couldn't help but feel some disappointment as the more absurd qualities of the story (ie, neutron bombs and radioactive mantlepieces) asserted themselves. Vonnegut writes well about real people dealing with real problems. I wish he would have restrained himself from introducing so many surreal elements; they smack of gimmickry and self-conscious symbolism.
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5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful, March 21 2003
By 
erin (lenexa, ks) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
vonnegut is among my favorite authors and this book was not disappointing. it is actually currently competing with "god bless you mr. rosewater" for my favorite vonnegut book. this book is just too great to describe, you need to read it for yourself....
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2.0 out of 5 stars Maybe I'm Missing Something..., Oct. 8 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
After hearing so many extraordinary things about Kurt Vonnegut, particularly about Cat's Cradle, I jumped with delight when I saw Deadeye Dick selling for [$] at a used bookstand in NY. I'm beginning to wonder whether or not I could have used that [$] for something better.
I was thoroughly encapsulated by Vonnegut's unique style and honesty throughout his introduction and the first few chapters of the novel, which I later found was the best part. I felt as if the entire novel was a setup for some plot that was going to develop, but when I reached the end I realized that that was it. Not to mention that the only character with any character at all was Rudy's father. Yeah, yeah, the book had societal symbolism and isolated incidents that stood on their own without a plot, but the story in which they were presented literally had no point and went absolutely nowhere, therefore diluting the value of those rare gems of scenes. In addition, most of the dialogue seemed forced, melodramatic, and unrealistic at times. Novels about nothing can be good reads, but for some reason Vonnegut missed the mark. Tom Robbins and John Irving are much better at accomplishing a realistic sense of grotesque absurdity in their symbolism of the world.
I will give Vonnegut a second chance and will read Cat's Cradle. I hope I have a better experience.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Depressing, June 9 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
This is not among Vonnegut's best. The plot rambles, the jokes aren't very funny, and above all it's pretty depressing, and lacks meaning. I would recommend Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle or Slaughterhouse Five, but this one is best left unread.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic novel, Jan. 28 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Deadeye Dick: A Novel (Paperback)
Kurt Vonnegut is a master of observation and relation. This novel, Deadeye Dick, tells the tale of Rudy Waltz, who loses his innocence at a young age and struggles to get a grip on life. He is detached from life, and Vonnegut writes Rudy's struggle with such peircing honesty and clarity that you can't help but feel for Rudy. He finds you in Rudy Waltz - there's a little bit in here that we've all been through. Dusted with some quirky, often ironic humor here and there, Deadeye Dick is a touching novel and vastly under-appreciated.
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Deadeye Dick: A Novel
Deadeye Dick: A Novel by Kurt Vonnegut (Paperback - May 11 1999)
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