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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classis Grisham
Really liked this book. Its been a while since I read Grisham books, and I remember why I liked them. The Confession is a great read, highly recommend if you are a JG fan.
Published on Feb. 16 2011 by Deena

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting story but...
The Confession was an interesting read but it was so well padded, you would think John Grisham was being paid by the word
Published on Nov. 12 2010 by Sam9999


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting story but..., Nov. 12 2010
This review is from: The Confession: A Novel (Hardcover)
The Confession was an interesting read but it was so well padded, you would think John Grisham was being paid by the word
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classis Grisham, Feb. 16 2011
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Deena (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Confession: A Novel (Hardcover)
Really liked this book. Its been a while since I read Grisham books, and I remember why I liked them. The Confession is a great read, highly recommend if you are a JG fan.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grisham at his best, April 7 2011
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This review is from: The Confession: A Novel (Hardcover)
This is a book about which John Grisham clearly felt deeply - perhaps because he has recently become concerned about wrongful convictions, and the treatment of that theme here has a very passionate edge. Although Grisham has dealt with the countdown to an execution before in The Chamber, a similar plot device here has produced even more focused results. Grisham has translated his thoughts about what the real killer might be thinking and doing into an unsettling narrative, as the last hours of life ebb away for an innocent mann. The real killer's identity is given away at the beginning of The Confession.

Texas at the end of the last century: Travis Boyette is a deeply unpleasant man, unhappy with his worthless life. He is seduced by the thought that some small measure of comfort may be snatched by terrorising and subjugating another human being. His victim is to be a popular girl, a high-school student. He abducts, rapes and murders her before hiding her body.

But any fears that he might harbour about being tried for the crime vanish when an innocent man, Donté Drumm (where does Grisham find his names?), is arrested. Drumm, a local football star, finds himself the prime suspect and is convicted. Nine years pass on death row, and the stays of execution for Drumm are exhausted. He is to die in four days. The wretched killer, Boyette, has had a change of heart: a brain tumour and his own imminent death have persuaded him that he must make a clean breast of the murder. But is it too late?

The Confession is an airing for the beliefs of the author, but it is also a page-turner. Grisham is careful never to preach. He is much exercised by the fact that men have died in miscarriages of justice, and has pointed out that DNA evidence is forcing people to look again at such cases.

However, this novel suggests that perhaps Americans have become addicted to the speed with which conviction and execution can be carried out - and that opportunities for more careful consideration are too quickly passed over. It's this motivating force which perhaps makes the book one of the most personal Grisham has written, even though (largely speaking) he never forgets his primary purpose, which is to entertain. That mission he has been faithfully carrying out since his first book. There are no stylistic flourishes, but Grishamites will find all their buttons pressed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great, Jan. 18 2013
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Great book!!! Couldn't put it down until I was done and I'm not that much of a reader! Worth every penny
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GRISHAM DOES IT AGAIN, Dec 17 2012
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This review is from: The Confession: A Novel (Hardcover)
I've read several of Grishams' novels over the years. This is not his very best, but close to it.It's 417 pages of great story telling, not of the caliber of James Mitchner or James Clavell, but if you like the legal scene, this is for you. It's written in three parts: "The Confession," The Punishment" & "The Atonement."

I won't be giving anything away when I tell you that an old convict, dying of a brain tumor, confesses to a minister that the tragic murder of a high school girl, for which a young African-American is about to be executed in Huntsville, Texas, for the crime.. The whole book takes place in a period of 4 or 5 days.

What follows is a frantic 400 pages of reading enjoyment.

If you like Grishams' series of prolific authorship, you'll enjoy this one.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More Social Criticism than Legal Thrills, Nov. 11 2010
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Confession: A Novel (Hardcover)
"And though they found no cause for death in Him, they asked Pilate that He should be put to death." -- Acts 13:28 (NKJV)

If you ask most people whether they favor the death penalty, you'll get an opinion that's largely unrelated to the practical issues involved. The crusading death-penalty skeptic in John Grisham comes out in this novel, much as the social reformer in Charles Dickens can be found in David Copperfield and Oliver Twist.

If you are familiar with death penalty legal practice, you'll be impressed with the accuracy of the fictional portrayal here. Grisham knows what he's writing about.

If you read this book, you'll learn how easy it is for an innocent person to be convicted of murder in Texas, how expensive it is to put someone to death, and the various sordid agendas that can play out in death-penalty cases. As such, this book is a pretty good substitute for reading a nonfiction book on the same subject . . . the risk of the innocent being condemned to death. If you doubt that can happen, check out some Web site that shows how many convicted "murderers" have been found innocent through DNA testing, many years after the fact of false incarceration and much suffering.

But that's probably not why you pick up a John Grisham novel about the law. You probably want to read great stuff about how corrupt lawyers are. There's definitely some legal malpractice here, but there's also some unselfish legal practice. All in all, the book won't satisfy most people who want to see lawyers discredited.

I also didn't find that the book contained enough suspense to keep my interest at a high level. It seemed to me that the twists and turns of the plot were thoroughly telegraphed well in advance.

Ultimately, this is one of those depressing stories that some people will wish they had not read. Even where comeuppance occurs, it doesn't completely satisfy.

But as an entertaining read, The Confession is a pretty ordinary book compared to the best of what John Grisham has done in the past.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The tic. The pause., July 9 2014
Very legal and not very thriller. With this novel Grisham returns after "The Chamber" and "Innocent" to deal with the capital punishment and to denounce the American judicial system, of the states where it is still applied, for the manner in which it is too lightly used for political purposes.
The tagline on the cover ("An innocent man is days from execution. Only a guilty man can save him.") lets mistakenly think it is a thriller, although it is defined this way. In fact, this fictional, but entirely plausible (and that's what scares), story once again talks about the people, for good or especially bad. Its characters are damn real, starting with Travis Boyette, the one who confesses, who with his tics and pauses, his controversial personality of a criminal with feelings of guilt, because someone is paying for his crime, results in reader annoyance, disgust, but also pity. It isn't the classic villain, but a character who lives in the grey area between the light and the dark, someone in whom we can identify despite his story.
Here we see the talent of this writer, who with the achievement of a stable reputation is free of telling his stories, which do not have a final twist or a happy ending like in real life. But they are true, almost more than reality.
As the plot develops in an intentionally slow way, jumping from one place to another, you don't lose at all your concentration, but you are caught by it to the end. And even if it leaves with a bitter disappointment, at the same time there is something comforting, that makes you close the book with a sense of satisfaction. The one you feel after reading a good book.

Rita Carla Francesca Monticelli, author of Red Desert - Point of No Return
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4.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly enjoyable read,, May 21 2014
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I was happy to learn a lot about class-action lawsuits, because I was nearly killed by our medical system and mixed up medications, I just couldn't afford to get into it. At least I know what it all entails.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Need a holiday..., March 13 2014
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Reread this book (first read on release in 2010) in almost one sitting. Story sets a tense & breakneck pace. Chilling details about the abuse of justice by the very persons sworn to uphold it. Politics are as always depressingly realistic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best read ever!, Dec 20 2013
I literally could not put it down voluntarily. This has to be Grisham's best book.

5 - star for sure
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The Confession: A Novel
The Confession: A Novel by John Grisham (Hardcover - Oct. 26 2010)
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