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on February 3, 2016
Excellent
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on January 16, 2016
Hard copy arrived without dust cover.
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on December 17, 2015
I had heard of Kahneman and Taversky's biases in my studies as an investment advisor but the detail to which they are described in this book is remarkable. Everyone should read this book if only to learn more about how they and others think and makes decisions.
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on November 9, 2015
As a trial lawyer, in a firm with 8 other trial lawyers, I have urged my colleagues to read this book, but it isn't about the law at all. It offers insights into how we, as humans, think that ought to be required reading for anyone who needs to make intelligent decisions or to understand how others think...and surely that is all of us.
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on October 8, 2015
great read!
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on October 7, 2015
Very interesting book - haven't finished it yet (>1yr!)
Lots of psychological experiments described to illustrate
the concepts.
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on October 1, 2015
Excellent read! A must!
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on September 4, 2015
Excellent book on cognitive psychology and the process of how we think.
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on August 30, 2015
If you are studying psychology or statistics, this book might be informative or mildly interesting. If you think you might be interested in learning more about these subjects, this book will probably not leave you gushing with enthusiasm for them.

The first several chapters seem to describe little more than tricks devised to make generally smart people (e.g., graduate students in mathematics) look stupid. Later on, some context for the reasons behind devising those stupidity-inducing tests (to flesh out phenomenon such as regression to the mean, loss aversion, framing effects, etc.) are presented. Some of these examples are good, many are mediocre, and some are weak.

Perhaps my expectations for this book were too high; I expected more insight from a Nobel Prize winner.
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on August 22, 2015
Good read
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