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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for Teaching Environmentalism
Other reviews state this is depressing or "bangs a kid over the head" too much.

The cold hard facts are that all the trees are being cut down. Pretty soon there will be none! That is depressing! Deal with it! Teaching children about it may help to stop this process! 18 million trees are being cut down a day in the U.S. That is startling. In ten years...
Published on Dec 28 2006 by kindergarten teacher

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Lorax
The Lorax is a political satire about the environment, written in the 60s at a time when America was becoming more aware of pollution. The book is expressing that the world is not going to change unless we do something about it. In the story a villain comes to a place filled with Truffula trees that the Brown Bar-ba-loots eat. The villain starts cutting down the trufflua...
Published on Nov. 13 2002


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for Teaching Environmentalism, Dec 28 2006
Other reviews state this is depressing or "bangs a kid over the head" too much.

The cold hard facts are that all the trees are being cut down. Pretty soon there will be none! That is depressing! Deal with it! Teaching children about it may help to stop this process! 18 million trees are being cut down a day in the U.S. That is startling. In ten years when you can't breathe, you will wish you listened to the Lorax 20 years ago!

My kindergarteners love it! It is all in how you approach it. Teach them to LOVE our earth and it won't be depressing. Excellent book and puppet and concept!!!!!!!!!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow! Why don't I remember this book as a child?, March 3 2012
By 
Renee @ Mother Daughter Book Reviews (Vancouver BC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
This review consists of three parts: 1. My son's review (5 years old), 2. My daughter's review, and 3. My review (the Mom). These are excerpts from the full review. To see the whole thing, please visit us at our website :)

DAUGHTER SAYS:

What I liked and disliked about it: I liked the funny, interesting names like Lorax and Once-ler. I liked the Truffula trees - they look like long stumps with hair. I didn't like that the Once-ler was cutting the trees because the trees were pretty. The end was good because the Once-ler learned his lesson and felt bad about cutting down the trees. I liked how the Once-ler used the word "biggering" to talk about how his Thneed company was growing. I felt sad when all the trees and animals were gone and I hope that with one seed, it can all come back.

I didn't like how the Once-ler was talking to the Lorax. I think I'm getting too old for Dr. Seuss books because the stories are too short; but I still like watching the movies.

My bottom line: I think littler kids like kindergarten kids and maybe kids in Grades 1 and 2 would like this book, but I still liked it.

SON SAYS:

What I liked and disliked about it: I really liked the Thneeds and how he made a whole shop of Thneeds - I really want a Thneed! I would use it as a pillow, or blanket, or a chair, or a couch, or a house, or as a rope to catch someone bad. I like how the Lorax just popped out of the tree stump, but he was bossy and mad. The Truffula trees were funny and cool. It didn't bother me that the trees were getting cut because it was making Thneeds and I liked how the Once-ler's stuff had the words "Once-ler" on it like his wagon and store. The Bar-ba-loots were funny with the way they climbed trees and ate berries. I liked how the city looked like when none of the Truffula trees were cut down. I also liked the telephone that the Once-ler dropped out of his house to talk to the little boy. I could use one of those to talk to my sister. I like the Once-ler's house and how you use ladders to get to another floor. I really like the cover and the drawings of the city.

I didn't like it when the Once-ler said "Shut up!" and when he called him "stupid".

My bottom line: I think every kid in my kindergarten class would LOVE this book. I can't wait to see the movie.

MOM SAYS:

What I liked and disliked about it: I thought I had read every Dr. Seuss book as a child. Well, I must admit that I don't remember reading the Lorax. Perhaps it might have gone right over my head (as may be somewhat evident by my kids' reviews - did my son REALLY say he wanted a Thneed!? Sigh...) I LOVED this book! As I was reading it, all I was thinking is that this is a simple story with such a strong message.

The illustrations of the Truffula trees and all the critters make you fall in love with this fantasy world. These images stand in stark contrast to the grey, drab, stripped-down environment pictured at the beginning and end of the book. The story effectively shows the deterioriation of the environment as the Once-ler gets greedier and greedier (love the use of the term "biggering" to describe his increasing greed). We turn pages to see less and less trees as the story progresses. We witness the migration of the Bar-ba-loots who rely on the berries of the Truffula tree. We are incredulous as the Once-ler turns a blind eye to the Swomee-Swans who cannot breathe with the smog created by the factory. We are saddened when the Humming-Fish must "walk on their fins" as their pond becomes inhabitable. But none of this compares to that final moment when the last Truffula tree is felled and the Lorax takes his leave.

But, thankfully we are not left hanging, Dr. Seuss delivers us hope at the very end. Oh, so well done!! Bravo, Dr. Seuss, bravo.

As mentioned above by my children, the Once-ler's treatment of the Lorax is pretty harsh and some of the language is quite strong. However, compared to the dialogue that occurs in real life between greedy corporations and environmental groups, I find this language quite tame and relatively respectful. Ok, it's quite disrespectful, but the idea is that the Once-ler is the villain so it just makes him that much more so when he's mean to that poor little Lorax.

My bottom line: I was pleasantly surprised by this book, but I'm a bit perplexed by what I should say for a recommendation. The message of the book clearly went over my pro-Thneed son's five-year old head, but my eight year-old daughter felt that the book was a bit too simple for her. I LOVED it. I will recommend this book for 3 to 7 year olds but be prepared to really discuss the message in the book - - otherwise you may find yourself trolling ebay for a "Thneed".
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5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring for a lifetime, March 10 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
When I was in elementary school in the mid-1970s, probably around the age of 7 or 8, all the students in the school were assembled and shown the film of the Lorax. The film was very similar to the film of The Grinch that was made at about the same time and is now a video classic - - wonderful animation and great word-for-word narrative reading of the text. I had been unaware of the book before that. I remember very clearly being very moved and inspired by the tale, and I can trace part of my development as an environmentalist to it. I now work in environmental outreach/education, and every once in a while I get out the book of The Lorax and get re-inspired, especially by the line "UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not." I still find the book very relevant to today. It's not extremist in any way. Even its depiction of the Once-ler is not as an evil man, but someone very recognizable. He doesn't mean harm, but "Business is business, and business must grow." Sound familiar? He doesn't recognize the damage he's causing, or understand just how painful and permanent it will be, until too late. This book reminds all of us to not take our beautiful world for granted, but to take responsibility for it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Lorax, Oct. 31 2002
By 
hehehe (Bay City, MI USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
The book "The Lorax" is another marvelous book of great rhymes, lessons and illustrations by the wonderful Dr. Seuss. In this book, Seuss uses his wonderful ways of telling us how valuable resources are and how pollution can greatly affect a city. In the story, the once-ler comes into town looking to start a new business. As he enters this town, he sees the trees, these wonderful trees, the truffula trees. These soft, silky trees spark an idea. The once-ler then creates a new product and calls it a Thneed. This thneed, as it is called, is a fine-something-that-all-people-need. As the once-ler is chopping down these trees to make this thneed, the Lorax comes up and does what he does best, speaks for the trees. He explains how the chopping of his truffula trees is effecting the environment in a harmful way. The Once-ler doesn't care; he just ignores the Lorax and goes on with his day. He then expands his factory and cuts down more trees. All of a sudden, all of the animals are leaving. The fish because of the water pollution, the swans because of the hazardous waste, and the bar-ba-loots because they have ran out of bar-ba-loot fruits that once grew on the truffula trees. After a while of this business going on, there were no more truffula trees and the Lorax left once and for all. Now, the Once-ler realized what he had done, and now he lives alone in his house on top of his store.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Important Message In A Timeless Tale!, April 6 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
I read this book to my young niece (6 years old) and found that as an adult I enjoyed the presentation of the all-important ecological warning about deforestation and corporate greed as much as she laughed at the funny words. She also easily grasped the eco-message of the delightful rhyming tale. A superb book and well worth reading! While on this subject, I would also like to recommend a new eco-novel, which I came across recently and thoroughly enjoyed. It too presents a most powerful ecological message based on real world facts --- giving much to eco-think about on a global scale --- but with an exciting fairytale-like, nature-loving storyline. There are even some marvelous rhyming heart-warming verses! It's entitled, "ACCUSED BY FACET-EYES" (by C.B. Don) and is presented as a science-fiction. Although it is not a "children's" book, like the famous Lorax, it is the kind of story with a general adult to bright teen/college student "all ages" appeal. After all, even the Lorax must be explained to young kids! There really are not enough such books that present serious environmental issues in an enjoyable lighthearted story format. Must-reads for everyone concerned about our polluted world!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A timeless story for parent and child, Nov. 20 2001
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
Every once in a long while, a children's book like "The Lorax" comes along and clearly teaches adults how our seemingly complex problems are rather easy to predict and solve. With lyrical prose and splashes of color, "The Lorax" artfully reveals how unsustainable economic policies (i.e., unrestrained greed) can potentially destroy a thriving and resilient environment. Mr. Geisel cleverly conceals ecological and conservation theories in phrases that children and adults can easily understand. You and your child will find yourselves finishing this book, and saying, "ahhh, yes, now I understand: you can't take more than what will grow back." This satisfying result is a sign of what all good science should be; that is, understandable to all who read the text and view the images. Despite our advanced technology and previous experiences with environmental degradation, I hope that you and your children will see that many of us are living the life of the Once-ler, either directly in our careers or indirectly as consumers. As the Once-ler discovered, we are not stewards of but rather participants in our declining environments. But Mr. Geisel dampens his dark images and tone to give the small boy, and hopefully our children, a way to turn back the tide of destruction. Your child will see that if the Once-ler can change, then anyone can change for the better. If that last truffula seed can lead to the growth of a new truffula forest and bring back the Lorax and his friends, then perhaps children and parents can assist with the regrowth and expansion of our own rapidly vanishing forests. In other words, perhaps the Lorax exists as a "truffula seed" in each and every one of us.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Lorax - Still Powerful After 30 Years, Nov. 14 2001
By 
T. W. Fuller (Wheeling, IL. USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
Children used to Dr. Seuss' lighthearted, whimsical stories filled with wacky names and places will undoubtedly perceive a vast difference with "The Lorax". It still contains the wacky names, places, and rhymes, so characteristic of Seuss, but with one blatant overtone. This story goes all out to show the devestating consequences of human greed, and what can happen to the environment when humans misuse and take advantage of nature and natural resources.
The story begins when a boy comes to the home of a peculair creature called Once-ler. The boy wants to know about something called the Lorax; "what it was", and "why it was there". After paying the Once-ler a small fee, he narrates the story for the boy. The pictures incorperated into the story are also poignant; for, as we see in the beginning, the small town in which the Once-ler lives is very grey and barren.
However, as the Once-ler begins his story, the pictures become brighter, more cheerful, and colorful, as we see how the town once looked, long, long ago. There were animals, birds, green grass ... and trees!
The Once-ler says, "I came to this glorious place. And I first saw the trees. The Truffula trees". Transfixed by these trees, the Once-ler cuts one down to make a "Thneed". Now, a Thneed is supposed to be a useful thing, which people can find many uses for. Shortly after the first tree is cut down, the Lorax appears. He explains that he talks on behalf of the trees, because the trees cannot talk for themselves. "They have no tongues".
The Lorax is very upset at what the Once-ler has done. But the Once-ler ignores him, and continues to cut down the trees to make Thneeds, until all the trees have been cut down. This action, of cutting down the trees, building a factory to make the thneeds, and releasing waste residue into the water is greatly illustrated in the pictures, showing the cause and effect of polluting the environment.
Eventually the pictures return to the grey, morbid colors we see in the beginning. The Lorax has had to make all the birds, animals and fish leave the town before they die of hunger and starvation, and before they choke to death on all the smog generated by the Once-ler's factory.
As we can clearly see in "The Lorax", Dr. Seuss is making a very defined political statement about how humans have manipulated and destroyed our natural surroundings for their own personal greed. "The Lorax" was written in 1971, in the hayday of environmental activism, and one year after the first Earth Day.
Still, Dr. Suess does not make this story into a gloomy one. He gives us hope. The Once-ler tosses down a seed to the boy; the one last remaining Truffula seed. With this one seed, Dr. Seuss tells us the possiblities are endless, and hope is not lost.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not Seuss' best but still GREAT with an EXCELLENT message!, Oct. 27 2001
By 
R. Riemensnyder (Wilkes-Barre, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
In an imaginary town on the Street of the Lifted Lorax, the main character (a young boy) wanders to the house of the Once-ler to find out about the Lorax. "What was the Lorax?" he asks. After receiving payment, the Once-ler tells the tale of the Lorax to the boy.
While traveling many years ago, the Once-ler came to a place full of Truffula Trees and various creatures. He decided to settle down and start a business. The Once-ler chopped down the trees and made Thneeds, unusual articles of clothing with many uses. After the first tree was chopped down, a strange creature, the Lorax, mysteriously appeared to speak on behalf of the trees that did not want to be chopped down.
The Once-ler ignored the Lorax and expanded his business until not a single tree remained standing. Without trees, no more Thneeds could be made. The business shut down and the Lorax left without a word. However, the Lorax left one item behind - a pile of rocks with the word "Unless" on it. The Once-ler comes to realize the meaning of the message - "unless people change and take care of the Earth, life will not get better." He gives the boy a seed to plant.
With a young audience in mind, Dr. Seuss manages to illustrate the importance of taking action and caring for the environment. The rhythm and unique words keep readers' attention throughout the story. The book empowers children to believe that they can make a difference and improve the quality of life on Earth. What a great message to give younger people!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Is this book Dangerous? A Review of Dr. Seuss's The Lorax, Oct. 11 2001
By 
This review is from: The Lorax (Hardcover)
Dr. Seuss's The Lorax is a fantastic story by one of the most lovable, creative children's books authors ever. In the story, Seuss presents a statement concerning the environment in his own original way. Of course, the book would not be complete without those witty rhymes and colorful illustrations. The Lorax "speaks for the trees" and tries to save the Truffula trees from the greedy Once-ler. The Lorax protects the trees and all the creatures that inhabit them. When the Once-ler comes and desires to cut down the Truffula trees, the Lorax tries to stop him, but he fails. The Once-ler cuts down every last Truffula tree, pollutes the environment, and drives all the creatures, including the Lorax, off the land. The story does end on a positive note, but to learn what it is, you must read the book for yourself.
Because The Lorax was first published in 1971, it is easy to believe that the story is referring directly to the environmental movement of the 1960's. The story clearly illustrates the themes of conservation, love, and respect for the land. The author grabs the reader's attention in the beginning of the story by starting in the future and then narrating the past. The reader sees the death and bareness of the land first and then learns the causes for the current state of the environment. Seuss approaches the subject in a blunt and obvious critique of the methods used to strip resources from the land. This story sends a simple, yet powerful statement about the world in which we live.
Because of the book's strong message concerning the environment (clear-cutting forests in particular,) this children's book has found itself on the Banned Books List. The reason is simple. Several logging companies feel threatened by the book and its message. They are afraid of people reading the book and making the great discovery that clear-cutting is bad for the environment! I believe that if this book has been placed on the Banned Book List, then the goal of the story has been achieved. The entire purpose of this book was not just to make kids laugh but to point out that clear-cutting is a serious problem. We, as humans, are trashing the environment. Sometimes the message is the most effective when it is reduced to its simplest form. In the future, this problem will rest in the hands of our children and educating children will help them make better choices than previous generations have.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Important Dr. Suess Book Ever Written, Jan. 7 2001
By 
RTPierce (New York City) - See all my reviews
The Lorax is undoubtedly the most important book ever written by Theodore Geisel (Dr. Suess) and in my opinion, one of the most profound pieces EVER written, period. I feel so strongly about this book that I have a tattoo of the Lorax on my arm with just one word beneath it - UNLESS. Please, obtain this book either via a library, a friend, or purchase it. It is a sad tale that reflects not only the negative implications of clear cutting forests, but it also reflects modern society's irresponsible use of resources and the trend towards making things bigger and bigger and bigger (e.g. Sports Utility Vehicles, highways, homes, televisions, etc.). This comes at a tremendous expense to the Earth and all it's inhabitants. We are not only killing off species, but we are changing the very nature of the biospere via pollution and degradation of natural resources. UNLESS we change things now, the future of humans and other organisms on Earth is very bleak. All people need to either read or have this book read to them - children, adults, EVERYONE! Teachers and professors, I implore you - read this book to your students, or assign it to them, whether they are five or eighteen or one hundred - even if it happens to be banned where you teach (Pacific Northwest?). UNLESS people like us care a whole awful lot, nothing is ever going to change - it's not!
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The Lorax
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss (Hardcover - Aug. 12 1971)
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