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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Monday you can fall apart. Tuesday, Wednesday break my heart
We've all heard the stories of the skies, for whatever reason, raining frogs on innocent town travelers. This natural occurrence of the wild is one of the great weirdnesses of life. So how much odder is it, really, to consider frogs flying? They have all the self-possession required of such a task. Frogs are a uniquely calm species. Confident even. In Dave Wiesner's...
Published on April 21 2004 by E. R. Bird

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3.0 out of 5 stars Tuesday
very cool book, kind if a weird story, no real meaning of the story. Great story to read if you have a good imagination and like to let it run wild. Not too many words,about a 5 year old reading level.
Published on Dec 11 2001


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Monday you can fall apart. Tuesday, Wednesday break my heart, April 21 2004
By 
E. R. Bird "Ramseelbird" (Manhattan, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
We've all heard the stories of the skies, for whatever reason, raining frogs on innocent town travelers. This natural occurrence of the wild is one of the great weirdnesses of life. So how much odder is it, really, to consider frogs flying? They have all the self-possession required of such a task. Frogs are a uniquely calm species. Confident even. In Dave Wiesner's essentially wordless book "Tuesday", amphibian folk are given the unexplained power of floatation. In his tale, Wiesner considers what exactly frogs would do with the gift of flying if it was granted them.
One of the best pictures in this book is on one of the first pages. There, a turtle cowers into its shell as black eyed pupil-less frogs rise on their lily pads out of the water. The frogs descend, so to speak, on a nearby suburb, and proceed to wreak some minor havok. They disturb a man pausing to eat a late night sandwich. They disturb laundry and enter old ladies' homes to watch a little telly. And they take a great amount of pleasure in scaring a dog that would undoubtedly eat them if it had the chance. As the book ends, the frogs are relieved of their otherworldly powers and hop back to the swamps, leaving only their lily pads behind them. The next Tuesday, at the same time, we're given a hint of how a more porcine animal will handle flight.
Wiesner is a genius at the visual gag. His illustrations are simple watercolors, well-detailed and in-depth. Wiesner knows when to give an animal human expressions and when to leave it looking particularly froggy. He gets every single one of those frogs' spots down , and can manipulate his illustrations in such a way that you never doubt for a moment the ridiculous things you're seeing. To top it all off, the man's a master at conveying light. I'm particularly attached to a scene of flying frogs watching t.v., a wary cat crouching in the background. The old lady asleep in the chair is wearing glasses that are reflecting the light of the television perfectly. On top of that, this is exactly what a room lit only by a single screen looks like. Wiesner's details are marvelous. Make sure to notice the frog appreciatively eyeing the old lady's painting of the forest.
There aren't that many wordless picture books out there these days though Wiesner has made a name for himself by specializing in this area. After reading "Tuesday", you can understand why he deserves this honor. Both witty and perverse, this author/illustrator lets you see into worlds you never could have imagined existed before he came up with them. You'll be thankful that he did.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars tell your own story, Dec 27 2007
By 
Ian J. Miller (Ottawa, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
Although there are very few words included with the wonderful illustrations, I have a pretty standard version of the story which my kids expect to hear whenever we read the book. The illustrations contain so many humourous details that the story can be subtly varied in each telling to help keep the story teller amused.

If you are not sure about making up stories for your kids, this book might provide an excellent template--just describe what you see in the pictures.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wordless, yet eventful Plot, Nov. 8 2003
This review is from: Tuesday (Paperback)
David Wiesner's, almost wordless, book, "Tuesday," gives the reader a vivid story about a group of frogs who take their lily pads for a ride. Their lily pads fly through the air and through the neighborhood. The frogs' adventure ends when the sun begins to rise. However, the next Tuesday, another animal gets to take a similar adventure.

In the book, "Tuesday," David Wiesner uses watercolor on Arches paper for the illustrations. The illustrator uses dark colors to represent the time of night in this story. The dark colors also give the viewer a sense of mystery as they flip through the pages. However, the illustrator also uses light colors to represent the light from a house, the glow from a television set or the time of day. David Wiesner uses line to show the action of the frogs, by guiding the viewers' eye through the frogs' adventure on their lily pads. Wiesner's choice to make the frogs in the book, "Tuesday," makes the frogs seem friendly and happy.
My favorite aspect of the illustration was that color. The light and dark differences found throughout the book made the story seem very real, even though the plot is very, "magical." The use of blues and grays make the frogs flying through the air seem mysterious. While the fluorescent lights of the kitchen give a very drastic change to the frogs flying in the night outside. I also think that it was very cute for the frog to be waving at the man in the kitchen. I think that is a minor detail that a child will most likely pick up on and appreciate.
The lighting of the television room was another favorite for me. I like how the artist let the glow of the television shadow the frogs and the old woman. I enjoyed the fact that the frogs made themselves at home with the remote control and the cat looking on, in the background.
I think this is a book that a child would definitely enjoy to, "read," especially since they do not have to read. The child is free to let their imagination do the storytelling.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An imaginative award-winning journey, July 26 2003
By 
Reginald D. Garrard "the G-man" (Camilla, GA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
I discovered this classic over a decade ago when working on my Master's. One of my required classes was a course in children's literature and it turned out to be my favorite. Having long been an avid reader, I was reintroduced to forgotten pleasures and presented with new (at that time) works that were totally fascinating.
"Tuesday" is in the latter category. It is short on prose but makes up for it with engrossing illustrations. The minimum of words allows the "reader" to create a different script with each visit.
My three-year-old niece "eats" the book up every time that either her mom, her grandfather, or even her dotting uncle takes a shine to pull it off the shelf and share it with her. Our respective interpretations of the pictures are limitless, making this a book that will live long after others have faded into obscurity.
Even the book's end allows the child to ponder the events of "Wednesday" and even hypothesize about the events of subsequent days.
Any book that plays on a child's natural tendency to dream is a winner.
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5.0 out of 5 stars to be read EVERY Tuesday, May 19 2002
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
In the inside of the cover, Wiesner claims these events actually happened one Tuesday and... "all those in doubt are reminded that there is always another Tuesday." Beginning at 8:00pm, we see a three-part picture of a pond that changes perspective to focus on an alarmed turtle. Frogs on lilypads have taken flight and begin to chase after birds, intimidate a dog and confuse a man eating midnight snack. As morning approaches, the frogs return to their pond, leaving their lilypads and the curious detectives behind. The story ends with the words, "next Tuesday" and the shadow of a flying pig.
I've used this book in primary classrooms. It is a very cute story with only a few words. It also provides a wonderful opportunity for children to tell or write their own words. This enables students who cannot read yet to engage in a literate activity.
Why 5 stars?:
This book tells a cute fantasy story with very few words. It lends itself to having children make up their own text, which will support their emerging literacy skills. The illustrations are incredibly lifelike and it is no wonder it won a Caldecott.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tuesday's Countdown: 7:58 p.m., 7:59 p.m., 8:00 p.m. Arise!, April 11 2001
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
Tuesday is the most imaginative picture book that I have ever seen. It is a wordless fantasy of people, animals, and plants that allows you to supply your own story. As such, it will provide endless opportunities for you and your child to entertain one another. What really is going on? What does it mean? What will happen next Tuesday?
The book is illustrated very much like a graphic novel (a series of comic books bound together in softcover form, if you haven't seen one) but without words. The book does have a few indicators of time and day of the week, that provide the minimal connection to reality needed to launch the story into space.
The images here are very whimsical. Frogs fly on lily pads in formation like the Blue Angels, and create lots of unexpected fun. The book is most interesting when you see what happens on the second Tuesday. How about the third? You'll have to use your imagination for that one.
This book deserves its Caldecott Medal for outstanding illustrations. In no other book that I can think of do the illustrations carry the story. The book uses vibrant colors, done in a low-key way. Stylistically, it is a take-off on the science fiction and super hero genres in pictures.
You will be laughing out loud when you see what the frogs are up to. You will also enjoy the visual puns on textless pages.
Where else can pictures tell the story? Have you ever engaged in pantomimes, shadow puppets, or charades with your child? If you haven't, this would be a good time to introduce those enjoyable games.
Imagination can take you anywhere you want!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful Display of Vivid Imagination, Aug. 8 2000
By 
Matthew Ellenberg (Clemson, South Carolina) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
TUESDAY, by David Wiesner
Book Review
Who will be next? Weisner uses no words, which allows readers to develop their own opinions about what exactly is happening. The book is a vivid display of color and detail painted in watercolor. Both children and adults can experience fun and amazement by reading this picture book. As dusk becomes night, something strange happens to animals in this particular town. The story opens and frogs begin to float above their pond, perched upon their lily pads, like genies on flying carpets. As the frogs rise out of the water, they fly in a flock, raiding the town while watchful eyes are asleep. The amphibious creatures fly through linen hanging out to dry and an elderly woman's living room while she is asleep. Then something strange happens to them at dawn. They can no longer soar above and around the town and are reduced to hopping back to their pond without the aid of flight. The following night, another animal is able to fly and see the town in their own new light, once darkness falls.
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4.0 out of 5 stars ellenbebookreviewTuesday, Aug. 8 2000
By 
Matthew Ellenberg (Clemson, South Carolina) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
TUESDAY, by David Wiesner
Book Review
Who will be next? Weisner uses no words, which allows readers to develop their own opinions about what exactly is happening. The book is a vivid display of color and detail painted in watercolor. Both children and adults can experience fun and amazement by reading this picture book. As dusk becomes night, something strange happens to animals in this particular town. The story opens and frogs begin to float above their pond, perched upon their lily pads, like genies on flying carpets. As the frogs rise out of the water, they fly in a flock, raiding the town while watchful eyes are asleep. The amphibious creatures fly through linen hanging out to dry and an elderly woman's living room while she is asleep. Then something strange happens to them at dawn. They can no longer soar above and around the town and are reduced to hopping back to their pond without the aid of flight. The following night, another animal is able to fly and see the town in their own new light, once darkness falls. by Matthew Ellenberg
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5.0 out of 5 stars We all need more flying frogs in our lives., June 11 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
When my dad disappeared into Waldenbooks for nearly half an hour, I went in search. Hunting through his usual haunts (Sci Fi, Sports), I was a bit shocked to find him tucked away next to a rack of rack of Dr. Seuss books. In his hand was an open copy of "Tuesday," in which he was thoroughly engrossed. As I watched, he shut the book and took it over to the cashier. When the man recommended it highly, my dad stammered, "Umm, it looks like something the kids might like." I'm 19; my sister's 16. We out grew picture books quite a few grades ago.

So after weeks of mercilessly teasing Dad about buying a picture book, my sister and I finally snuck a look at the thing. And promptly became fans. The book can be read in less than five minutes, but it *should* be poured over for hours. The illustrations are absolutely beautiful and the story is slyly playful. Get it and read it immediately--even if you have to pretend it's for your kids.

P.S. X-Philes, take note: all the action takes place at 11:21...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Every frog has its day, Jan. 29 2002
By 
Morgan Reynolds (Kalamazoo, MI United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tuesday (Hardcover)
The power of imagination gives the most mundane of animals a flight of fancy. One Tuesday night, just after dusk, a group of frogs find the power of flight and soar over a sleeping town on their lilypads. Their expressive faces will enchant you as they encounter trees, laundry, and people!
This book is AWESOME. It is a simple "flight of the imagination", using maybe 6 words in all, but utilizing beautifully rendered illustrations. The tranquil watercolors show a fuzzy midnight world with an enchanted feel to it. The frogs are so cute, and their faces show hilarious human expression. This is simple, but beautiful!
This book would be best for younger kids to "make believe" to, or for older teens/adults, who can really appreciate the images. It can whisk you away on your own lilypad into the sweetest realms of imagination, into a world where frogs fly!
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Tuesday
Tuesday by David Wiesner (Paperback - Sept. 27 2011)
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