Customer Reviews


46 Reviews
5 star:
 (24)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4.0 out of 5 stars A Good read of Mister Bond
Benson has a good handle on the character, and this is more the literary Bond, we've read from Fleming and Gardner and less the cinematic Bond we've watched in movie theatres.
I felt it was a satisfactory conclusion to the Union and Le Gerant story arc Benson has been crafting in his last few Bond novels. It was also nice to see him not only bring back previously...
Published 18 months ago by Randy F.

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Ian Fleming, but oh well...
This is the first of these pastiches of the old James Bond series that I have read. I will confess that I read Fleming many years ago (I think I was in high school) and enjoyed some of the earlier John Gardner books, frankly, more than I enjoyed Fleming. Later I became annoyed with Gardner somewhat, though he did attempt to paper over some of the sillier scenes in the...
Published on Feb. 9 2004 by David W. Nicholas


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars A Good read of Mister Bond, Jan. 12 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Benson has a good handle on the character, and this is more the literary Bond, we've read from Fleming and Gardner and less the cinematic Bond we've watched in movie theatres.
I felt it was a satisfactory conclusion to the Union and Le Gerant story arc Benson has been crafting in his last few Bond novels. It was also nice to see him not only bring back previously established Bond universe characters like Draco and Mathis, but to not play it safe and really take some chances in his portrayals of them.
His next Bond novel The Man With the Red Tattoo, which I'll also pickup the Kindle edition of, is nicely set up in here as we'll if you pick up on the leads.
Not Benson's best Bond novel, but well worth a read, for fans of the character, but make sure you've read the previous novels first, especially the Union arc The Facts of Death, High Time To Kill, and Doubleshot.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Courageous and thrilling!, March 9 2004
By A Customer
I think Benson did a courageous job with this book. Some people criticized him for what he did with the characters of Marc-Ange Draco and Mathis. I say that the Bond Universe was his to make use of, JUST AS IN ANY FRANCHISE. What he did with Draco was dramatic and surprising. This is one of Benson's BEST Bond novels.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Not Ian Fleming, but oh well..., Feb. 9 2004
By 
David W. Nicholas (Van Nuys, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the first of these pastiches of the old James Bond series that I have read. I will confess that I read Fleming many years ago (I think I was in high school) and enjoyed some of the earlier John Gardner books, frankly, more than I enjoyed Fleming. Later I became annoyed with Gardner somewhat, though he did attempt to paper over some of the sillier scenes in the later movies filmed while he was doing the writing. Raymond Benson is the latest contestant in the continuing saga of someone trying to write a book continuing a character that someone else created.
Benson's writing is only mediocre, but of course the plot is what's important. All of the typical elements of a James Bond novel are here: a criminal mastermind who's trying to do horrible things, a weaker sidekick who's been maneuvered into cooperating, a beautiful woman caught up in things who's unsuspecting, and of course exotic locales and sophisticated entertainments like fancy restaurants and gambling in Monte Carlo.
Benson handles all of this reasonably well, though as I said the writing's only so-so. I enjoyed the book reasonably well, and would recommend it to someone looking for mindless beach entertainment or something to read on a plane while travelling somewhere.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars Never again, Oct. 16 2003
By 
N. P. Stathoulopoulos "nick9155" (Brooklyn, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
After enjoying James Bond novels for the guilty pleasures they are, I finally have to put them to rest with Benson's latest 'novel'. I may pick up a Bond book one day, but it will not be a Benson.
Ian Fleming's novels are finally back in print in the USA, and I would encourage everyone reviewing here to pick them up and read them all. Fleming was very good at what he did. Bond was a perfect character to go to the movies, and he has endured as a character well past the Cold War.
Bond was resurrected for the page in the early 80s by spy novelist John Gardner, who churned out no less than 13 Bond novels in about 15 years. Some were good, some were awful. It became clear that Gardner was not very interested in the legacy or the character of Bond. His books seemed to be about a guy named Bond who was a secret agent.
Raymond Benson, super James Bond fan and indeed president of a fan club, was given the mantle to write these books. Not a novelist, Benson did good research and came up with good stories to work Bond and UK interests in.
Unfortunately, he is a bad writer. A non-writer. His books alternate between long descriptions of everything Benson learned on his fact-finding missions to the locales featured in the novel, and then he cuts over to action, bad dialogue, more description, and even went so far as to include some nauseating and embarrassing sex scenes. He cannot write a novel where all of these elements blend into a solid story with sharp plotting and clear characters.
Benson is obsessed with Fleming's Bond. However, he is not obsessed with attempting to write prose that even approaches John Gardner, let alone Fleming. The results are incredibly disappointing and downright silly at times. I don't know how well these have been selling, but it seems like the literary franchise of Bond has been destroyed. While each new Bond films takes in more than the last, Bond books just keep getting more upsetting.
I couldn't even finish this book. After resurrecting characters Fleming created and killed, Benson's plotting is very shoddy, skipping out on Bond for whole sections. The lack of anything approaching engaging prose made me put this, and Benson, down for good.
I gave him a chance. I endured most of 'the Union' trilogy, which is a sad attempt to resurrect SPECTRE. It doesn't have to be this bad. Glidrose needs a pro writer who can up the stock of Bond books.
Not recommended. Go and hunt down Fleming, who must be spinning several times in his grave.
Goodbye, Mr. Benson.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars The NERVE!!!, July 24 2003
By A Customer
OK, maybe that was a bit strong. But I'm a novelist too, and I personally would hate my characters being mucked about with after I was dead. Mathis and Marc-Ange Draco weren't his characters to begin with, and now he's made it so that if anyone else ever writes Bond novels, they cannot be used (unless Mathis became a pity figure, which would be horrible and not at all useful to the writer or fun to the reader). Benson's crime group and its leader are poor retreads of Blofeld and SPECTRE, too. All I see in this book is a writer cobbling together Fleming's old ideas to make money.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars NOBODY DOES IT BETTER, June 21 2003
By 
Ron Fortier "Air Chief" (Fort Collins, Colorado) - See all my reviews
Raymond Benson loves James Bond. That has been true in every one of the books he has done to date. NEVER DREAM OF DYING is no exception and the characters, both old and new, are pure Ian Fleming. Let's hope Mr.Benson's license to thrill is renewed again and again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Benson's best, June 17 2003
By A Customer
In this new Bond adventure, Bond partners up with French Agent (I'm not sure) Mathis to take down the Union once and for all, an organization who stops at nothing just to make trouble, by taking down their blind, but dangerous boss, Le Gerant. This book, as I would say, is the sequel to Benson's books High Time To Kill and Doubleshot, and he's successfully ended this trilogy. From beginning to end, I couldn't stop reading this book. Benson may not write like Fleming or Gardner, but he writes an even better Bond. His books have more action and suspense. Although, this may be a little disappointing for Bond fans since the story is not as classic like Goldfinger and Dr. No, but anyone who likes something with action, love, and is in need for a book this summer should be looking into this book before they skip this. Overall, it's Benson at his best.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Blast(s) from the past, July 6 2002
This review is from: Never Dream Of Dying (Hardcover)
Benson brings back a couple of classic Fleming characters in this novel, his 5th effort at a full length Bond book. They way they are used is controversial, and for some, likely disappointing. (I was) But the book on the whole is a page-turning thriller.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful end to the series., June 25 2002
This is a outstanding read. A great way to end the Union series. In the final chapter of the Union series, Bond comes face to face with the mastermind of the Union.
If you're a James Bond fan, then you have to start the series. The first one is High Time To Kill, Doubleshot, then Never Dream of Dying.
This series starts off with a raid that goes bad...horrible bad. After this happens, Bond vows to take them down no matter what the cost. I can't say to much about the plot, but I will say this...someone from Bond's past comes back...and this was a shocker. By the end of the book, Bond comes up aganist the mastermind of the Union...a blind man who has unusual sight.
Benson has a strong style of writing. It's obvious he has a stonge knowledge of the Bond character and what makes him tick. If you start the series, you won't be sorry.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The most Fleming-esque of the post-Fleming Bonds, June 9 2002
By 
R. L. MILLER (FT LAUDERDALE FL USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
007 again faces The Union with its enigmatic boss Le Gerant, only now we're close enough to know that he's a blind man who doesn't need a cane to move around--he can sense where he is and what's around him. We've learned in earlier books that The Union is a descendent of the old Union Corse from the "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" days. Plus, the Union Corse's old boss--Marc Ange Draco--is still alive. Another thing Marc Ange was--for a few hours he was Bond's father in law by virtue of Bond's all too brief marriage to his daughter Teresa "Tracy" DiVienzo. The post-Fleming Bonds have all suffered from a time warp paradox--Fleming's Bond was a British naval veteran of World War II, which would make him about 75 by "real time". Previous books by both New Bond authors have almost ignored events of the Fleming epoch as a way of dodging that paradox. But one point of amusement in this book is the way Bond has bought the auctioned-off "Goldfinger" car--only to wish it still had all the cool gadgets it did when it was still in Q's charge.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Never Dream Of Dying
Never Dream Of Dying by Raymond Benson (Hardcover - May 8 2002)
Used & New from: CDN$ 0.06
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews