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5.0 out of 5 stars Don't Use a Cell Phone if You are an Evil Dooer Lucas Wants
Lucas Davenport is the luckiest crime fighter in the World. He has survived 14 Prey novels by John Sanford (John Camp). (Naked Prey is is latest, reviewed elsewhere). Lucas gets invited to St. Louis for a few days by the FBI. Luckily, Minnesota doesn't need him. He is getting married, but Weather doesn't want him around Minneapolis, and neither do the politicians. Off he...
Published on May 10 2003 by Ray M. Bayles

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The 'man-hunt' for Clara Rinker
Clara Rinker was the female assassin Lucas Davenport met in an earlier book, Certain Prey. She managed to escape both him and the FBI, and have been hiding in Mexico. Something terrible happens down there, and Clara is forced to go back to the States to seek revenge. While Clara gets aquainted with old friends and foes, Davenport and the FBI figures out, that because of...
Published on June 20 2004 by Louise


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3.0 out of 5 stars The 'man-hunt' for Clara Rinker, June 20 2004
By 
Louise (Copenhagen V, Denmark) - See all my reviews
Clara Rinker was the female assassin Lucas Davenport met in an earlier book, Certain Prey. She managed to escape both him and the FBI, and have been hiding in Mexico. Something terrible happens down there, and Clara is forced to go back to the States to seek revenge. While Clara gets aquainted with old friends and foes, Davenport and the FBI figures out, that because of the incidents in Mexico, they should begin looking for Clara in the States again. Soon dead bodies start to turn up, and there is no doubt in Davenport's mind that it is Clara's work. But neither he nor the FBI can find her. Lucas is helping out the feds, but it is not before he starts investigating on his own, with the help from a couple of retired cops, that he starts to find the rigth track. Question is, will Clara succeed in escaping this time as well?
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4.0 out of 5 stars Pull up a Comfortable Davenport, March 7 2004
By 
tertius3 (MI United States) - See all my reviews
Looking through the 'scope, this novel features exotic locales for Lucas Davenport, well outside his usual Twin Cities ambit, and a new treat for the reader. Perhaps these varied settings presage a wider field of action as Davenport moves to a new, state job in the next novel. Viewed from the other end, I didn't find the excessive personal tensions and psycho-logical horror that he often encounters in his earlier cases. Although numerous changes are impending in his life, they play little role here. This is a stroll for Lucas, who leads all the work, and contributes all the leads, at a comfortable yet rapid pace. A nice vacation from fear for the reader, too, since the killer's hits are on people you won't particularly like. Incidentally, this could be a good book for retirees, who would be proud of the retired St. Lou gum-shoes who do good work (ALL the work, one might say, since the FBI seems only good for looking up 'phone numbers :).
Davenport's quarry is once again the memorably endearing professional of CERTAIN PREY, Clara Rinker, coming back into Lucas' conflicted life. Clara is ingenious and constantly surprising, ruthlessly efficient and creative. She is as confident as ever and bent on multiple revenges, less enigmatic in aims than Sandford's usual psychos but as devious in means as ever. Stalking her ends up much deeper than you initially suspect. I found very little was extraneous to the plot, despite a high page count. Numerous characters come and go, some stereotyped for the plot, but each each well and contrastively characterized. There are two developments in Davenport's slowly progressing family life. Lucas shows he is one in a long line of sentimental detectives in literature, but very close to the top.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Prey that Carla Rinker doesn't come looking for you!, March 4 2004
By 
Christian Dorr "cdorr_1977" (Davenport, IA United States) - See all my reviews
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Mortal Prey is the story of Clara Rinker and her search for revenge for the killing of her baby and her future husband. Rinker knows who probably hired the hit on her so she heads for them immediately. Along the way we get to see more of what Rinker has done in her past and almost feel sympathy for her.
Davenport is called in by the FBI to help track Rinker down because he's the only one thats survived dealing with her (I've not read Certain Prey yet) in the past. In addition to tracking down Rinker, Davenport is burdened with building a new house, getting ready for a wedding and a new baby.
The setting for this book is mostly in St. Louis but some parts take place elsewhere. Characters from past books also show up in this book.
I found this book to be less dark than some of the other four books in the Prey series that I've read. Reading the other books in the Prey series are not necessary to enjoy this book, but they would help in understanding who Davenport is and how he does what he does.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Sandford delivers consistently in the Prey series., Jan. 11 2004
By 
Sheri in Reho (Rehoboth Beach, DE) - See all my reviews
I have now read 6 or 8 of the novels in the Prey series and I have to give it to John Sandford for consistently delivering satisfying and entertaining novels. This one, in fact, has one of the more satisfying endings of any novel in recent memory (anti-climactic perhaps, but nonetheless satisfying).
Whereas most of the Prey series takes place in or near Minneapolis, Lucas Davenport's home base, and includes a predictable cast of characters (Weather, Marcy, Del, Anne Marie), this novel takes place mostly in and around St. Louis, where Lucas takes the FBI's offer to help track down the notorious contract killer, Clara Rinker. Most of the usual characters play a very lowkey role in this book but that's okay, because there is a new and interesting cast to supplant them.
Deep within himself, Lucas respects how flawlessly Clara is able to pull off her jobs and still evade the authorities. Like many of the law enforcement officials he works with on the case, he really wants to bring down Clara Rinker. Unlike most of his colleagues, he sees her humanity. He knows where she comes from...what kind of haunted life...and he can't help but feel sorry for the kind of childhood that led her to this.
This is a little different side of Lucas...more introspective...less of the ladie's man and the joker. I really liked it...it was a nice change of pace.
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2.0 out of 5 stars a literary cramp, Sept. 7 2003
By 
Daniel J. Connelly "djconnel" (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
"The pain pushed through the sleep like an arrow, and he rose to the surface and tried to tried to stretch his right leg, but the cramp held on and got deeper, and Lucas groaned, "Man, man, man-o-man-o-man," and tried to knead it out, but the cramp held on for fifteen seconds, twenty, then began to slacken.
Thus chapter 12 opens with perhaps the most convoluted, ill-formed run-on sentence I've ever read in published literature. This is just the most egregious example. Elsewhere, action scenes are described unclearly, often requiring rereading to clarify the flow.
So on the local scale, the book falls short. Clearly it lacks the level of editing and revision expected from a professional work. But on the global scale, it also fails. The book has the feel of being written on a page budget, the plot development dictated by the page number rather than by events and circumstances. After clumsy middle-chapter plodding, things are wrapped up with remarkable efficiency as the magic number of 400 is approached.
The problem here is that Sandford, like so many best-selling authors, has gone to writing two books per year instead of the still-challenging one. Compromises must be made, quality must suffer, but profit justifies all. "Mortal Prey" rings with but an echo of the magic of such classics as "Winter Prey". It's not a total loss -- the echo, at least, is still there. But why settle?
Unfortunately for me, this is the second consecuting Prey book which has missed the target, after "Easy Prey". So I am afraid I must now move on. My strong recommendation -- start with Rules of Prey and go through the series. The early books shine where these late works fail. Don't fall "prey" to the "best seller" syndrome.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Rinker (hitwoman) redux, June 12 2003
By 
David W. Nicholas (Van Nuys, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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John Sandford's Prey series has a strong following now, and this isn't the book (despite the blurb inside the cover) to start the series with. But if you're already into the series, this is a very good novel with a number of plot twists and interesting characters.
The action starts in Mexico, where Clara Rinker (the escaped killer in Certain Prey) is almost killed by an assassin, who escapes only to be killed by an accomplice. You're never certain why she was shot at, or who prompted it, but she seems fairly certain that it was prompted by old acquaintances from her days in St. Louis, MO, and so she returns to try and track them down. When it becomes apparent what's going on, the FBI calls on Lucas Davenport to help find her.
The plot goes from there, and I won't tell you anything more. Suffice to say, the action is pretty evenly paced, throughout, and enough happens to keep you interested for the length of the novel. This is a very good book, worth the time you're going to spend on it, unless you've not read the previous one that involves the lady killer. If that's the case, you should read that one first.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not the best in the series, May 17 2003
This review is from: Mortal Prey (Hardcover)
In the thirteenth Prey book featuring Lucas Davenport, John Sandford continues to deliver one of the most consistently good series in suspense fiction. While not the best in the bunch, it is still good enough to satisfy any Sandford fan.
A follow-up novel to Certain Prey - a couple books back in the series - Mortal Prey has the return of top-notch assassin Clara Rinker. She escaped at the end of Certain Prey, but when her lover is killed and she sustains a wound that kills her unborn baby, Clara is drawn out of hiding to avenge the murders. Lucas, hearing that Clara is back in the U.S., is called in to assist in her detention.
Clara is a challenging contrast to the normal serial killers that Lucas contends with, principally because she is not truly insane and is not driven by some psychosis that forces her to kill. Instead, she is coldly calculating and not likely to make the errors in judgment that often do in other Davenport adversaries.
There are no real flaws in this book except that Lucas himself is a little less interesting than usual. The Prey books are at their best when he is at his edgiest, and he is a bit tamer in this novel. Nonetheless, this is a good book and even a person new to the series should catch on pretty quickly and enjoy the ride.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Don't Use a Cell Phone if You are an Evil Dooer Lucas Wants, May 10 2003
By 
Ray M. Bayles (Tumacacori, Arizona) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Mortal Prey (Hardcover)
Lucas Davenport is the luckiest crime fighter in the World. He has survived 14 Prey novels by John Sanford (John Camp). (Naked Prey is is latest, reviewed elsewhere). Lucas gets invited to St. Louis for a few days by the FBI. Luckily, Minnesota doesn't need him. He is getting married, but Weather doesn't want him around Minneapolis, and neither do the politicians. Off he goes to search for the deadly Clara Rinker. You rember Clara? She is the best hit-woman in the business who tried to kill Lucas a couple of books ago. We wonder: Will Rinker go after Weather? Lucas' pregnant girlfriend? We hope not because she has been a target in four other books already and that plot line is getting old. Maybe Lucas will still have the luck to instantly make friends with police he doesn't know so they can give him the help he needs in a strange city. Maybe his luck will help him circumvent the reluctant, bureaucratic FBI guys and gals so he can work without restrictions in total freedom, even if lots of people are dying. He must quickly track Rinker down in a city she knows well and Lucas doesn't. She has friends to help her, and places to hide. Lucas has to make some friends and get his luck going for him, or Rinker is going to keep on keeping on killing people as she seeks revenge.
Clara Rinker shot Lucas in the throat once before. She got away because she has some luck, too. Lucas got well. We admire Lucas. We like Rinker. She is a soft spoken, beautiful, brilliant killer with reasons why she is to be feared. Since we knew her last, Clara has fallen in love, and became pregnant by the son of a Mexican drug lord. She has retired and is a threat to nobody because she is living at home south of the border with the Mejias. Being a housewife isn't so bad.
Things change. Somebody shoots her bad and ticks her off. Was the boyfriend the target? Or was she? She isn't going to forget this.
The FBI drafts Lucas to come help find Clara because they hear she has come back into the country, mad as hell. Lucas can trapse around the country solving crimes while still on the Minneapolis payroll. Luckily, the hunt will only take a few days. The fact that his old FBI girlfriend Malone is going to be there won't bother the pregnant Weather because she has an Episcopalian wedding to plan and a house to finish.
Lucas should be able to clean up this case in two or three days, but what if Rinker is as unpredictable as ever. Or as dangerous? Maybe she has more help than Lucas has? The one with the most luck or help wins. We hope nobody gets killed
This is a fun plot, a page-turner if you don't think too much about whether it makes sense. Sandford offers his usual crisp, clear, adventure writing with good characterizations. Maybe we don't know who all the bad guys are, or how the story will end. Rinker knows how to disappear. Lucas knows how outsmart people and track them down. I liked the evil dooers better than the cops in this one. Too much unfair use of cell phone technology and police arrogance.
Sandford is a skilled writer (a Pulitzer Prize winner in his other life) so even 14 books don't yet get too tiring or predictable. This is a fine summer read that will hit the top of the charts.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Return of Rinker, March 25 2003
This review is from: Mortal Prey (Hardcover)
Yes, when you know this story is centered around the return
of Clara Rinker, you have to read it. And the rewards are
great, because Rinker is a multi-dimentional, complex character,
and the most interesting villain in a long time.
She has appeared before in the "Prey" series and managed to
stay ahead of law enforcement at all times, and she has
settled in Mexico now, and she has a wonderful love interest,
and they are planning on marriage and a family. Then her
lover is gunned down in the town square, literally on top of
Clara, and no one locally can figure out who would want the
guy dead. But, then, no one there has any idea of the true
identify of Clara Rinker, and she is the only one who knows
that is was she, not the guy, who was the target. She is about
out of her mind with fury and grief, and she quickly decides
to go after whoever might have been responsible for her loss.
She is so dedicated to getting even, she doesn't even worry
about which of several possible enemies might have been responsible; she just decides to kill all of them!
So she returns to the American mid-west, and events then
propel the series hero, Lucas Davenport, a cop in Minneapolis,
to start looking for her again.
That their paths will cross is certain, and the outcome is
not quite forseeable. Each is the best of what they do, and
they are both determined to finish the job they started.
And that means more clashes and confrontations.
This is a first-class story, with a lot of interest, a fascinating plot, multi-dimentional characters, and this is a
difficult book to put down.
A lot of pleasure in this one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Let the bodies pile up, Feb. 21 2003
This review is from: Mortal Prey (Hardcover)
Clara Rinker, hit woman extraordinaire, gets hit herself and her lover Paulo is killed. She looses her baby, but gains in fury to go after her employers in St. Louis whom she blames for trying to assassinate her. So she schemes to eliminate them, one after the other.
Enter stage left: Lucas Davenport, Minneapolis `deputy Police Chief and now working for the FBI. Helping him are Mallard and Malone of the FBI and an old pal of his, Andreno, a retired cop.
Let the killings begin. The first victim is Nanny Dichter, serving as a warning to the others - Paul Dallaglio, Andy Levy and John Ross. The killings are innovative and elegant. So much so, that Davenport increasingly admires Rinker. But the chase is on, and Rinker manages to escape every time by the fraction of a minute.
The author not only has a vivid imagination, but knows how to put it on paper to keep you spellbound. Truly a great mystery. And I will not hold it against a lazy editor who brings a telephone conversation on page 147 and then repeats it verbatim, though under different circumstances, on page 158.
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Mortal Prey
Mortal Prey by John Sandford (Hardcover - May 3 2002)
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