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5.0 out of 5 stars White Death
As always Cussler has brought to life someone everyone would like to be. Top grade!
Published on July 10 2003

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Reads like Austin Powers trying to be serious
When the Eskimo villain captured our hero, Kurt Austin (or is it Austin Powers?), I expected him to say, "Welcome to my evil lair." He even had his own form of ill tempered sea bass! I'm sorry, but this thing read like a farce. Dog sleds in downtown DC? Mutant fish that may take over the world? Give me a break. Furthermore, the book was just plain boring...
Published on July 8 2004 by Paul Skinner


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Reads like Austin Powers trying to be serious, July 8 2004
By 
Paul Skinner (Manassas, Virginia United States) - See all my reviews
When the Eskimo villain captured our hero, Kurt Austin (or is it Austin Powers?), I expected him to say, "Welcome to my evil lair." He even had his own form of ill tempered sea bass! I'm sorry, but this thing read like a farce. Dog sleds in downtown DC? Mutant fish that may take over the world? Give me a break. Furthermore, the book was just plain boring. The action was only compelling in a few sections (unlike most of Cussler's books).
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3.0 out of 5 stars Oh! Where is Dirk Pitt, June 10 2004
By 
Jason Webster "An Argonaut" (CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I started reading Dirk Pitt novels back in High School (over 25 years ago!) and over the years I could not wait for the next installment. The most recent Pitt Novels I have found wanting, or maybe it was too much of a good thing? This new series with an associate author(Paul Kemprecos)just does not work for me. I know Pitt was a comic book chacter but some how Cussler was able to make him real to me. His wild exploits always seemed possible. In this new series, with Kurt Austin acting as the new Pitt, it just seems unnatural. As I read I find myself questioning Austins heroics, the character seems hollow. Maybe its me? maybe I'm getting old. Or maybe Dirk Pitt was something special, but his time has run out? To be honest this book does have some entertainment value, and would probably be fun reading for 12 to 16 year old boys, but it does not have the magic of the early Dirk Pitt novels.
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2.0 out of 5 stars If you've read others by Cussler, don't bother with this one, July 3 2004
By 
S. Lyons (Sugar Hill, GA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you've ever read a Clive Cussler book, don't waste your money on this one, it is the same old story. In this book, an evil corporation is threatening to take over the seas and destroy the environment. Kurt Austin is called in to save the day -- are you asleep yet?
I give this book two stars because it is ok if it is your first Cussler book. I've read several of his books however, and this one was a waste of time for me. The ending is pretty corny as well. I don't think I'll bother with any more Cussler books for awhile.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Confirmed, July 1 2004
By 
Alexander E. Paulsen "AlexP" (Jacksonville, Fl United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have been reading Dirk Pitt novels since the beginning. I even relate myself a little with Pitt having had a not dissimilar background and interestes, not to mention green eyes. In short I have been a loyal Cussler reader for as many years as Clive has been writing.
That being said......
I theorized in an earlier review that Cussler has developed an ingenious computer program to write his novels for him. I think there is a database of descriptive metaphors, names and evil plots with another database of georgraphy and history.
This program randonly selects items from the database and inserts them into a pre-written structure that follows the "NUMA" formula.
Let the CPU's churn for a few trillion cycles and Bammo a new book all ready for the publisher.
After reading White Death I am more convinced them ever that I am right on the mark.
This book is exactly like I described. A pat formula, change a few names, reuse some metaphors, grab a few odd historical details sprinkle in soem geographical descriptions and you have a novel that is basically like every other that Clive and Paul have co-written ( or co-programmed ).
I could not get enthusiastic about this book since through the whole thing I felt that I had read it before. You know what I mean, you read a book then years later forgot you read it, re-read it and through the whole thing you say to yourself that I have seen this before. I know what will happen next.
Well thats White Death. I've read it before and knew what would happen in each page.
I have no problem with a formula especially a good one like Dirk and Al and the Admiral and Rudi and Loren. This is a bit abusive and way too repetitive of his other novels.
The good thing is that you can save a lot of money. Buy this book and read it. Put it up, then when the next one comes out just re-read this one. It saves the price of the next novel.
I think Clive and Paul need to dump the database and get some new descriptions and ideas. After all how many evil corporations can there be inthe world all run by meglomaniacs wanting to <fill in the blanks> __________ and __________, then _________ so Dirk/Kurt will ________ and well you get the idea.
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1.0 out of 5 stars My Lost Innocence, June 29 2004
By 
This review is from: White Death (Hardcover)
Others can provide spoilers for this story. I'll just disabuse the reader.
You think you learned some tidbits of history, culture and geography from Dirk Pitt, don't you? This book makes anything you think you learned questionable, at best. The authors have ignored simple geography, played havoc with population distributions, and butchered cultures and their inter-relationships. Don't bet anything on accuracy...especially don't try taking a firearm of any type through Canadian customs thinking it will be easy and/or smooth. It WAS fun to read but the agony of error made me cringe at every turn of the page. The only thing truly needed to make this a decent book was an editor with a large blue pencil and a sense of humor.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Horible, June 27 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: White Death (Hardcover)
for clive cussler, i expect much more than this. i must admitt, though, that i am a fan of Dirk Pitt and dislike this Cussler character, Kurt Austin
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4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining gap between Dirk novels, June 24 2004
By 
Beamer (Duke University) - See all my reviews
Yes, that is Clive Cussler's name in enormous letters, but one needs to merely read one page to know he isn't the author of this book (of course, we all know that already).
Paul Kemprecos is an adept author, but lacks the flair and word flow Cussler has. As a result his book feels a bit stiffer, yet is still worth reading to someone familiar with Cussler's work.
All the pieces of the Cussler world are there. Links to past worlds, history coming alive in modern times, events happening a small amount in the future to allow for more powerful technology, death-defying stunts that are over the top yet not nauseously so, a smart-alec sidekick - you'll find it all. To some people this is all too much of a formula to enjoy, but if you're sitting on a beach, boat or inflatable raft, well, this is the perfect way to read without thinking.
If you enjoyed James Bond or, more accurately Indiana Jones then you'll enjoy this novel. It isn't the best in the Cussler world, though it's likely the best Kurt Austin book to date.
Worth reading, just take it all with a grain of salt. Or a salt-lick, whichever you need.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Still good - but losing its luster, June 23 2004
By A Customer
I've always enjoyed Cussler's books, and have always felt that they maintained their enjoyability - despite many people saying that Cussler had lost his luster. I now agree that there is some improvement needed in order to get his books back to what they were. Trojan Odyssey was just plain awful. This book is better, but was somewhat stale. The authors seemed to reach for plot points, and the characters seemed a little too stereotypical. Dirk Pitt was always great at getting out of a squeeze. It is just assumed that Austin will get out of a squeeze, leaving no tension whatsoever. Unlike Pitt, Austin's solutions are not inventive. It was Pitt's inventiveness that made a predictable result exciting. Despite being a relatively new character, Austin seems to have surpassed Pitt in his abilities. I would like to have seen his hero status take a little more time to develop.
The book is still worth the read, but I have to wonder where this franchise is going.
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4.0 out of 5 stars White Dearth, June 3 2004
By 
L. Hobson (Palmdale California) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Clive Cussler brings together the explosive action of the ocean and a sunken ship, are there people still alive down there or have they seen the last sunset. The Sentinels a group of environmentalist crash into the Danish warship and send it to the bottom. A rescue is under way which leads to a corporation called Oceanus, does this corporation go deeper than the deep blue sea. What type of evil hides it head behind a simple fish farm operation and what will Austin discover. He soon finds out that there are more than fish in the fish farm and more evil in the name Oceanus. His life is soon on the line as he finds his recon soon leads himself to a show down with the guards that protect the fish? Austin soon finds out this corporation goes much deep than the depths of the sea. What type of fish are they growing in this fish farm and what are their plans with such fish. A must read- Larry Hobson Author- The Day Of The Rose
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as a Pitt novel, but still great, May 27 2004
This review is from: White Death (Hardcover)
"White Death" is another of the NUMA franchise books - stories written by Cussler and Paul Kamprecos which star characters from the "National Underwater & Marine Agency". NUMA was originally created to showcase Cussler's hero, the deep-diving, globe-hopping and mystery-solving Dirk Pitt, but grew to include a stable of characters who carry the show in these newer books. Though the story follows the formula of just about every Dirk Pitt novel, Pitt never makes an appearance in this one. In "White Death", NUMA hero Kurt Austin runs afoul of Oceanus - a vast corporate hydra that markets genetically modified fish across the globe. In true Cussler tradition, the initial confrontation is perfectly accidental - Austin volunteers to save the crew of Danish warship accidentally sunk by a ship belonging to a fringe group of whale-huggers. Too late, Austin learns that the Whale-huggers - led by an opportunist named Marcus Ryan - were set-up by Oceanus to distract the world from a nearby fish-processing plant. Sneaking into the unusually secure commercial fishery owned by the company on the remote Faroes Islands, Austin finds clues to a darker secret than Albacore. On the other side of the Atlantic, Paul and Gamay Trout - married NUMA marine biologists - investigate the waters near an Oceanus fishery in North America. For those who live nearby but don't work for Oceanus, times are tough. Not that there isn't any fishing, only that there's something in the water that has replaced the normal catch, and it demands a really bigger boat...
Connecting the dots on each side, Austin and team link Oceanus with a mysterious and legendarily violent tribe of outcast Inuit known as the Kiolya. Led by a figure known as "Toonook", the Kiolya and Oceanus are poised to unleash a horrifying genetically engineered eco-weapon of mass destruction that will give them a stranglehold on the oceans of the world. On their side, Austin falls back on a wealthy but mysterious Spaniard - a Basque who traces his roots to a 15th century explorer persecuted by the Inquisition. But will they be enough to stop Oceanus?
This is only my second "Kurt Austin/NUMA novel - the first being "Serpent". It's still not up to the quality of the Pitt novels, but "White Death" is still quite good. If it holds few surprises, it's a fast read, and the characters seem to come alive much better than they did in the other book. Best of all are the villains - Toonook and the viscious Kiolya are utterly evil, but so formidible that you know they won't go easily. Kamprecos/Cussler gather the respective forces together for a slam-bang finish that gives you faith in the future of the NUMA novels.
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White Death
White Death by Clive Cussler (Hardcover - June 16 2003)
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