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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good!
One of Robin cook's best book, it's a medical thriller like almost of his books.
there are a lot of action and suspense.
The story is exciting, you never get bored.
It's sometimes boring because Jack Stapleton is .
The story: one day one "patient" of Jack has the pest and then three others strange disease appeared. Jack investigates in the Manhattan...
Published on July 25 2003 by H. Georges

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly Good Despite Slow Points
When I was first told about this book by my school's librarian, it didn't sound like something that I would really like. However, I had to read a book so I began Contagion.
The book was a bit difficult to comprehend at times because there are a lot of very technical, medical terms used throughout the entire book. I definitely would not recommend this book to...
Published on Dec 7 2001 by Brennan


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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good!, July 25 2003
By 
H. Georges (montréal, canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Contagion (Mass Market Paperback)
One of Robin cook's best book, it's a medical thriller like almost of his books.
there are a lot of action and suspense.
The story is exciting, you never get bored.
It's sometimes boring because Jack Stapleton is .
The story: one day one "patient" of Jack has the pest and then three others strange disease appeared. Jack investigates in the Manhattan General hospital. There they don't like him and try to kill him.
Jack wants the truth so he continue to investigate.
If you want to know more read the book!
sometimes, the medical jargon in Robin Cook's novel does not make it difficult reading. Most of the medical terminology is explained sufficiently for the reader to understand the significance of the medical find.
This is the first time we hear of Jack Stapleton and Laurie Montgomery. We hear of them again in Chromosome 6 and Vector. Robin tells you in more detail about Jack and Laurie then now the latter on. There is the plane crash that takes the life of Jack's family and how he leaves being a eye doctor to be a legist Doctor.
I Highly recommended it!
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5.0 out of 5 stars contagion, July 24 2003
By 
H. Georges (montréal, canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Contagion (Mass Market Paperback)
One of Robin cook's best book, it's a medical thriller like almost of his books.
there are a lot of action and suspense.
The story is exciting, you never get bored.
It's sometimes disgusting because Jack Stapleton is a legist doctor.
The story: one day one "patient" of Jack has the pest and then three others strange disease appeared. Jack investigates in the Manhattan General hospital. There they don't like him and try to kill him.
Jack wants the truth so he continue to investigate.
If you want to know more read the book!
sometimes, the medical jargon in Robin Cook's novel does not make it difficult reading. Most of the medical terminology is explained sufficiently for the reader to understand the significance of the medical find.
This is the first time we hear of Jack Stapleton and Laurie Montgomery. We hear of them again in Chromosome 6 and Vector. Robin tells you in more detail about Jack and Laurie then now the latter on. There is the plane crash that takes the life of Jack's family and how he leaves being a eye doctor to be a medical examiner.
I Highly recommended it!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly Good Despite Slow Points, Dec 7 2001
By 
Brennan (Lafayette, LA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Contagion (Mass Market Paperback)
When I was first told about this book by my school's librarian, it didn't sound like something that I would really like. However, I had to read a book so I began Contagion.
The book was a bit difficult to comprehend at times because there are a lot of very technical, medical terms used throughout the entire book. I definitely would not recommend this book to people who are not fairly familiar with biology.
Once one can get past the medical language, this is a pretty good novel. Cook does an excellent job building up tension and the book has an excellent climax. Once the plot of conspiracy and murder began to finally take shape, the book becomes very difficult to put down.
Despite some slow points and repetition at the beginning, Contagion has turned me on to Cook's style and I definitely plan on reading more of his books. He combines the thrill of a Grisham novel with the medical expertise that only a doctor could possess. Contagion is well written with a shocking conclusion. I would recommend this medical thriller to anyone who enjoys books of this genre.
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3.0 out of 5 stars GOOD BUT SOMETHING'S MISSING, Oct. 27 2001
By 
Michael Butts (Berkeley Springs, WV USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Contagion (Mass Market Paperback)
I find Robin Cook's books very good reading and he has a way of combining medical knowledge with thrilling plots. In "Contagion," a maverick pathologist, Jack Stapleton, is convinced that a series of three different types of epidemics is being purposely caused by a large HMO, AmeriCare. When attempts are made on his life, and when one young lady who has tried to help him, is brutally murdered, Jack is pretty sure something fishy is going on. Is it the conglomerate health care organization, or could there be someone else?
The book opens with three mini-chapters in which we meet characters who will later "converge" and flesh out the plot. The key character in the first scenario is pretty well camouflaged by Cook's writing; a clue----watch for nicknames or surnames; in the other two, we meet Stapleton and the lovely advertising executive Teresa Hagen. Add to this some nasty gang members, and you have the recipe for an intriguing, if somewhat heavy-handed plot.
The book is long, but it moves well enough; I liked Stapleton's inter-relations with the African-Americans who let him play basketball with them after he buys lights and buys new equipment. Warren is a particularly enjoyable character. Also, Jack's relationship with Laurie is a nice one, and you can almost see how this relationship will determine the outcome of his relationship with the aforementioned Terese.
My main disappointment with this novel is its denouement. The villain is completely unexpected, at least on my part; and the last scenes in a deserted Catskill cabin border on maudlin melodrama.
One big hole is exactly what the role of the HMO really was in the epidemics; why did Dr. Martin Chavereau fire Beth, really? And why had he ordered plagues from the plague catalogue company?? And when the plot ends, we don't know how these important plot pieces fit the whole puzzle.
I would have given it more stars if these puzzling questions hadn't been left unanswered.
But, in spite of that, I recommend the book. It is a good read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another Threatening Illness, Another Hero, April 16 2001
By 
Tracy Davis (California, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Contagion (Mass Market Paperback)
On one level, Robin Cook's "Contagion" covers familiar ground: a dedicated doctor, a health care system out of control, and a potential plague that could wipe out mankind. The hero in this case is Jack Stapleton, a medical examiner whose loss of family transforms him into an irreverent, anti-authority figure, a white man who lives in Harlem and rides a bicycle through the city. He also, of course, is the only one to see a pattern in several illnesses that appear at an HMO in New York City; illnesses that are rare and deadly, such as the hantavirus. Cook also delves into the advertising world with one character, Terese, who may not be all that she seems. Cook plays several plotlines concurrently, and for the most part successfully, although how they converge is a little predictable. The main illness, a strain of influenza that wiped out more people than World War I, is the most realistic part of the novel: Cook knows his viruses, and has done his historical research. At times predictable, but still gripping, "Contagion" is on the high end of medical thrillers.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Evil Microbes and HMO's Are At It Again, June 28 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Contagion (Audio Cassette)
After losing his family to a plane crash and his medical practice to a big HMO, Dr. Stapleton is off to NYC to be medical examiner (Not a Coronor, Dr. Stapleton makes this known).
Are deaths from three diseases unfortunate or the work of a money grubbing HMO?
This was an exciting book which grabs you from the get go. Dr. Stapleton is a wonderful character who you will rapidly grow to like. What an attitude. Jack is able to ignore his bosses and get away with it the way many of us only wish we could do.
Mr. Mantegna (Reader) can really get you into this book. He does a terrific job at bringing all of the characters to life. You like the characters you are supposed to and hate the ones you are supposed to. In many audio books I find that the reader dosn't do a good job at portraying characters in the light which they were meant to be.
I only gave it 4 stars because it was above average but not outstanding. It didn't stop me from getting out of my car when I got to work or make me spend my lunch time sitting in the gloomy parking garage in my car listening like other books have.
If you like Robin Cook or simply like good thrillers, this is a book for you.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another Good Medical Thriller from Dr. Cook, May 29 1996
By A Customer
This review is from: Contagion (Hardcover)
The book starts off with three seemingly unrelated events that, we are told, will eventually collide. The main character in this story is Dr. Stapleton who works in the morgue of a medical facility. The doctor who is a mystery to his co-workers stumbles upon a mystery in the medical field. Several deaths from a local hospital have apparently occurred from rare diseases. Dr. Stapleton, who appears to enjoy living on the edge -- he's a caucasion living in Harlem, makes a genuine pest of himself while he investigates the origin of the diseases.
His pestering lands him on the most-unwanted-list for the hospital. This fact does not deter Dr. Stapleton since this hospital is also associated with a company who he blames for ruining his life. It's not until an attempt is made on his life that he realizes that he may have stumbled onto something more than a freak occurance. In this book there are other characters who either assist or hender Dr. Stapleton's investigation. The thrill is guessing who is actually "assiting" and who is actually "hendering." People are not
always what they seem or who they seem.

As usual, the medical jargon in Robin Cook's novel does not make it difficult reading. Most of the medical terminology is explained sufficiently for the reader to understand the significance of the medical find. The descriptions of the autopsies is not so graphic that it will offend anyone who normally reads medical thrillers. The book is fast-paced and definitely keeps your attention. The characters in the book are well thought out and quite believable. I enjoyed this book and plan to pass it along to others who share an
interest in mystery novels.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another masterpiece!, June 28 2000
By 
David Segrove "DinA" (Scottsdale, AZ United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Contagion (Mass Market Paperback)
Robin Cook has the wonderful ability to write about complex medical descriptions in everyday English AND write a compelling book at the same time. I read this book in two days - you can't put it down.
The story centers around suspects a connection between multiple disease breakouts in a New York hospital within a matter of days. Each breakout kills several patients, one or more hospital workers from the same department and then is quickly contained.
Mr. Cook spins a tale wrapped in suspense and the reader finds himself reading in eager anticipation of the next disaster and whether or not Jack Stapleton will be able to avert it before it becomes a nationwide problem. Add to the case a contract taken out on the pathologists life, his semi-reluctant relationship with a woman who has a few suprises of her own, plenty of wonderul desciption and you have an incredible book that will keep you turning pages eagerly and wishing there was more at the end...
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3.0 out of 5 stars Starts Out Great, May 1 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Contagion (Mass Market Paperback)
This book really had me hooked from the beginning but the author revealed the method too far into the beginning so you, the reader, have to spend 200 pages reading about people dying and having the lead character hunting around for clues when you already know how they are getting the diseases.
Also, the ending did not fit in with the direction the book took at all. The way the hospital staff was acting you definately didn't think who was behind it all -- maybe if he provided some kind of explanation of why people responded the way they did it would be more plausible. For example, how did the culprits know that the hospital staff was on to them and order them killed?
The books provides a plausible thing happening -- some wacko giving people weird diseases that you can order by mail with a credit card -- but the ending was lame to say the least.
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2.0 out of 5 stars CORNY, Sept. 19 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Contagion (Hardcover)
Robin Cook couldn't decide on which topic to write about. 1) Bash Managed Healthcare 2) NYC ghetto life, 3) contagions, 4) anything else that came to mind. So, he decided to write about all in one book, Contagions. The result, a story line that is ridiculous. When was the last time Cook played a game of basketball with the "brothers" in Harlem? Where was he going with that crap. What happened with the hospital in the end? What the hell were the roles of his superiors at the morgue. Did Cook run out of "cool" names like "Flash" and "Twin for his Harlem gang that he had to make up other irrelevant characters? What happened to Chet? where did everybody go in the end? I know super whitey doc Jack and black gang leader Warren go out to dinner with their "shorties" at the end. GET REAL!!!!!!
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Contagion
Contagion by Robin Cook (Mass Market Paperback - Jan. 11 2002)
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