Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Cook All-New Kindle Paperwhite Music Deals Store NFL Tools

Customer Reviews

9
4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
The Story Teller
Format: Mass Market PaperbackChange
Price:$8.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on November 25, 2003
Vicky Holden, an Arapaho attorney, is called by tribal officials to find a valuable ledger which is supposed to be in a Denver museum. When Vicky investigates, she encounters denials by museum officials that such a ledger ever existed. She theorizes that there is a cover-up because the ledger would reveal that Arapahos were part of an Indian massacre in which the descendants were promised land. The Cherokees try to claim that they were the only people to be killed at the battle. Meanwhile Father John O'Malley returns to the reservation after a month-long sabattical during which he renewed his priestly vows and his resolve not to become involved with Vicky on an emotional level. Soon he is caught up in the murder of a young Arapaho and his path crosses Vicky's while he is investigating. As usual, the two pair up and try to solve the mysterious events occuring in Denver and on the reservation in Wyoming. Father John and Vicky possess a depth which many characters in mysteries lack. Another plus to this series is the information on Indian culture which is portrayed so well in these books.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on May 12, 2000
For some of us, it's enjoyable to read a mystery NOT about finding jewels, treasure maps, precious uranium and the like, but an adventure tale about recovering a lost book, a ledger book, in fact. Coel's mystery picks up with characters she has introduced already in her previous novels: Vicky Holden, an Arapaho attorney, and her colleague, Fr. John O'Malley. Together, the unlikely pair track down a pictographic story drawn in a ledger book detailing the Arapaho involvement (as some of the slain)in the Sand Creek Massacre in 1864. The book is important for the pair to discover because it could be used to reclaim lands taken from them so long ago.
The mystery moves in a measured tempo, with a true rising action and a finale that reads in a flash.
Yet the power in this tale, at least for me, lies in the characterization of its two protagonists, current-day pariahs, as heroes, struggling against the revisionist Historians (--History is written by the winners, goes the adage--) set to try to win again.
Of course, I won't tell you how it ends. Enjoy!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on August 23, 1998
The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGRA) allows tribes to reclaim some of their artifacts from museums, who must provide a list of their collection. Recently the Denver Museum of the West provided a list to the Arapaho Cultural Director Dennis Eagle Cloud, who in turn showed it to elderly storyteller Charles Redman. "Grandfather" immediately claimed the museum omitted the ledger that contains the stories of Chief Niwot as scribed by No-Ta-Nee.
Attorney Vicky Holden explains to the pair that they have no legal recourse in obtaining the ledger. Dennis explodes and accuses his fellow tribesperson as being Anglicized after a decade amongst the whites. Vicky starts to argue back, but stops when Grandfather asks her to look for the book. She reverently agrees. However, before she can begin her search, a Arapaho student is killed while seeking the missing book. With the help of Father John O'Malley, a pastor on the Wind River Reservation, Vicky inquires into the invaluable historical account of her people while trying to ferret out a murderer.
Margaret Coel's latest Native American mystery, THE STORY TELLER, may be her best work to date as she brilliantly ties together a who-done-it with Native American culture. The characters all ring true as they rapidly propel forward the tribal conflict with assimilation, the puzzle of the missing agenda (that provides much insight into the Arapaho lifestyle), and the murder mystery. Ms. Coel is one of the top story tellers of the sub-genre, ranking with the likes of Tony Hillerman. Fans of the contemporary Native American mystery should also read THE DREAM STALKER, THE GHOST WALKER, and THE EAGLE CATCHER for a collection elite novels.

Harriet Klausner
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on August 20, 1998
The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGRA) allows tribes to reclaim some of their artifacts from museums, who must provide a list of their collection. Recently the Denver Museum of the West provided a list to the Arapaho Cultural Director Dennis Eagle Cloud, who in turn showed it to elderly storyteller Charles Redman. "Grandfather" immediately claimed the museum omitted the ledger that contains the stories of Chief Niwot as scribed by No-Ta-Nee.

Attorney Vicky Holden explains to the pair that they have no legal recourse in obtaining the ledger. Dennis explodes and accuses his fellow tribesperson as being Anglicized after a decade amongst the whites. Vicky starts to argue back, but stops when Grandfather asks her to look for the book. She reverently agrees. However, before she can begin her search, a Arapaho student is killed while seeking the missing book. With the help of Father John O'Malley, a pastor on the Wind River Reservation, Vicky inquires into the invaluable historical account of her people while trying to ferret out a murderer.
Margaret Coel's latest Native American mystery, THE STORY TELLER, may be her best work to date as she brilliantly ties together a who-done-it with Native American culture. The characters all ring true as they rapidly propel forward the tribal conflict with assimilation, the puzzle of the missing agenda (that provides much insight into the Arapaho lifestyle), and the murder mystery. Ms. Coel is one of the top story tellers of the sub-genre, ranking with the likes of Tony Hillerman. Fans of the contemporary Native American mystery should also read THE DREAM STALKER, THE GHOST WALKER, and THE EAGLE CATCHER for a collection elite novels.

Harriet Klausner
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on December 11, 2000
I picked up another of Coel's mysteries set on the Arapaho Res. at the hospital giftshop, while desperate for something to read. I found it so good, I sought out the others available in the series. So far "Story Teller" is my favorite. It is a compelling mystery, and the regular characters are also quite realistic. Although not as introspective as Hillerman's Navajo characters; the mystery elements move along at a faster pace. I really like the new genre of mysteries set in-and somewhat illuminating for the nonIndian-the native nations of the West. Coel is one of the best of this genre.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on December 2, 1998
A wonderful story full of Native American history and present day intrique. Margaret Coel writes in a way that paints beautiful pictures of the Southwest and captures the essence of the Native American culture. Father O'Malley and Vicky Holden provide the mystery and intrique and prove to be capable investigators. An excellent book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on May 26, 2000
I like Margaret Coel's casual style of writing. It has a good flow, and she writes in an interesting manner. I thought I had found a real winner in "Storyteller," was interested in the basic storyline. But the book just--ends. There is no big finish like one expects in a mystery. That is a serious flaw, I think.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on December 12, 2001
Make Vick and Father John part of your life. They aren't perfect people like some characters in mystery books but they are good people who struggle with many issue that we do. Fine reading. Enjoyable through out.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 4, 1999
While I enjoyed the mystery in this book, I really enjoyed learning about the restoration of Native American lands and sacred objects!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse