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5.0 out of 5 stars Love
I love all of the Anita Blake books. Laurell K Hamilton is one of my favorite all time authors. From beginning to the end, great book
Published 10 months ago by L. Lively

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Once in a...
Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some...
Published on July 5 2009 by E. A Solinas


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Once in a..., July 5 2009
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some intriguing supporting characters with their own woes and worries, but her writing alternates between choppy and painfully florid, and her heroine rapidly ascends the ladder of Mary-Suedom -- she's allegedly smarter, sexier, stronger and more powerful than anyone else.

Anita receives a call from Richard's brother -- Richard is now in jail in Tennessee, accused of raping a local woman. So Anita heads out to Tennessee with a band of vampires and weres, including Asher, Damian and Jason. They're all intent on proving Richard's innocence, and there are only a matter of days until the "blue moon" exposes him as a werewolf.

Oh yeah, and because of Anita's charming and polite personality, the Master of the City regards their arrival as an act of war. Can't blame him, considering what a reasonable, diplomatic person she is. Uh huh.

Unfortunately Richard's frame-up is at the center of a town-wide conspiracy, and a search for an ancient artifact using illegal means. And Colin (aforementioned Master) is determined to mess with the invading group, even to infecting one of the weres with a corrosive decay, while a werewolf first-one-to-catch-Anita-gets-to-rape-her jaunt in the woods leads to a new encounter with Richard. Unfortunately, his family has gotten drawn into this mess.

"Blue Moon" is one of those novels that is overflowing with promise, but only turns out mediocre. It actually is quite strong for the first half -- obviously-untrue rape charges, a sinister town conspiracy, and brewing tensions between two groups of werewolves and vampires. You can almost overlook Hamilton's obvious contempt for women, cops, and anyone who doesn't live in a major city (according to Hamilton, Tennessee is entirely populated by misogynist racist rednecks).

Unfortunately, halfway through everything comes unravelled -- instead we get an endless stream of absurd situations that emphasize one thing: "Anita is the awesomest most powerful person ever, and everyone wants to have sex with her." Rapist werewolves, sneering at her ex-boyfriend's new woman, being possessed by sex-mad werewolf ghosts, and magically fixing everything just by being so awesome and loving. It's actually pretty nauseating to read someone so spectacularly Mary Sueish.

And Hamilton's writing isn't up to saving the story either. The more hardboiled bits are pretty passable although rather choppily written. But when she tries to wrap that hardboiled prose in lush, sensual prose the results are laughable and appallingly awkward ("The two of us knelt bathed in power. A wind trailed Damian's hair across my face, and I knew the wind was us"). And it doesn't help that Anita constantly tosses off clunky fortune-cookie witticisms ("Love sucks. Sometimes it feels good. Sometimes it's just another way to bleed") and appalling similes (a vampire sucking blood is "like a feeding thing." Well, what else would it be?).

The biggest millstone is Anita: abrasive, arrogant, absurdly hypermacho, and pulls superpowers out of her butt at least twice a day. She's also as airheaded as a ping-pong ball. She causes all the plot's problems by howling verbal abuse at the Master of the City, but it never seems to occur to her that this trouble might be her fault. And it's hard to sympathize with someone who whines about how angry it makes her that her ex-boyfriend, whom she cheated on, is having sex with someone else.

The supporting characters are far more likable -- the fragile vampire Asher manages to be far more endearing than Anita ever does, and the werewolf Jason is quite charming at times. Unfortunately most of the vampires are either there to be ego buffs to Anita (Jean-Claude) or damsels in distress (Damian).

"Blue Moon" is a solid urban fantasy riddled with cracks -- and the Grand Canyon in the middle is the alleged heroine. It's a decent light read if you can focus on the supporting cast and the creepy noir moments, and ignore everything else.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love, May 27 2013
By 
L. Lively "Yankicanuk" (Alberta, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
I love all of the Anita Blake books. Laurell K Hamilton is one of my favorite all time authors. From beginning to the end, great book
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1.0 out of 5 stars And the series comes tumbling down..., May 13 2002
By 
Demosthenes (Rome and Germania) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
The series was--passable--from the beginning, but this book has totally ruined it for me. In an attempt to support the paper-thin plot, LKH throws as much sex as possible into the book, even having Anita, in a move totally uncharacteristic and rather disgusting, on the whole, sleep with Richard. The werebeasts seem to bring out the worst in Anita, and I don't like it. The earlier books of hers, that involved blood and ritual for the magic, were far more interesting. It appears that LKH can only attract readers by appealing to their erotic natures. I hope that Anita, Jean-Claude, and Richard come back in a better form in the next book, because I'm bored with horny werewolves and naked wereleopards. There must be some real plot she can use.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Wholly disapointing., Jan. 6 2002
By 
S. Cardenas (Columbus, OH USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
I really like the Anita Blake series in the beginning. I thought Jean-Claude was too fun for words, and couldn't wait to see what developed between him and Anita. I thought that Richard the putz was (FINALLY!) dispelled.
Man, did I not like where this book took things.
All I can hope is that Richard dies soon, and Anita realizes her idiocy, because otherwise, I'm going to call this series a bust.
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1.0 out of 5 stars I HATE RICHARD!!!, April 13 2001
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
Alright, folks, this book totally sucks! I mean, what kind of woman is Anita, to sleep with two men? She claims to have high morals, but in the end she is unable to resist their advances! The scene near the end when Anita somehow became Freya, the Nordic goddess of love (in this case meaning she was irresistible to all the other male wolves), was soooo crazy--I could practically feel the sexual excitement in the air! I really think that this book is a deterrent to the whole series--Richard is too wimpy and such a goody-goody--Anita needs somebody who understands her, who is dangerous like herself, who has no qualms about the horrors of the world--to sum it up, she should be with Jean-Claude. I mean, Jean-Claude (sigh) is the ultimate sexy vamp--Anita is a fool not to fall in love with him at first sight!!! But I'm still gonna read this series--I want Jean-Claude back!!! Now I can't wait for the 10th book in the series to come out in October 2001!
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1.0 out of 5 stars More sex + less plot = not so hot, Feb. 7 2000
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
I have been a fan of this series for some time, and to me this book is a great disappointment. Whether at the urging of her publisher or out of her own needs Ms. Hamilton has become completely focussed on sex and female dominance. This is not a horror story but a steamy romance novel, which makes me the wrong audience for it. I wouldn't have minded the sex, but it is a poor substitute for the utter lack of plot this volume shows. We have leopards running one way, werewolves running in another, several dashes of stereotypical bumpkins and a vague soupcon of vampires. But absolutely no continuity. This is a real shame! Ms. Hamilton showed considerable potential at one time and it's sad to see greed outpace good writing and taste. Ms. Blake was, at one time, an intriguing main character with a good deal of intelligence. She has degenerated into a loud mouthed, semi-intelligent, over-developed bimboid with a fascination for kinky sex. I hope Ms. Hamilton gets her grip back and returns to writing the good stuff real soon now.
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5.0 out of 5 stars More Asher! More Damien! More of the pard! Let's rejoice!, Nov. 2 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
I'm happy and yet sad -- I just finished Blue Moon and now I have nothing to read until the next book. [sigh] Ah well, I can just reread this one.
I knew from the title that Jean-Claude would most likely be missing for most if not all of the book, but I was pleasantly surprised to find other characters that I loved getting more of a part.
Asher (personally I /like/ the scars ^_-) gets to explore new relations with Anita who realizes she can see Jean-Claude's memories of his past with Asher. Damien's day-resurrection (wasn't that in The Killing Dance?) by Anita results in some strange consequences. Jason gets molested by rotting vamps (again! jeez, why do they keep going after /him/??) and the pard has to learn what Anita thinks her responsibilities are as Nimir-ra.
All in all a great installment in a wonderful series, but I don't like Richard. The boy-scout werewolf is wearing a little thin....
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1.0 out of 5 stars A revolting entry in a wonderful series, Oct. 28 1998
By 
Marianne Frye (Nashua, N.H., USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
This book is a heartbreaking disappointment. The tone of the book is excessively dark and the characters are flat and numb. No reason is given for the change from the last book to this one, although they are set only a few weeks apart in the Anitaverse.
There is almost no real plot except to get Anita away from JC and have her hook up with Richard. Why this couldn't be accomplished by an actual story I don't know. Instead we get a never ending stream of plot devices designed to force the story along, and excuse some really slimy behaviour. The trolls, Richard's imprisonment, and the 'mystery' are all poorly done after thoughts. Richard has also been reduced to a walk on in his own book.
The big 3 characters are different people with the same names. There is no explanation given for why these pod people have replaced the characters we have known and loved for so many books. Thinking, feeling characters that were carefully developed and who actually grew from book to book have been jettisoned.
Anita throws loyalty and trust out the window with no thought or remorse. She has become a cartoon super hero who is all about violence and attitude. She is hard, cold, and vicious, -- why exactly would anyone want to spend time with her ? Her powers keep growing, and she never needs help or support. In short she has become Rambo and the Terminator all rolled into one. She was a fully developed character, she now has the same emotional depth as a frying pan. With her total self-absorbtion and complete lack of perspective she is like an armed 3 year old.
Richard has had his angst and wimpy, whiney behaviour removed, but it hasn't been replaced by anything. So he has been given real vices and a calculating meanness to simulate a personality and a backbone. His true moral dilemas have been reduced to the pallid fear that his mother will find out what he is. All Anita's & Richard's problems have been swept under the rug, and ignored. There is nothing between them but throbbing genitals, and stupid wolf politics.
JC has been tarted up and made to act like a silly high school stud overplaying his hand with an older woman. He is also kept off stage for most of the book, and smeared so as to make Anita's betrayal more palatable.
Most of the time in the book Anita is by herself with these minor 'weres' who are the only ones who get any character development. We get a 'were' sociology course instead of a story to fill the pages. Perhaps the series should be titled 'Anita and the Weres' instead of 'Vampire Hunter'
Of the major characters only Jason shines and grows, while staying Jason. Damian is just used to drop a plot device like a bomb, and even Asher has been reduced to an empty lapdog who joins the long line of all those who are mooning after Anita.
The last chapter should be a severly punished criminal offense. The timeline is jumbled, Anita takes so many contradictory positions she should be inside out, and then she waffles and sends us all back to the beginning of their relationships again. She ends up doing a navel gazing dance that is supposed to get her off the hook with the audience. What it really does is keep her from taking responsibility for her own actions and moving forward.
Finally how is it possible to write this book without a reunion scene in St. Louis ? That nothing has been resolved or even dealt with is a childish ploy by the author to make sure we all tune in next week to see who 'shot JR'. It also illustrates the lack of truth in this story and the disrespectful way both the characters and the fans have been treated. I feel insulted and used.
I also wonder what is next for Anita the beserker -- cannibalism ? With her prudishness still intact -- I imagine she will eat around the naughty bits.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This One Is My Favorite, Sept. 13 2002
By 
Valerie Mangan (No. Babylon, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
I've read all the Anita Blake books. I actually have very mixed feelings about them, mostly because I find Anita Blake a hard character to truly like and relate to, and as the books are written in a first person narrative you are stuck in her head, reading only her thoughts (a very limiting style of writing). And with her ever increasing powers, she is more Mighty Morphin' Super Anita now then the very human, complicated woman she started out as. However, I liked her in Blue Moon and I liked how the story took us out of St. Louis.
The plot has been described numerous times here, so I'll just give my overall impressions. I liked the storyline, I liked Anita getting away from Jean-Claude for a bit (his pouting boyfriend scene in the beginning of the book is cringe-worthy). I prefer Richard, and frankly have a tough time figuring out why he gets so much [heat] from other readers...except, perhaps, that he's serious competition for Jean-Claude. People seem to forget every manipulative and underhanded thing Jean-Claude does. Hey, I expect it from him, he's Master of the City, but it hardly makes him a good guy. You'd think that having morals, and very human conflicts about being a werewolf was some sort of criminal offense. I think Richard is a far more complex character *because* he struggles with his conscience and his morals and has difficulty reconciling his 2 selves. And frankly THANK GOD for ONE character that has some qualms about Anita's penchant for violence and killing. One of my favorite parts of the book is Richard telling her that if he can't have monogamy from her, she can't have it from him. ITS ABOUT TIME somehow finally called Anita on her annoying double standards. I'm for Richard all the way, but also find myself hoping that all 3 players in the TRI continue to be bonded, and their relationship continues to evolve (after book 10 though, forget it...author blows it BIGTIME).
Even though I enjoyed this book a lot, I still can't say that I think Laurell Hamilton is a particularly gifted writer. She has the talent to tell an engaging and imaginative story. I particularly find her idea of having lycanthropy be a disease, like AIDS, very creative (though she doesn't really flesh out this idea very well). But she repeats phrases over and over, her scenes can be very repetitive (past the 3rd book, most readers could probably write the numerous "Anita pulls her gun almost instantly on someone, makes some sarcastic quip and must extracate herself from the room" scenes). She has described at least 3 different characters as "raising as though lifted by strings" and her attention to continuity and detail is not even close to being the best. She also has a very disconcerting fascination with rape and attempted rape. How she has used it over and over in her books gives me pause. Was there any real reason for its inclusion in this book?
But of all the books, Blue Moon is the one I would recommend most highly, and the one I would most likely want to reread. It really is a fun read, even with the problems. And just because it isn't said enough, GO RICHARD !!
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2.0 out of 5 stars Once in a..., Nov. 25 2009
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: Blue Moon (Paperback)
Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some intriguing supporting characters with their own woes and worries, but her writing alternates between choppy and painfully florid, and her heroine rapidly ascends the ladder of Mary-Suedom -- she's allegedly smarter, sexier, stronger and more powerful than anyone else.

Anita receives a call from Richard's brother -- Richard is now in jail in Tennessee, accused of raping a local woman. So Anita heads out to Tennessee with a band of vampires and weres, including Asher, Damian and Jason. They're all intent on proving Richard's innocence, and there are only a matter of days until the "blue moon" exposes him as a werewolf.

Oh yeah, and because of Anita's charming and polite personality, the Master of the City regards their arrival as an act of war. Can't blame him, considering what a reasonable, diplomatic person she is. Uh huh.

Unfortunately Richard's frame-up is at the center of a town-wide conspiracy, and a search for an ancient artifact using illegal means. And Colin (aforementioned Master) is determined to mess with the invading group, even to infecting one of the weres with a corrosive decay, while a werewolf first-one-to-catch-Anita-gets-to-rape-her jaunt in the woods leads to a new encounter with Richard. Unfortunately, his family has gotten drawn into this mess.

"Blue Moon" is one of those novels that is overflowing with promise, but only turns out mediocre. It actually is quite strong for the first half -- obviously-untrue rape charges, a sinister town conspiracy, and brewing tensions between two groups of werewolves and vampires. You can almost overlook Hamilton's obvious contempt for women, cops, and anyone who doesn't live in a major city (according to Hamilton, Tennessee is entirely populated by misogynist racist rednecks).

Unfortunately, halfway through everything comes unravelled -- instead we get an endless stream of absurd situations that emphasize one thing: "Anita is the awesomest most powerful person ever, and everyone wants to have sex with her." Rapist werewolves, sneering at her ex-boyfriend's new woman, being possessed by sex-mad werewolf ghosts, and magically fixing everything just by being so awesome and loving. It's actually pretty nauseating to read someone so spectacularly Mary Sueish.

And Hamilton's writing isn't up to saving the story either. The more hardboiled bits are pretty passable although rather choppily written. But when she tries to wrap that hardboiled prose in lush, sensual prose the results are laughable and appallingly awkward ("The two of us knelt bathed in power. A wind trailed Damian's hair across my face, and I knew the wind was us"). And it doesn't help that Anita constantly tosses off clunky fortune-cookie witticisms ("Love sucks. Sometimes it feels good. Sometimes it's just another way to bleed") and appalling similes (a vampire sucking blood is "like a feeding thing." Well, what else would it be?).

The biggest millstone is Anita: abrasive, arrogant, absurdly hypermacho, and pulls superpowers out of her butt at least twice a day. She's also as airheaded as a ping-pong ball. She causes all the plot's problems by howling verbal abuse at the Master of the City, but it never seems to occur to her that this trouble might be her fault. And it's hard to sympathize with someone who whines about how angry it makes her that her ex-boyfriend, whom she cheated on, is having sex with someone else.

The supporting characters are far more likable -- the fragile vampire Asher manages to be far more endearing than Anita ever does, and the werewolf Jason is quite charming at times. Unfortunately most of the vampires are either there to be ego buffs to Anita (Jean-Claude) or damsels in distress (Damian).

"Blue Moon" is a solid urban fantasy riddled with cracks -- and the Grand Canyon in the middle is the alleged heroine. It's a decent light read if you can focus on the supporting cast and the creepy noir moments, and ignore everything else.
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Blue Moon
Blue Moon by Laurell K. Hamilton (Hardcover - Dec 2 2008)
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