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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some intriguing supporting characters with their own woes and worries, but her writing alternates between choppy and painfully florid, and her heroine rapidly ascends the ladder of Mary-Suedom -- she's allegedly smarter, sexier, stronger and more powerful than anyone else.

Anita receives a call from Richard's brother -- Richard is now in jail in Tennessee, accused of raping a local woman. So Anita heads out to Tennessee with a band of vampires and weres, including Asher, Damian and Jason. They're all intent on proving Richard's innocence, and there are only a matter of days until the "blue moon" exposes him as a werewolf.

Oh yeah, and because of Anita's charming and polite personality, the Master of the City regards their arrival as an act of war. Can't blame him, considering what a reasonable, diplomatic person she is. Uh huh.

Unfortunately Richard's frame-up is at the center of a town-wide conspiracy, and a search for an ancient artifact using illegal means. And Colin (aforementioned Master) is determined to mess with the invading group, even to infecting one of the weres with a corrosive decay, while a werewolf first-one-to-catch-Anita-gets-to-rape-her jaunt in the woods leads to a new encounter with Richard. Unfortunately, his family has gotten drawn into this mess.

"Blue Moon" is one of those novels that is overflowing with promise, but only turns out mediocre. It actually is quite strong for the first half -- obviously-untrue rape charges, a sinister town conspiracy, and brewing tensions between two groups of werewolves and vampires. You can almost overlook Hamilton's obvious contempt for women, cops, and anyone who doesn't live in a major city (according to Hamilton, Tennessee is entirely populated by misogynist racist rednecks).

Unfortunately, halfway through everything comes unravelled -- instead we get an endless stream of absurd situations that emphasize one thing: "Anita is the awesomest most powerful person ever, and everyone wants to have sex with her." Rapist werewolves, sneering at her ex-boyfriend's new woman, being possessed by sex-mad werewolf ghosts, and magically fixing everything just by being so awesome and loving. It's actually pretty nauseating to read someone so spectacularly Mary Sueish.

And Hamilton's writing isn't up to saving the story either. The more hardboiled bits are pretty passable although rather choppily written. But when she tries to wrap that hardboiled prose in lush, sensual prose the results are laughable and appallingly awkward ("The two of us knelt bathed in power. A wind trailed Damian's hair across my face, and I knew the wind was us"). And it doesn't help that Anita constantly tosses off clunky fortune-cookie witticisms ("Love sucks. Sometimes it feels good. Sometimes it's just another way to bleed") and appalling similes (a vampire sucking blood is "like a feeding thing." Well, what else would it be?).

The biggest millstone is Anita: abrasive, arrogant, absurdly hypermacho, and pulls superpowers out of her butt at least twice a day. She's also as airheaded as a ping-pong ball. She causes all the plot's problems by howling verbal abuse at the Master of the City, but it never seems to occur to her that this trouble might be her fault. And it's hard to sympathize with someone who whines about how angry it makes her that her ex-boyfriend, whom she cheated on, is having sex with someone else.

The supporting characters are far more likable -- the fragile vampire Asher manages to be far more endearing than Anita ever does, and the werewolf Jason is quite charming at times. Unfortunately most of the vampires are either there to be ego buffs to Anita (Jean-Claude) or damsels in distress (Damian).

"Blue Moon" is a solid urban fantasy riddled with cracks -- and the Grand Canyon in the middle is the alleged heroine. It's a decent light read if you can focus on the supporting cast and the creepy noir moments, and ignore everything else.
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Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some intriguing supporting characters with their own woes and worries, but her writing alternates between choppy and painfully florid, and her heroine rapidly ascends the ladder of Mary-Suedom -- she's allegedly smarter, sexier, stronger and more powerful than anyone else.

Anita receives a call from Richard's brother -- Richard is now in jail in Tennessee, accused of raping a local woman. So Anita heads out to Tennessee with a band of vampires and weres, including Asher, Damian and Jason. They're all intent on proving Richard's innocence, and there are only a matter of days until the "blue moon" exposes him as a werewolf.

Oh yeah, and because of Anita's charming and polite personality, the Master of the City regards their arrival as an act of war. Can't blame him, considering what a reasonable, diplomatic person she is. Uh huh.

Unfortunately Richard's frame-up is at the center of a town-wide conspiracy, and a search for an ancient artifact using illegal means. And Colin (aforementioned Master) is determined to mess with the invading group, even to infecting one of the weres with a corrosive decay, while a werewolf first-one-to-catch-Anita-gets-to-rape-her jaunt in the woods leads to a new encounter with Richard. Unfortunately, his family has gotten drawn into this mess.

"Blue Moon" is one of those novels that is overflowing with promise, but only turns out mediocre. It actually is quite strong for the first half -- obviously-untrue rape charges, a sinister town conspiracy, and brewing tensions between two groups of werewolves and vampires. You can almost overlook Hamilton's obvious contempt for women, cops, and anyone who doesn't live in a major city (according to Hamilton, Tennessee is entirely populated by misogynist racist rednecks).

Unfortunately, halfway through everything comes unravelled -- instead we get an endless stream of absurd situations that emphasize one thing: "Anita is the awesomest most powerful person ever, and everyone wants to have sex with her." Rapist werewolves, sneering at her ex-boyfriend's new woman, being possessed by sex-mad werewolf ghosts, and magically fixing everything just by being so awesome and loving. It's actually pretty nauseating to read someone so spectacularly Mary Sueish.

And Hamilton's writing isn't up to saving the story either. The more hardboiled bits are pretty passable although rather choppily written. But when she tries to wrap that hardboiled prose in lush, sensual prose the results are laughable and appallingly awkward ("The two of us knelt bathed in power. A wind trailed Damian's hair across my face, and I knew the wind was us"). And it doesn't help that Anita constantly tosses off clunky fortune-cookie witticisms ("Love sucks. Sometimes it feels good. Sometimes it's just another way to bleed") and appalling similes (a vampire sucking blood is "like a feeding thing." Well, what else would it be?).

The biggest millstone is Anita: abrasive, arrogant, absurdly hypermacho, and pulls superpowers out of her butt at least twice a day. She's also as airheaded as a ping-pong ball. She causes all the plot's problems by howling verbal abuse at the Master of the City, but it never seems to occur to her that this trouble might be her fault. And it's hard to sympathize with someone who whines about how angry it makes her that her ex-boyfriend, whom she cheated on, is having sex with someone else.

The supporting characters are far more likable -- the fragile vampire Asher manages to be far more endearing than Anita ever does, and the werewolf Jason is quite charming at times. Unfortunately most of the vampires are either there to be ego buffs to Anita (Jean-Claude) or damsels in distress (Damian).

"Blue Moon" is a solid urban fantasy riddled with cracks -- and the Grand Canyon in the middle is the alleged heroine. It's a decent light read if you can focus on the supporting cast and the creepy noir moments, and ignore everything else.
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on July 13, 2001
I LOVED the previous Anita Blake stories, so I was totally blown away when I read Blue Moon. Up until this point, I thought Anita was a fabulous role model: strong, moral, and fearless. Well, now we can throw moral out of that listing. I know most of the other reviews gave away who she slept with in the book, so I won't dance around the issue. First we find that Richard is not at all like what he was portrayed as in the previous novels, then we discover that Anita has turned into a big ball of hormones. I have no problem with a certain degree of sex and romance in the Blake series, but it seems as though this book was written specifically for the sexual aspect. Sorry if I sound like a prude, but I was just totally appalled by Anita's betrayl of Jean-Claude. I couldn't put down all of the previous books, but this one is giving me problems. I think I'll finish it just so I can get to Obsidian Butterfly, which I've been told has an actual story. Well, I feel better now that I've gotten to complain about it (no one I know personally has read the series). DO read the Anita Blake series. Few books are like it. Maybe you'll enjoy Blue Moon more than I did.
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on September 6, 1999
I discovered Anita Blake about a month ago and have just finished the series. Hamilton is not much of a wordsmith, but she does an amazing job of holding your attention through her vivid characterizations and the neverending twists and turn the story takes. Saddly this book was missing what the author does best. There is very little story, which is odd since she usually tries to cram too many plots into her books and the characters were almost indistinguishable from each other. Even the old familiar ones didn't act like themselves. Another growing problem is that with each book she is enlarging the details of her world and the contradictions are mounting at an alarming rate. For instance early in the serious it was explained that having the first mark protected her from being infected by a wereanimal, but in this book she is afraid of being infected. Also the vampires are now very easy to kill, where as in other books it was a lot tricker. Another put-off was the explaination of S&M terms and the constant discussion of homosexual vs straight. Does Hamilton really think that her readers need everything spelled out? Not to mention that it takes away from the erotic quality of the work to try to define things in such a mundane fashion. Of course I'll read the next one, I just hope it is a lot better then this one.
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on August 30, 1999
What made the Anita Blake series so enjoyable was its original characterization and clever plot lines. This last book in the series feels like a betrayal. I'll be the first to admit that in the beginning I was hooked on the possibility of romance between Jean-Claude and Anita, but I had hoped for something more classic that a "bodice ripper." True love that spans centuries is a great deal more interesting than tawdry sex. Richard can't possibly be Anita's soul mate. He's just not strong enough for her.
The plot seems to suffer as much as the weak characterization in this novel - at least as far as Anita, Richard and Jean-Claude are concerned. Anita's actions are contrived and implausible in this book if you compare it to the first three books in the series.
Perhaps this series should have ceased several books ago (at least two) before it became disappointing. Hopefully the ninth book will return to the serie's roots and will redeem this effort, and if it does, I almost hope it will draw the series to a satisfying and logical conclusion. I'm sure Ms. Hamilton's other series will provide a great deal of entertainment and that she has many more series ideas up her sleeve.
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on January 24, 1999
I love the series, and I love Anita. But, it seems that this story is rather anticlimactic. First of all, there are a lot of loose ends and it seems at many times, odd situations are thrown in to make characters do things as if it were a desperate attemt to push the story along.
First of all, since our pristine Anita can't be sex-obssessed, we have Raina inhibit her body so she can be a nymphomaniac against her will. But instead of hot and steamy, we get droll and boring.
Jean Claude does a complete 180 by suddenly turning desperate and pathetic. He begs Anita to stay with him, which is completely a non-Jean action. JC's supposed to be cocky, suave, and a seducer, not husbandly and immature. Lots of the characters' original convictions and traits are thrown out of window (Richard's respect for women, as he sleeps with a lot of them; Anita's chastity; and Jean Claudes cool), and leaves me confused in reading it. "What happened?" I wonder.
LKH doesn't take this opportunity to develop Richard. We know everything about Jean Claude, but Richard is still left rather two dimensional. It seems a waste of plot usage. I think that the lack of depth in Richard is the reason this book seems more like a comic book. This edition is a little shallow and underdeveloped. The only characters that get developed are Cherry, Zane, and Jason.
I hope the next book focuses more on the characters than action and sex. It was the depth of emotions of the characters that made the action exciting and the steamy scenes sensual. Without this foundation, this book really does read out to be more like a comic book with raunchy sex and too much gung-ho action.
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on November 27, 1998
L. Hamilton seems to have trapped herself in continuing downward spiral. With each book, she feels the need to one-up the previous in terms of the power of adversity that Anita Blake faces, and subsequently increases Anita's abilities in step. Gone is the gritty down-to-earth nature of Anita in the earlier books that was such a humorous juxtaposition to the bizarre world she lives in. Now she seems to be empowered to do almost anything; heal at will, summon apparently endless resources to deal with her problems, or call on her now long list of friends to help her. Anita's "if it's you or me, it's you" pragmatism of the earlier novels has become flippant disregard for others bordering on brutality. Further, the violence and gore attendent to the story appears to almost be the point instead of a byproduct, and frankly seems to be getting out of hand. Very disappointing. Ms. Hamilton, if you chance to read this - please, save this character. At the current rate in the next novel she will kill of the root of all evil in the universe, and then where will you be?
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on October 18, 1998
I love this series, but this book is rather annoying. Anita was such a wonderful character back in the first few books, and I know character development is important, but she's becoming rather sex obsessed and it's making me wonder where her high standards and moral values went. It's not like I care if she's sex obsessed and will never be able to choose between Richard and Jean-Claude, you have to know by now that it's impossible for her to choose one. I'm sick of this, "Who am I going to sleep with today?" Frankly, I don't know why those two put up with her. She's always reminding someone of how many kills she has, how good she is at it, how she's the most powerful necrowhatever in the nation or where else, how she's the queen of this, the Lupa of that, how she's dominate over that person over there, and that she has two really great guys begging her to be with them. She takes a lot of that for granted and I'm getting sick of the sleeping around and the overemphasis on sex as a whole. They should all really get a life and stop worshipping her like a god. Because she'll probably be deemed one in the next book. And I don't know about anyone else but I'm getting tired of the fact that she has no faults. She always wins a fight, pointless little arguments. Even if she doesn't win the battle you know she'll ultimately win the war. Because she's the "heroine" or something. This one wasn't a page turner, maybe I'm just not really into the lycanthropes and like the vampire stories better. I think that Jean-Claude should play more of a part in these books since he's much deeper than Richard will ever be and brings more to the story. Richard is a whiner and generally annoying. This is a good book considering it is part of a good series but it is a pitiful book standing on it's own. If it wasn't part of this series I would give it one star. Lucky for it.
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on October 12, 1998
I read the entire Anita Blake series 4 months ago and this last book, and especially the rave reviews for it, leave me confused...
The last few books in this series have been more character development than mysteries or thrillers. But at least there was SOMEthing to built a plot on, however thin. "Blue Moon" doesn't even have that! The "mystery" -- supposedly the "spear that pierced Christ's side" -- didn't even come up until very late in the book. And then, to make matters worse, there didn't turn out to be any spear, anyway!!
This whole book served as nothing more than a vehicle for lots of pointless violence and far too much sex. Violence can be very effective -- and it was fairly effective in the earlier books -- but this story throws in killings, beatings, etc. apparently just so the heroine can rip her clothes off (reminiscent of Captain Kirk in "Star Trek" -- anything to tear his shirt!). Sex, too, can move the story along nicely, but there has to BE a story first. As far as I could tell, "Blue Moon" would not exist if all the sex and violence were removed. Which means that those elements WERE the entire plot. And that isn't enough.
I agree character development in a series is important but there does need to be a plot, too; otherwise you end up with a Harlequin Romance. I hope the next book gives the relationship stuff a rest and gives us something to turn the pages for. If I'm subjected to another book full of "who should I sleep with??" I'll have to give it a miss.
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on November 2, 1998
Up until this book I've been very much a fan of this series. Anita Blake was a welcome change from the usual simpering horror heroine. While she was obviously far from normal sexually, her struggle with nymphomania was never one of the primary themes of the books.
With Blue Moon all this has changed. Ms. Blake has suddenly moved from denial to full scale acting out. In addition, every single creature that is around her is also caught up in an orgy of sex and violence. It gets so frantic and so silly that I really can't tell if I'm reading a bad romantic novel or a bad sex novel. But I do know that I certainly was not reading a good horror story.
I know this is going to sound sexist, but Blue Moon seems to me to be more of a woman's book than a man's. I'm sure I'm responding to the steamy quality of the book and it's viewpoint. In my defense I can only say that I don't care for male machismo any more than I do for this kind of stuff.
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