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169 Reviews
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66 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing
I absolutely LOVED this book. Kathryn Stockett did an amazing job. I loved how the story was written from the perspectives of the different women. I enjoyed seeing the world through their very different eyes and watching them develop throughout the story. The beautifully descriptive writing drew me in and made me feel like I was right there. This is an intense story of...
Published on Feb. 10 2009 by Tara Robertson

versus
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars They've done it again
I kept hearing all the excitement this book and its movie are generating, so I bought a copy and read it cover-to-cover. The author certainly has talent as a writer but I am disappointed at yet another *Great White Hope* story where groups or generations of disenfranchised minorities are powerless until the white hero or heroine swoops in and liberates these poor folk -...
Published on Sept. 27 2011 by P. Sibun


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Captivating, Dec 25 2010
By 
Kyla Hanington (Nanaimo, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
This book is so absorbing, so interesting, so well-written and masterfully spun, that I cannot but urge you to run, not walk, to the nearest book store to get your own copy (or, better yet given your current position in front of your computer, to click the buy option and get a copy of this book for yourself and one each for your three favourite people). I was given this book for Christmas - I opened it on Christmas Eve and please note the date that I am writing this review! - I could not stop reading it but I also did not want to race through it, I wanted to savour it and yet stay immersed in it. Truly wonderful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable story about an otherwise heavy subject, July 13 2011
By 
MD (Toronto, ON) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Help (Paperback)
What an amazing read. Despite what would typically be considered heavy subject matter, this is a story told with hope, happiness, joy, and a true feeling of success. But of course, the frustration, inequity, cruelty, and sadness are all there too. That's what makes this such a spectacular read. Every emotion imaginable is represented. You will find yourself comparing the relationships to your own real-life relationships - not just between races/cultures, but also between friends, and among family. The characterization is done wonderfully, to the point that 20 pages from the end, I became reluctant to finish reading, knowing that I would miss the characters when it was over!

This was a gripping story and an easy read. Highly recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Help, Feb. 18 2011
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
Loved this book.
Loved the writing. Kathryn Stockett developes wonderful characters that i became very attached to.
She includes wonderful snippets of humour throughout, which i felt helped me to understand the women during this tough period in history.
The book gave me insight to the very difficult times in the Southern United States in the early 1960's.
i was sad when i finished the book, i wanted it to keep going and going.
i would highly recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great read! Brought such insight into an era of black vs. white., Dec 29 2010
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
I only read this book because it was the assigned reading for my book club. I'm so glad I did because it brought such insight into how white people treated the blacks back in the 60's in Jackson, Mississippi. The mentality of some of the white women was just outrageous. It made me think of what my actions and mentality would've been like in such a time. Anyway, this is definitely a book to read, you won't be disappointed!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not enough stars on the rating chart, Jan. 19 2011
By 
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
I'd give this book 10 stars if I could. A priceless gem. My only complaint was that I hated finishing it. Superbly written and I'd recommend it to everyone.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars They've done it again, Sept. 27 2011
This review is from: The Help (Paperback)
I kept hearing all the excitement this book and its movie are generating, so I bought a copy and read it cover-to-cover. The author certainly has talent as a writer but I am disappointed at yet another *Great White Hope* story where groups or generations of disenfranchised minorities are powerless until the white hero or heroine swoops in and liberates these poor folk - giving them an avenue to finally express themselves, get an education, get justice... Dangerous Minds, Cry Freedom, The Blind Side, Hardball, Wildcats, Radio, the Love Guru, Cool Runnings, Bagger Vance, Dances With Wolves, Amistad, Ghosts of the Mississippi, Mississippi Burning, Freedom Writers...
And now The Help.

All these told primarily from the white Hero(ine)'s viewpoint where the minority characters are in supporting roles and waiting for the guidance of the messianic white character. I'm tired of these books and films generating all the positive press and revenue when the stories of people who actually had something to lose (besides their country-club membership) play bit parts in their own histories!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Help, Aug. 29 2010
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
'"The Help'" by Kathryn Stockett is the type of book I love; I made so many friends while reading the book that once I was finished I started missing them.

This story is told by three ladies: Skeeter who is white and fresh out of college and returns to living at home with her parents and their African American hired help, Aibileen who is a middle age African American maid who also raises the children of the families she works for and by Minny another African American maid who tends to speak her mind and often loses her jobs as a result.

Skeeter when she arrives back home finds out that the African American lady who took care of her while growing up no longer works for the family and no one will tell Skeeter why or where she has gone. The time period is in the 1960's and Mississippi is boiling with racism and Skeeter decides to write a novel about African American women and their stories about working for white families. The result of writing this book alienates Skeeter from her friends and puts in danger the lives of those who tell her their stories.

Aibileen, who has recently lost her son, is the first to tell her stories to Skeeter and she and Skeeter form a friendship and work together to get other maids to tell their stories.

Minny is reluctant, but eventually agrees to tell her stories to Skeeter. She has a hard time keeping employment, and is outspoken and abrupt with people, but deep down she protects those she loves even if it means sacrificing her own protection.

This book shows the fine lines people walk when confronted with how they feel about each other whether in regards to race, income, education or family connections. It shows how someone can depend entirely on another person to raise their children or to cook and clean for them yet will not let them use the same bathroom or share the same grocery stores.

While some stories of the maids or stark and shocking some are touching and show the depth of intimacy and caring between the help and the employer. The truth behind race and friendship and how it affects society and families is wonderfully portrayed in this book.

I loved this book and it made me weep, laugh and form friendships, it is a book I will be thinking about for a while. To see beyond race, status, wealth and education and truly look at who a person is, that is what I want to do. Wonderful read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars "We done something brave and good here.", May 15 2010
By 
Kona (Emerald City) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
The story is set in Jackson, Mississippi, in the early sixties, and narrated by three women: Aibileen is an older housemaid who has raised seventeen white children, Minny is a younger domestic with a hot temper, and Skeeter is a wealthy, white, college graduate who has just returned home to her critical mother.

The story starts off as a look at bored, rich women with nothing better to do than gossip about each other while being insensitive if not downright cruel to "the help." Then, Skeeter decides to write a book about what black maids really think of their white employers and the grits really hit the fan.

The book started off slowly but by the middle of the book there was so much drama and excitement that I couldn't turn the pages quickly enough. Jim Crow and the KKK were in full force and the maids risked their lives to contribute to the book. The three women's stories were authentic and riveting and the setting was so real I could feel the stultifying humidity, hear the buzzing of the mosquitoes, and smell Minny's caramel cake. An insightful and very well-written look at segregation in the South. Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One to read, and then reflect on, April 22 2010
By 
BookChick (Simcoe, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
"The Help" is the story of three very different women living in Jackson, Mississippi in the 1960's. Skeeter is a 22-year-old living with her parents on their cotton farm. Since she's from an affluent family, she belongs to the various elite societies and clubs in Jackson, but she yearns for more. She longs to become a writer, a real writer, and she isn't happy just settling into high society and marriage without another thought. Aibileen is the black maid to the Elizabeth Leefolt, one of Skeeter's best friends. She's still mourning the tragic and sudden loss of her son three years prior, and it breaks her heart that her employer Elizabeth dislikes her own daughter, Mae Mobley. Minny was the maid to elderly Miss Walter, but when Miss Walter's daughter, Hilly, puts her into a home, Minny is out of a job. With a drunk and abusive husband and five children at home she needs to find a new position, fast, but Hilly has spread false rumours around town that Minny is a thief, so Minny must take a risky job working for Jackson's social outcast, Miss Celia.

After a series of events that emphasizes how badly the black maids in Jackson are often treated, these three women come together to write a book that could change the lives of the maids forever. They must overcome adversity and put themselves at great risk to do so, but all three feel that it is a risk that must be taken.

"The Help" was eye-opening from the beginning. Written by Kathryn Stockett, a woman who actually grew up with a black maid in her home in Jackson, it offers a new perspective on how black people were often treated in the South in the 1960's. They often came in and raised the children, did the majority of the work and cooking, and were still treated like vermin, asked to use seperate toilets and dishes and tables so that their "diseases" were not caught. Stockett makes sure that she shows both sides of the story, though, and also tells stories of the maids who were treated like family along with those that were not.

The three fictional women portrayed in this book are often gentle, yet courageous, and use the power of their words rather than violence to effect social change. Written about a time when living in America could be hostile and even dangerous for black people, these women represent an important shift in perspective. A beautifully written book, this is one that everyone should take the time to both read and reflect on.
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4.0 out of 5 stars SLAVERY DAYS, March 12 2010
By 
This review is from: The Help (Hardcover)
"Get the house straightened up and then go and fix some of that chicken salad."

These were the days when white people treated their black servants like slaves. They never ate the same food, they had to work long tough hours doing housekeeping and cooking to boot. train their children, and not to forget to use the outside bathroom.

These families will continue to do this until the day when one of their white daughters Skeeter returns to her parents' home and decides to evaluate these 'working' conditions.

It hurts her to see how they treat the help and she sets up a meeting with the staff from various households to have them have their say.

And a lot is said.

Between Abilene, Skeeter and Minnie, the wheels start rolling and everything come out in the wash.

This book will set you to thinking as it did the families, who when were awakened looked at the consequence as an act of betrayal.
Reviewed by Heather Marshall Negahdar (SUGAR-CANE 12/03/2010)

Reviewed by Heather Marshall Negahdar (SUGAR-CANE 19/08/09)
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The Help
The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Paperback - April 5 2011)
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