Customer Reviews


6 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars T Is for Tremendously Told Tale
Sue Grafton is always exploring new subjects and new ways of writing for her readers. T is for Trespass continues that worthy heritage for this terrific series.

If you haven't read any books in this series, I suggest you go back and read them in alphabetical order beginning with A is for Alibi. You have a major treat ahead of you. The series develops over a...
Published on Dec 5 2007 by Donald Mitchell

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars T is for too many coincidences - only okay
First Sentence: She had a real name, of course--the one she'd been given at birth and had used for much of her life--but now she had a new name.

When Kinsey's elderly neighbor, Gus, takes a fall and breaks his collarbone, Kinsey locates and summons his daughter from the East Coast. Too busy to stay and take care of her father, she hires a woman named Solana...
Published on Jan. 4 2010 by L. J. Roberts


Most Helpful First | Newest First

3.0 out of 5 stars T is for too many coincidences - only okay, Jan. 4 2010
By 
L. J. Roberts (Oakland, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: T Is For Trespass (Hardcover)
First Sentence: She had a real name, of course--the one she'd been given at birth and had used for much of her life--but now she had a new name.

When Kinsey's elderly neighbor, Gus, takes a fall and breaks his collarbone, Kinsey locates and summons his daughter from the East Coast. Too busy to stay and take care of her father, she hires a woman named Solana Rojas and has Kinsey do a cursory background check. This is a case of what Kinsey did not find; Solana is not who she says.

I hadn't read Grafton in awhile, and now I remember why. Set in the 1980s, in Kinsey's life we are only about 5 years ahead of the first book. However, in those 5 years, Kinsey really has not changed. It's not that just that her habits have not changed--she still quarter-cuts her sandwiches, loves McDonalds Quarter-Pounders with cheese, and small places; okay, she has a new car--but she hasn't grown emotionally.

I do love her sense of humor and her loyalty to her friends. Grafton, in general, has created a wonderful set of characters, both the traditional supporting characters and the new ones. The villain of the piece is wonderfully scary and diabolical.

I found the plot interesting and very much conducive to a one-sitting read. I actually liked that Kinsey was working more than one case, as it seemed more realistic, but there were times where she seemed a bit slow on the uptake.

The biggest problem I had with the book is Grafton's writing style. There were multiple, massive portents that then diminished the element of suspense, in many cases, the coincidences so numerous and large you could drive a truck through them. A couple of times, I found myself saying "Oh, please!".

The book wasn't awful; I did read it in one sitting. I shall read the next Grafton, but only because I already own it. Any more after that are doubtful.

T is for Trespass (PI, Kinsey Milhone, So. Cal, Cont (1980s) - Ok
Grafton, Sue - 20th in series
Putnam Adult, 2007, US Hardcover - ISBN: 9780399154485
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars T Is for Tremendously Told Tale, Dec 5 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: T is for Trespass (Hardcover)
Sue Grafton is always exploring new subjects and new ways of writing for her readers. T is for Trespass continues that worthy heritage for this terrific series.

If you haven't read any books in this series, I suggest you go back and read them in alphabetical order beginning with A is for Alibi. You have a major treat ahead of you. The series develops over a number of years, and many references are clearer throughout if you've read the earlier books.

The writing innovation here is to have two narrators, Kinsey Millhone, and Kinsey's nemesis, named Solana Rojas, whom fate brings together in Kinsey's neighborhood to create a taut suspense story. You will see the future conflict clearly coming, but won't know what to expect. Sue Grafton does a wonderful job of filling the story with lots of surprises to heighten the suspense. The struggle between the two women is intensified by Solana being portrayed from the beginning as being the psychological opposite of Kinsey. You'll enjoy a heightened sense of tension by knowing what the two determined women are thinking about and planning to do.

The new topic is how some people prey on others in particularly chilling ways by taking advantage of the presumption we hold that we are surrounded by trustworthy people. It's a cautionary tale that will leave you wanting to do more to check out those with whom you and your family come into contact. The book is so powerful in this dimension that at times you'll feel like you are reading a nonfiction book about a tragedy.

As the book opens, Solana is looking for opportunity and Kinsey is looking for some work. Solana has just left her last job and explains what her objectives are in Chapter One. Kinsey picks up in Chapter Two to describe how detecting hasn't been very good lately. To make up for that, Kinsey has been serving summonses. Kinsey hears a sound while she's on her way to work, and that sound leads both women onto a collision course.

In the book, Kinsey works on several assignments . . . looking for evidence to clear a defendant in a car accident, assisting a landlord to remove deadbeat tenants, and checking out references for a new employee. She also finds that being a caring neighbor can be time consuming.

Kinsey's personal life is at a low ebb. She's not seeing anyone. She's stopped exercising, and her landlord Henry is her main source of company although he's increasingly taken up by a new woman.

As I started the book, I didn't expect much. After all, seeing that two characters are going to come into contact in unpleasant ways usually makes for good writing but weak plots. Well, I was wrong. The plot is even stronger than the excellent writing.

In typical Sue Grafton fashion, she brings in touches of the moment, winter 1987, to give the story a strong sense of time. In this case, she employs the fascination with old muscle cars that had developed by then to give a sense of two points in time. I was most impressed by this choice of a story-telling device.

Her sense of place is equally strong. I grew up not far from where "Santa Teresa" is set. In reading this book, I was called back into dark misty nights in that area when threat seemed to lurk in every shadow.

The story is so successful that it reminded me of the Greek tragedies, dressed up on modern circumstances. It's a remarkable accomplishment.

Brava, Ms. Grafton!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars T Is for Tremendously Told Tale, Dec 5 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: T Is For Trespass (Hardcover)
Sue Grafton is always exploring new subjects and new ways of writing for her readers. T is for Trespass continues that worthy heritage for this terrific series.

If you haven't read any books in this series, I suggest you go back and read them in alphabetical order beginning with A is for Alibi. You have a major treat ahead of you. The series develops over a number of years, and many references are clearer throughout if you've read the earlier books.

The writing innovation here is to have two narrators, Kinsey Millhone, and Kinsey's nemesis, named Solana Rojas, whom fate brings together in Kinsey's neighborhood to create a taut suspense story. You will see the future conflict clearly coming, but won't know what to expect. Sue Grafton does a wonderful job of filling the story with lots of surprises to heighten the suspense. The struggle between the two women is intensified by Solana being portrayed from the beginning as being the psychological opposite of Kinsey. You'll enjoy a heightened sense of tension by knowing what the two determined women are thinking about and planning to do.

The new topic is how some people prey on others in particularly chilling ways by taking advantage of the presumption we hold that we are surrounded by trustworthy people. It's a cautionary tale that will leave you wanting to do more to check out those with whom you and your family come into contact. The book is so powerful in this dimension that at times you'll feel like you are reading a nonfiction book about a tragedy.

As the book opens, Solana is looking for opportunity and Kinsey is looking for some work. Solana has just left her last job and explains what her objectives are in Chapter One. Kinsey picks up in Chapter Two to describe how detecting hasn't been very good lately. To make up for that, Kinsey has been serving summonses. Kinsey hears a sound while she's on her way to work, and that sound leads both women onto a collision course.

In the book, Kinsey works on several assignments . . . looking for evidence to clear a defendant in a car accident, assisting a landlord to remove deadbeat tenants, and checking out references for a new employee. She also finds that being a caring neighbor can be time consuming.

Kinsey's personal life is at a low ebb. She's not seeing anyone. She's stopped exercising, and her landlord Henry is her main source of company although he's increasingly taken up by a new woman.

As I started the book, I didn't expect much. After all, seeing that two characters are going to come into contact in unpleasant ways usually makes for good writing but weak plots. Well, I was wrong. The plot is even stronger than the excellent writing.

In typical Sue Grafton fashion, she brings in touches of the moment, winter 1987, to give the story a strong sense of time. In this case, she employs the fascination with old muscle cars that had developed by then to give a sense of two points in time. I was most impressed by this choice of a story-telling device.

Her sense of place is equally strong. I grew up not far from where "Santa Teresa" is set. In reading this book, I was called back into dark misty nights in that area when threat seemed to lurk in every shadow.

The story is so successful that it reminded me of the Greek tragedies, dressed up on modern circumstances. It's a remarkable accomplishment.

Brava, Ms. Grafton!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars frightening mystery, Dec 13 2008
This review is from: T Is For Trespass (Hardcover)
As with pedophiles, fraudsters lull victims with a false sense of security. They groom their victims, slowly taking more and more liberties. Often, grateful seniors offer gifts in return for paid services. This is a huge mistake and changes the boundaries between service provider and care recipient.

This novel is a 'must read' for seniors and caregivers.
I found it both drew me into the text as a mystery, and repelled me as the character took advantage of frail and aging seniors.

As with pedophiles, fraudsters lull victims with a false sense of security. They groom their prey, slowly taking more and more liberties. Often, grateful seniors offer gifts in return for paid services. This is a huge mistake and changes the boundaries between service provider and care recipient.

If you know a frail senior who lives alone, ensure that s/he is provided for!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sue Grafton Right ON Target, Jan. 19 2008
By 
Faye Fitzgibbon "RFB" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: T Is For Trespass (Hardcover)
Sue Grafton plays a P.I. in all of her books and she is amazing. I don't know what I did before she came along. I have read so many different detective stories that it is hard to count them all but this lady has it all tied up in a nice neat package. She really knows how to spin a tale that will have you quaking in you shoes. She is one of the Best. Hurray for Sue G.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointing, Jan. 9 2008
By 
C. Hatch (Vancouver Island) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: T Is For Trespass (Hardcover)
I looked forward to this book but it was not worth the wait. The story itself could have been told in one chapter and the rest was all descriptions of every street, every room and every outfit. The story would have been more interesting without the excessive descriptions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

T is for Trespass
T is for Trespass by Sue Grafton (Paperback - April 3 2012)
CDN$ 16.00 CDN$ 12.80
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews