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4.6 out of 5 stars
A Time to Kill: A Novel
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on March 16, 1998
This is the BEST Grisham book ever. Anyone will love it.
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on May 16, 2015
Excellent read. I would recommend it to anyone!
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on August 28, 2014
Excellent read couldn't put it down
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on April 21, 2015
Typical Grisham. A good read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 11, 2004
Is race a main factor in our courts today? It all depends who you ask. Some people would say race is irrelevant. This book shows how race determines what the outcome in a trial could be.
It all began in Clanton, a small town located in Mississippi. One day a little girl was walking to the store when all a sudden she was jumped by two white men. The men beat and raped her. The girl's name is Tonya and name of the men are Ray Cobb and Pete Willard. The men were about to be tried in court when the girl's father whose name is Carl Lee decided to take revenge. He blasted Cobb and Willard into tiny pieces. Carl Lee hired a lawyer named Jake to defend him in court. Then the town of Clanton became a national spotlight. Hundred of journalists came to Clanton to cover the trial of Carl Lee. Even the KKK returend to Clanton, who were banned from the town 25 years ago. The trial was a long one. To find out if Carl Lee was found guilty or not guilty you have to read the book.
From my perspective, the book is well written thats why it is good. The book is kind of long, but I thought it was worth it. The only problem with the book it lacks interest half way through. The book was so good I even encouraged my sister and brother to read it. I hope you can enjoy the book the same way I did.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 10, 2004
A reasonable case could be made that John Grisham's A Time to Kill is the single most important work of fiction written in the past twenty-five years. It is the stunningly powerful story of one man's moral retribution in the face of a society hell bent on his humiliation, subjugation, and ultimately, his elimination. Carl Lee is a black man in the white-dominated town of Clanton, Mississippi who murders his young daughter's rapists. It is a chilling act of revenge that any father can identify with, even if they don't have the courage to follow through as Carl Lee does.
Jake Brigance plays a small-town street lawyer in the fictional world of Clanton, who takes on Carl Lee as his client. Jake is white. Carl is black. And the town of Clanton operates as a microcosm for all the racial misunderstanding and hatred in the American South.
It is the most compelling American novel about race since Harper Lee's devastating To Kill a Mockingbird, and one can not help but feel some of the emotional resonance of that American classic as it informs an all-new American classic. That John Grisham has been relegated to "popular fiction" status undercuts the power and profound truth in much of his work. Nowhere is that more evident than in A Time To Kill, the purest distillation of racial misunderstanding in an American novel in the latter part of the 20th Century.
Stacey Cochran
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 25, 2004
The classic John Grisham novel, A Time to Kill, is a transfixing story of the violent effects of racism in the deep south. Carl Lee Hailey is a southern, black man, whose daughter was beaten and raped by two racist hillbillies. He extracts his revenge through another act of brutality as he guns down the two rapists in front of hundreds of witnesses. In an attempt to free himself from a fate of prison or death, attorney Jake Brigance brings forth his efforts to help the apparently doomed man.
This was a very graphic and powerful story. Grisham focuses on the racial inequality to show how a black man in that situation would be treated. The events throughout the entire story, show the anger of the man whose family was shattered by ignorance. I believe that the best feature is the intense detail. Although at times a bit gruesome, the writing can truly make you feel engrossed in the story along with the characters.
There are plot twists concealed in the midst of what would appear to be a straight-forward story line, which prove to make things a great deal more interesting than merely providing a predictable set of events to thumb through. The book is severely hard to put down due to the
If there are any flaws they are well disguised. The only detail to be considered a flaw is that while Carl Lee murdered two men in his state of rage. Anyone with a family member forced to endure such an inhumane experience, would probably feel this way as well. Though his feelings toward those men were comprehensible, did they bestow a right to take their lives? This is the primary focus of the story line; however, the fact that Carl Lee was black makes you wonder if he was white, would the murders have even been an issue. Overall, the story was good and the writing was amazing. I would recommend this book to anyone!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on August 16, 2000
"A Time to Kill" is not only poorly written, like most of Grisham's stuff, but it is sick and entertains dangerous notions as well. The action hinges on the a father taking revenge after his preteen daughter is raped. This is a disgusting enough theme, but then the reader is made to believe that such vigilantism is not only justified but perfectly acceptable! At the end of the book, a court ruling is made based on the threat of mob violence. If that isn't enough to chill your blood, all of this is in service of a weak story with cliche characters and an overall lack of imagination that is startling. The reviewer below says reading this book is better than watching television. Much as I love books, I respectfully disagree. Most television shows don't insult the intelligence nearly as badly as this does.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Okay. Where do I begin? There are so many things wrong with this book. Grisham spends a great deal of time in this courtroom drama dealing with the protaganist's theory of defense in a criminal case. In the end, the theory of defense turns out to be irrelevant -- so the bulk of the book is irrelevant. Grisham introduces characters who are ultimately inconsequential. I kept waiting for the main character's law student sidekick to do something to justify her inculsion. In the end, she comes and goes without doing anything of significance. She could have been cut out of the book without the least impact on the story. If you distilled this book to its essence, you'd end up with nothing. Skip this book; your time would be better spent reading the label on a tube of toothpaste.
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on July 5, 2014
Interesting book
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