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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting experiment (look up Rodger W. Young) on the net.
As with any good sci-fi the story and descriptions of the latest gadget are important; however this is just the window dressing or vehicle to carry a message or concept to you with out sounding too preachy.

Basically this book is not fascist like the movie. It suggests that people should be responsible for their actions and have a stake in what they make...
Published on Oct. 2 2006 by bernie

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars STARSHIP TROOPERS
Less a slam-bang action-fest than a gutsy personal analysis of what makes for a realistic and attainable utopia, Heinlein's "Starship Troopers" fails to achieve great heights not because of the author's political agenda (the reason this book is continually labelled controversial), but simply due to poor pacing and a less than fully developed plot.
Told from...
Published on Aug. 22 2002 by K. Jump


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting experiment (look up Rodger W. Young) on the net., Oct. 2 2006
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Starship Troopers (Paperback)
As with any good sci-fi the story and descriptions of the latest gadget are important; however this is just the window dressing or vehicle to carry a message or concept to you with out sounding too preachy.

Basically this book is not fascist like the movie. It suggests that people should be responsible for their actions and have a stake in what they make decisions on. Never did it say that these people were smarter or better, just that when you have a vested interest your decisions tend to work or you will pay.

I was intrigued in the process that Johnny Rico was going through in the story. The movie does not phase me as it looks like cartoon hype. But the book was too close to home. I hope my memory is flawed as I remember every one of the people types that he described. Actually I think with the volunteer Army today it is closer to the book than was Vietnam where conscripts looked on it this as slightly preferable to prison. I know that this story is not about the military but it is too real to be ignored as just the story.

You could have floored me with I found out there were no naked women in the book. Dizzy Flores must have had a great Swedish doctor. This could have been a genuine attempt to update the story; however it distracted from the original purpose.

Basically after school Johnny Rico is whisked into the military by peer pressure and to finds out if he is more than just the factory owner's son. While going through boot camp he learns of different cultures and the intricacies of military life. Naturally he makes mistakes and learns from others mistakes. As he grows he learns what make the world the way it is. I will not contrast this book with the movie because I think you enjoy the story more if you find out what happens as it unfolds.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just scratches the surface..., May 15 2004
By 
Amazon Customer "mjaplin" (Houston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
I thought this book was a little superficial in its treatment of the "Hero" archetype. Contrary to the first reviewer I would say that this book is anything but rational. The archetypes and myths employed in this book have been examined much more closely by non-fiction authors such as Joseph Campbell, Jung and Freud. Heinlein has just taken an old myth and covered it with a sci-fi veneer. Nevertheless, it is entertaining.
For those of you with honorable tendencies I recommend "Meditations" by Marcus Aurelius. Aurelius recorded the thoughts collected in this book while on campaign with the Roman legions. He was also emperor at the time. His ideas are morally courageous, well thought and grounded in practical experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the Movie, April 11 2004
By 
Cas "castropanopanopalis" (Where ever the Army sends me) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Starship Troopers (Audio Cassette)
I must admit that I did not get around to reading this book until after I'd seen the movie. I liked the movie, and so I figured "why not read the book" well... the Book, aside form being dang near a compleatly diffrent story from the movie, was, in my humble oppinion, way better. I am a big fan of the war based sience fiction type books.
I think the Bigest thing that Cought on me about this book was that its not telling the story about a guy that joins the millitary, and goes off to fight some aliens, It's telling you a story about how joining the millitary and going off to fight some aliens has changed from a once dumb civilian, into a soldier, and a citizen. It's about how Juan Rico, evolves from a boy to a man, and from a follower into a leader.

I particularly liked the use of technology, and how for as cool as it is, it's not even an issue in the book. The book didn't get all carried away with fancy weapons and armor, but instead gave you a basic outline and let your own imagination fill in the rest.
There were a lot of Socialistic idiologies, in this book, but I still liked how their govenment was set up, and I think it's too bad we couldn't make a system like that work in today's sociaty.
It's definatly a deep read, with a lot of questions that you may find you ask yourself, but that's part of the joy I found in reading it. so if your looking for some straight "balls to the walls" action like you saw in the movie, this might not be your book, but if your in for some real Sci-Fi that'll keep you woundering what'll happen next, and just who Rico will become in the end, this is your meal ticket!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars STARSHIP TROOPERS, Aug. 22 2002
By 
K. Jump (Corbin, KY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Less a slam-bang action-fest than a gutsy personal analysis of what makes for a realistic and attainable utopia, Heinlein's "Starship Troopers" fails to achieve great heights not because of the author's political agenda (the reason this book is continually labelled controversial), but simply due to poor pacing and a less than fully developed plot.
Told from the perspective of Juan Rico, one of the Terran Federation's armored Mobile Infantrymen, Heinlein's novel follows Rico's journey from listless graduate to raw recruit to battle-hardened warrior. Along the way we are treated to numerous socio-political asides on why the story's right-wing form of government works and why previous ones failed. Rico's military training is explored in convincing detail, and is in fact the backbone of the book.
Therein is some of the problem--Heinlein's never-ending seminars tend to get repetitive toward the end of the book, and Rico himself seems to run out of anything new to say. Other characters, including Rico's would-be sweetheart, Carmen, are barely developed and are only rarely shown interracting with the narrator. Moreover, despite its billing as a first-rate adventure yarn, there are only a few battle scenes and what we do get are over quickly and often only vaguely described--except for the opening scene, easily the most exciting part of the book and after which everything else is a slow letdown.
None of which makes "Starship Troopers" a bad book. The military and political evaluations are genuinely interesting FOR AWHILE and the whole is leavened with Heinlein's inimitable quirky sense of humor. If only Heinlein had developed the plot and its characters a bit more, this would have been a truly fine novel. As it is, it's still worth a look as long as you know what to expect: this is a political commentary, not sci-fi excitement. At the very least, it's better than the movie.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Johnny Goes Marching, Dec 21 2013
By 
John M. Ford "johnDC" (near DC, MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Starship Troopers (Kindle Edition)
Juan Rico graduates from high school and goes off to war, where he learns how to fight, sees some of his friends get killed, and finds out that his high school history teacher was right about life and responsibility. Sounds like a cliché WWII movie, doesn’t it? Many of the ideas came from that war and the author’s experiences in the U.S. Navy. But he used those experiences to write science fiction instead of historical fiction.

The enemy in this book are the Bugs, ferocious aliens from outside of our solar system who open hostilities by nuking a few of Earth’s major cities. (Including Juan’s home town.) Learning to fight requires operating a highly automated and nearly autonomous spacesuit and numerous beam, projectile, and hand weapons. Juan’s reflections on the lessons of his teacher, a combat veteran, provide a forum for Heinlein to lecture the reader about self-reliance, responsibility, and citizenship.

This is a representative Heinlein juvenile science fiction novel. Everything from the action to the politics fits the bill. The technology has aged well and the politics… well, readers will have to decide that issue for themselves. It’s worth reading.

Do NOT confuse this book with the very shallow and stupid movie of the same name. Don’t see that movie, either. Read the book instead.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great story, Nov. 1 2013
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I was pleasantly surprised by how great the story was. I could not put it down once I started reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars MI, Oct. 17 2013
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I am reading this now. I bought a set of futuristic books for my sons to read but since they didn't jump on iy I took this one up and anyone that has spent time in a boot camp will be able to relate to this regardless. It is an enjoyable read
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Work - Not Like The Movie, April 18 2011
By 
IDGS (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
As I'm sure you've seen in other reviews - if you're looking for a novelization of the movie, look elsewhere. Starship Troopers is not an out and out action novel, and cannot be compared to the film version.

However, if you're looking for an interesting examination of military training, doctine, and an overall critical lens on society - this may be for you.

First off, there isn't a lot of action in this novel. The battle scenes are highly glossed over, with an entire assault often condensed to a short paragraph, with pages upon pages of reflection on the events afterwards. The narrative follows Rico, a young soldier with the International Force who fights to become more than a mere bootsrap cadet. We witness his journey from lowly trainee private, into Mobile Infantry training, through into his training to become an officer. This is much more about his internal struggle to come to terms with what it means to be a solider - lessons that can easily be translated into today's society, taken from this future feudalistic world.

More interestingly, this text offers a critical view of today's policy-makers, and the possible reprocussions of our failed attempts to control crime and war. There are some important case studies here - albeit, fictional - but then again, so was Plato's philosophical work, such as The Allegory of the Cave.

At the end of the day, if you want an intellectually-tickling read, check this out. If you want guns, babes and blood - keep looking, because there's more than enough stuff out there to whet your appetite.

Overall, 5/5.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Action-packed and thought-provoking reading, Nov. 12 2002
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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For me, Starship Troopers is all the proof you need in order to name Robert Heinlein science fiction's greatest writer. I am getting in the bad habit of naming specific Heinlein books to be his very best, only to find that the next novel I pick up is even better than the last one. This particular novel is fascinating on a number of levels. There is nothing really special about Johnnie Rico; he's a normal lad who decides to join the military, ostensibly at the time in order to gain citizenship. In this future Terran confederation, only those who serve in the military are awarded citizenship and granted the privilege to vote. The government actually discourages volunteers and makes boot camp so difficult that only men with proper soldier qualities get through it. On the broadest level, we see Rico's progression from harrowed recruit to active service in the Mobile Infantry to combat against the Klendathu. I have no military background at all, but I found Heinlein's descriptions of military life and actual combat to be detailed and thrilling. We watch Johnnie Rico become a soldier. Along the way, he figures out why he actually did volunteer, developing a whole new outlook on duty and responsibility.
I don't want to delve too deeply into the politics of this novel. Some have pinned a fascist connotation on it, but I try to examine this future society philosophically. Only those who serve in the military can vote, but the vast majority of people choose not to serve and live happy lives as civilians, so I don't see anything fascist about this society. What intrigues me most, and it is this that sets this book apart from the vast majority of science fiction, is Heinlein's thought-provoking ideas about ethics, morality, duty, responsibility, etc. Mr. Dubois, Ricco's high school instructor in History and Moral Philosophy (a required course for all) gets in the ring and dukes it out with Plato, John Locke, and a host of other political thinkers. He argues that man has no natural moral instinct; morality is acquired by the individual and is an elaboration of the instinct to survive. If an individual is not taught the lessons of living in society, he will not learn that the basis of all morality is duty. In this way he criticizes the democracies of the late twentieth century and explains their ultimate failure. The promotion of the idea that certain natural rights are necessarily due each person caused young people to neglect their duties--by concentrating on the rights they think are due them. Liberty and freedom must be earned and paid for, and democracies failed because they did not understand this basic tenet. These kinds of ideas are the source of most of the criticisms directed toward Starship Troopers. I found many cogent arguments in the novel; criticism of democracy is not an endorsement of totalitarianism. Many would agree with some of the ideas Mr. Dubois puts forth (and which find their way into various places elsewhere in the book), but any agreement or disagreement should be purely intellectual. Great fiction is supposed to make us think deeply about important concepts, and Starship Troopers succeeds admirably in that regard.
Thus, Starship Troopers provides science fiction fans the best of both worlds. On the one hand, we have the well-told, gripping story of one man's military journey from boot camp to battlefields of war light years away from home, replete with several intense combat scenes. On the other hand, we have ideas of a political and philosophical nature laid out extremely well by the author, which is all but guaranteed to make you seriously think about society, government, and warfare. In the end, duty and responsibility are stressed if not glorified, and I find nothing at all subversive in that. Heinlein tells a fascinating story, and he makes you think, whether you want to or not. Few are the writers who can claim such lofty credentials.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A poor man's "Forever War", July 23 2000
By 
Steve Herr (Jackson, MI USA) - See all my reviews
I received the book while participating in a book swap years ago, but never got around to reading it, although I was familiar with other books by Heinlein. When I saw the movie, I thought, "Yep. This is one of Heinlein's stories." I dug out the book, and was very disappointed. It is a pretty good book in its own right, but having read "The Forever War" by Joe Haldeman previously - and considering it one of my all-time favorites - I felt this pales by comparison.
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Starship Troopers
Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein (Paperback - June 27 2006)
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