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5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book!
I loved this book! I had not read any of the collaborations of Preston and Child previous to this book. I am so glad I gave their writing a chance.

When a New York City construction crew unearths a tunnel filled with thirty-seven victims of a late-nineteenth century killer, FBI Special Agent Pendergast approaches Nora Kelly, an archaeologist at the New York...
Published on Feb. 1 2012 by Jodi Chapters

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but ultimately disappointing
this book had a lot going for it: interesting characters, wonderful and vivid descriptions of victorian new york, and an intriguing look at the resources of museums...but ultimately it sinks under the weight of a few outlandish plot twists and an anticlimactic (and generally predictable) ending.
All in all, a good beach read (and a good jumping off point for learning...
Published on June 14 2004 by C. K. Mavromatis


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5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book!, Feb. 1 2012
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
I loved this book! I had not read any of the collaborations of Preston and Child previous to this book. I am so glad I gave their writing a chance.

When a New York City construction crew unearths a tunnel filled with thirty-seven victims of a late-nineteenth century killer, FBI Special Agent Pendergast approaches Nora Kelly, an archaeologist at the New York Museum of Natural History, to ask her help in examining the site before the powerful company building on the land can rebury the bones.

Kelly and Pendergast determine that the victims were surgically dissected while still alive, and the bodies sealed in what was once the basement of a museum called "Shottum's Cabinet of Natural Productions and Curiosities." Pendergast is interested in the one hundred-year-old murders for reasons of his own, but as he and Kelly begin their research, a present-day serial killer commits the first of several homicides identical to those found in Shottum's Cabinet. Kelly shares her findings with her on and off again boyfriend New York Times reporter Bill Smithback, and together with Pendergast they race to stop a nineteenth century killer who is apparently still at work.

Preston and Child pool together their similar writing skills in a story that has you on the edge of your seat. I give it two thumbs up. You definitely won't want to put this one down.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best audiobooks ever, Oct. 17 2003
Before I get into the review, I have to say that this is one of the best books I've listened to yet.
When I first saw two authors in the credits, I thought it was going to stink, especially since I've
never read anything by either of them before. And Rene Auberjonois isn't exactly the type of
person I thought would read a book well. But I was desperate for a book to listen to on one of my
trips and downloaded this from Audible.com, then crossed my fingers.
I soon uncrossed them after the first few minutes. Flipping between the late 19th century and
present day, the reader learns about cabinets of curiosities, basically mini-"museums" set up in
New York City by collector of oddities. There were actually quite a few in those days.
Then it's present day and at a construction site, all work has stopped. In the basement of an old
apartment building being razed, an underground charnel house is discovered. Bones of 36 murder
victims from the late 1800s are found in little alcoves in the charnel house, some with clothing
and hair still attached. Archaeologist Nora Kelly is called in from the Museum of Natural History
by an FBI Agent by the name of Pendergast (no first name). She can't figure out why she's there,
but looks at the remains and finds herself embroiled in a battle of the FBI versus local cops when
the owner of the property tries to get them kicked out. Nora pockets some of the things she finds
on one body, tucking them in her clothes.
It turns out these were victims of a serial killer in what was then known as the Five Points
neighborhood in the late 1880s. Nora's love interest, William Smithback, is a freelance
journalist, and smells a story. When she and Pendergast discover some incriminating evidence
about the murders, she entrusts a diary to William and he ends up writing an article, blowing the
whole story, but tying them into some murders that had already been going on recently.
No one believes the serial killer could possible still be alive, but it's obvious the copycat is good,
too good, because the victim's spinal cords have been ripped out in the same way. Yes, I wrote
ripped out. Ee-yew.
Pendergast and Nora use the clues from the diary and trace a possible lab back to what is now
Chinatown and discover the lab in an underground chamber. The owner of that lab had been
looking for the answer to eternal life and thought spinal cords were the answer. Racing to try to
find out who the present-day serial killer could be, and scared at who they think he may be,
Pendergast and Nora race to a long-abandoned mansion, only to find that William was already
there and his back isn't looking too good.
The most intriguing part of this book was when Pendergast would "meditate" and take himself
back to the 1880s. I mean, really take himself back there. It was weird, but it fit in with the story
and sure as heck surprised me. Nora isn't a gung ho heroine, but she's not wimp, either. William,
her erstwhile lover/boyfriend, is just bumbling enough that you want her to get rid of him, but
endearing enough, you want her to hang onto him. Pendergast is not your typical FBI agent, nor
is he like Mulder in the X-Files. And the killer, phew, wait until you see who he is.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Cabinet of Curiosities, July 2 2011
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This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
I realy enjoyed the book. It's well written and keeps you wanting to get through the book to the end.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not my favorite, July 15 2004
By 
BRANDIE DOSSETT "bdossett2" (KNOXVILLE, TN United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
I have read many of the Preston/Child books with this one being the least impressive. This book provides plenty of suspense, however I felt let down by the ending. If you would like to read a good book by these guys then read either Relic or Thunderhead(my favorite) you won't be dissappointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read It!, July 8 2004
By 
Amy Foster (Vancouver, WA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
Excellent thriller. A cross between Michael Crichton and Stephen King. I borrowed this book from my grandmother and was hooked from page 1. Just the right mix of horror, suspense, and mystery. If you love psychological thrillers, this book is for you. This was the first Preston-Child book I read, but it won't be the last!
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2.0 out of 5 stars A Thrilling Ride to Tedium, June 22 2004
By 
Douglas A. Haldane "Reader" (Houston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
A gangbusters beginning plot that carries the interest through most of the book, but then gets mired down in some pretty good writing that simply goes on, and on, and on, and on -- to no apparent purpose.
I'll not repeat the theme of the book. That's well handled by others. I like the story; I just wish the authors would tell it.
If you have found the formula for prolonging your life, you may wish to spend time with this novel. Otherwise, life's too short.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but ultimately disappointing, June 14 2004
By 
C. K. Mavromatis "kallym" (Akron, OH USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
this book had a lot going for it: interesting characters, wonderful and vivid descriptions of victorian new york, and an intriguing look at the resources of museums...but ultimately it sinks under the weight of a few outlandish plot twists and an anticlimactic (and generally predictable) ending.
All in all, a good beach read (and a good jumping off point for learning more about history and new york).
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5.0 out of 5 stars You won't be able to put this one down!, June 2 2004
By 
Ex-CSI (Lancaster, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
Forget making any plans-schedule absolutely nothing! You will not be able to put this down! Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child have created another page turner with the return of FBI Agent Pendergast (Relic) and Dr. Nora Kelly and Bill Smithback (Thunderhead). As a former crime scene technician and archeology nut I found this book to be well written and one hell of a fun read. If you want thrills and chills this is the book for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Best. Period., April 15 2004
By 
M. TURNER "zenresistance" (Los Estados Unidos) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
This book would be a bargain at twice the price. I could tell some one what was going on relatively early, but it made no difference, no difference at all. If I had to say which fiction book I've read is the best one ever, I'd say this one. This is Preston's and Childs' greatest work to date.
It is a masterpiece. There are no ifs, ands, or buts about it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good story for "C.S.I." and "Crossing Jordan" fans, April 11 2004
By 
This review is from: The Cabinet of Curiosities (Mass Market Paperback)
I listened to the audiobook of "Cabinet of Curiosities" especting it to be a disappointment. I was happily surprised to find it an interesting story that kept my attention. Usually I save audiobooks for time spent working out, but found myself sneaking a listen on other occasions. I enjoyed this book so much that I'm buying the paperback for my husband to read. Although this book does not have as much detailed forensics in it, if you like television shows like "C.S.I." and "Crossing Jordan" you will enjoy this book.
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The Cabinet of Curiosities
The Cabinet of Curiosities by Lincoln Child (Mass Market Paperback - May 27 2003)
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