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5.0 out of 5 stars A different spies story
This book is a book of english spies in the early 1800 in France, but is different because the book tells us the personal problems of the spies (of course including a love story) instead of how they do their work or who they are spying, as a matter of fact their work is taken as a second story of the book, it is interesting knowing how a spy do one thing for his country...
Published on July 15 2002 by Jorge Frid

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3.0 out of 5 stars A let down compared to THUNDER AND ROSES
If you came to this book, after reading THUNDER AND ROSES (the story of Nicholas and Clare) and THE BARGAIN (the rewrite of THE WOULD-BE WIDOW) in which Rafe, Duke of Candover plays an important part, you will find this book to be a let-down in many ways. I suppose it is hard to satisfy all persons, and much in the way that many Jo Beverley fans felt let down by...
Published on Aug. 20 2001 by bookjunkiereviews


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4.0 out of 5 stars Good Mystery... Not as Romantic as Others, Aug. 6 2002
By 
Beth Jones Henkel (St. Louis MO) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Petals in the Storm comes as the second in the Fallen Angel Series. If you pay attention to the time line though, these books are not really in chronological order. Rafe, the Duke of Candover and the oldest of the Fallen Angels, fell in love right out of school. However, this young man that always was an aristocrat and rarely showed weakness let his pride and anger ruin his chances with the girl. When a mission takes him to Paris, much to his surprise his contact turns out to be the girl only she's now in disguise and one of the best spies for England. Margot Ashton is not the same girl that Rafe fell in love with. She has known excrutiating pain at the hands of men and only trusts one man explicitly... Robin, her protector of many years. As Rafe works through his feelings, his jealousy grows towards Robin and his fear for Margot in this dangerous masquerade begins to consume him. In the end, Rafe, Margot and Robin face their greatest enemy together and find an unlikely alliance that leads Margot and Rafe to the love they denied so many years ago. It's worth having for the bookshelf. It's more whodunit than romance. The sensuality is not really there like in Thunder and Roses. But it's still a good read and I really liked Rafe from his other roles in the Bargain and Thunder and Roses.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A different spies story, July 15 2002
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This book is a book of english spies in the early 1800 in France, but is different because the book tells us the personal problems of the spies (of course including a love story) instead of how they do their work or who they are spying, as a matter of fact their work is taken as a second story of the book, it is interesting knowing how a spy do one thing for his country when he really wants to do another thing.
Is a nice and easy story that will relax you while you read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An intelligent heroine chooses a jerk? Who would think?, March 23 2002
By 
Lighthouse Ann (Baltimore, MD USA) - See all my reviews
Alright, I confess I had a great time with this book. It's extraordinary to read a romance with plot beyond the love story. Our lady hero, the spy, manages to save the world. Our author also manages to sneak in several warm messages of a woman's resilience and ingenuity.
Unfortunately, I could never quite come around to the hero after seeing him in all his wondrous arrogance and self-centeredness. It was a little like watching a romantic movie when there's no chemistry between the two lead actors.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A let down compared to THUNDER AND ROSES, Aug. 20 2001
If you came to this book, after reading THUNDER AND ROSES (the story of Nicholas and Clare) and THE BARGAIN (the rewrite of THE WOULD-BE WIDOW) in which Rafe, Duke of Candover plays an important part, you will find this book to be a let-down in many ways. I suppose it is hard to satisfy all persons, and much in the way that many Jo Beverley fans felt let down by Rothgar's own book (DEVILISH), many of Putney's fans felt disappointed by this book. Why? Well, the Duke of Candover somehow does not seem the same man that he appeared to be in the other books. The heroine is certainly right for him, but unfortunately there are two problems. For one, the political/intrigue part of the story is so strong that it completely overwhelms the romance, both in terms of space allotted in the book and in terms of interest level. Quite frankly, I spent more time trying to follow who was duping whom, rather than worrying about the love triangle in this book. Which brings us to the second problem. The love triangle. Is Margot really in love with Robin and he with her? Why does Robin get such a major part in this story? Yes, he is an interesting character (and I look forward to reading his own story ANGEL ROGUE). But alloting so much time to him and his complicated relationship with Margot means all the less time spent on the relationship between Margot and Rafe.
Like another reviewer, I have no doubt that she chose the right man. I only wish that the book had been more about the couple. I also wondered how their love as teenagers (virtually) was sustained well into adulthood. I find the theme of separated young lovers sometimes hard to believe, given that people change over time. If Rafe and Margot had been allowed more time together in the story, this theme could have been developed more - especially how Rafe adjusted to the new Margot, and not just her "dark secrets>"
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3.0 out of 5 stars She chose the wrong man., June 23 2001
By 
mys_reader "mys_reader" (Fort Worth, TX United States) - See all my reviews
Well, I must say, this is not one of MJP's better books. The hero is a jerk throughout the majority of the book, and when he finally discovers how wrong and stupid he had been, it is a little too late for me. Thirteen years too late.
As a 21-year-old boy, Rafe falls in love with the beautiful Margot. Eyes meeting across the room, two hearts beating as one, etc. Then a man of his crowd, (Oliver), someone he barely knows, someone he characterizes as an "oaf" boasts that she had sex with him. Never mind that Oliver is not a friend of Rafe's. Never mind that Rafe is supposedly sooo much in love with Margot. He just assumes that this woman he loves is a ... (After all, Oliver went to Eton! He is of the nobility! Such a man would never lie! She must be a harlot!) So Our Hero rushes off to accuse the woman he loves of being a ..., she throws his ring back in his face, and leaves.
Thirteen years later. Rafe has turned into a rake who beds every woman he can get his hands on, even if they are married. (But that is all right, he had a disappointment in love, so he can be as sluttish as he wants) Going to Paris to work for England (Although what qualifications does he have, besides jumping the bones of every wife in the foreign service is never made clear) He meets... you guessed it. Margot.
Well, he immediately has two goals: to prove her a spy and a traitor, and to get her into bed. She is, after all, a ... She has been living on her own for years in France.
One thing that disturbs me about this "tormented" hero is the fact that he is so bitter and angry about something that happened THIRTEEN years ago. His malevolence towards Margot is nauseating. Even if he had good reason to think the worst of her (he didn't), he should have gotten over it after more than a decade.
And how does he finally discover the truth? Another man reveals to him that good 'ole Oliver is a traitor. ONLY THEN does he realize that a nobleman can (gasp!) lie.
I mean, it's hysterical. Rafe lives in a society of hypocricy, casual adultery, and promiscuity, but can't get it through his head that a man who has a title could LIE. ("Now, really. Oliver is a boor and an oaf, and he beats his wife, but do you expect me to believe that he would lie about a beautiful woman having sex with him?") No, it is much more logical that your fiance is a harlot than to believe that a man would lie about his conquests.
The fact that he convicted her on nothing more than the "confession" of a man that he KNOWS is a boor and an oaf (HIS description of the "honest gentleman" who Margot supposedly cuckolded him with) is bad enough. The fact that he uses his long-ago heartbreak as an excuse to behave like a ... himself is the worst part.
I have to tell you, the scene where he discovers exactly what the consequences of his actions were (and they were awful) is the best part for me. While he was cavorting with married women, Margot was... well, read the book. Rafe did not grovel nearly enough for me to forgive him.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining yet disapointing., May 27 2001
By 
K. Lee "kd829" (California, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I finally finished the Fallen Angel series. I purposely read them slightly out of order just to save Rafe for last. He is mentioned in all the other angel series with smaller roles and I just could not wait to find out about him. My greatest disapointment was the lack of background, in many of Ms Putneys other series you get atleast 1 chapter or maybe a few pages of background or "flashback" to the hero/heroines past. I basically learned nothing (in the few paragraphs written) of what made Rafe "Rafe". He is painted to be a very easily led if not somewhat naive person. Maggie/Margot is a believeable character based on her past experiences. I thought that there were too many other characters holding starring roles towards the end of the story that at times it was confusing as to who they were and why they appear in the story. I skipped over many paragraphs in order to hurry up and get to the point and bring this book to an end. If you have not yet read the angel series, I suggest reading Rafe's story first to get it out of the way, it will not "ruin" the plots and twists of the other storys. It actually gives you a better understanding of the roles all of the others played in the war.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fallen-Angels Series: Action-Packed Excitement!, May 17 2001
By A Customer
I couldn't put it down, I read it so fast! It's full of mystery and adventure- my kind of entertainment!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not quite what I'd hoped for, July 6 2000
By 
Dr W. Richards "wmr-uk" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the second of the Fallen Angels series in order of writing, though chronologically it occurs later than a couple of its successors. This is Rafe's story, and it is a book I've been waiting to read ever since I read The Bargain (the end of The Bargain is reprised from Rafe's point of view at the beginning of this book). In The Bargain, Rafe was presented as a cynical rake with shadows in his past, and I was really looking forward to learning more about him, particularly after meeting him again in Thunder and Roses.
I was a little disappointed in this book, however. Rafe shares the limelight here with Robin, the hero of Angel Rogue, and as such we don't learn as much about him as we would like. Minor characters also occupy far more of a centre-stage role in this book than in other Putney novels, to the point of having entire scenes written from their point of view, for example.
Maggie, or Margot, is a fascinating heroine, and I enjoyed her relationship with both Robin and Rafe - and yes, she did choose the right man!
But I had wanted so much to get to know Rafe properly, and - particularly after reading Thunder and Roses, which is just *so* good - I found this book ultimately a bit unsatisfying. I will no doubt read it again, but by no means as often as I'd re-read Thunder and Roses and The Rake.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Hard to Finish..., June 16 2000
By 
Annie (Pearl River, NY United States) - See all my reviews
The only character I even liked in this never ending book, wasRobin. Our two "romantic" figures, Maggie and Rafe, by page140, have kissed heavily several times yet each time she pulls back and say "no"! What was the point? She was no maiden. It was a bore. And when Rafe suspects Robin of spying, I was ready to throw in the towel and skim to the end of the book. But I didn't and should have. All this hand gripping and fury with one another laced with latent desire was way overplayed. There was not one line of humor in the book. Passion was negligible because Maggie and Rafe acted so silly. Too many pointless starts and stops don't necessarily add passion or interest, but create an aura of stuipdity and disinterest! I had read The Rake, which I enjoyed and then Robin's story, which was okay. Maybe Ms. Putney does not realize that passion does include humor and also, believe it or not, compatibility. Nothing wrong with having some nice qualities in a hero or heroine! Rafe can take his "Duke's stare" - I prefer Robin! Have to wonder about Maggie letting him out of her bed. Don't bother with this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book was GOOD., Oct. 11 1999
By A Customer
Contrary to what the person below said, this book had a lot "of intrigue and suspense, and of course, passion and tension and humour." Saying there was a lack of all of the above makes me want to ask, "Did you READ THE BOOK?"
The book was really good, and it kept me interested all the way through. Rafe, the main character had to share the spotlight with another handsome, dashing fellow.. Robin Andreville (who has his own story in Angel Rogue). I liked Robin a lot. Very honorable, amiable guy. And I felt closer to him than Rafe... which is the wrinkle I find with Petals in the Storm. Though I love this book, and I would have to say is one of the better Fallen Angel Series (and trust me, all were exceptional!), I walked away from it not truly knowing Rafe as well as I feel I know the other Fallen Angels. I don't know.. was it because Rafe had the least demons among all of them? He makes appearances here and there in the other books, but he's not as distinct as Nicholas, Michael, or Lucien. The most distinguishing factor about him is his "Duke stare" and that's it. I want to know MORE of him, but alas, his story is over.. and a good story at that.. very suspenseful. Highly recommended! Hopefully it gets back on print so I could get a copy!
Suggestion: Have Rafe make a larger appearance in some new book...like Nicholas' role in Shattered Rainbows... something that would give more windows into Rafe's character.
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Petals In The Storm
Petals In The Storm by Mary Putney (Mass Market Paperback - June 6 2006)
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