Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Amazingly fresh.
Things in the science-fiction world haven't moved on much since 1895, with respect to Science Fiction and its love affair with time travel and the paradoxes thereof. I suppose this is because the Time Machine by H. G. Wells is very much a philosophical piece on the nature of man and abstracts to do with multidimensionality, more so than any technology to do with time...
Published on Feb. 17 2003 by S Smyth

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Very weak protagonist....
While I commend both HG Wells and Jules Verne for creating a new fictional genre that has proven itself to be highly prophetic, there is a major problem with this fictional selection. The story, in itself, is very gripping and the futuristic rides of our 'hero' are very revealing. In the first case the human population has evolved into two distinct species, one of which...
Published on Oct. 27 2011 by Ronald W. Maron


Most Helpful First | Newest First

3.0 out of 5 stars Very weak protagonist...., Oct. 27 2011
By 
Ronald W. Maron "pilgrim" (Nova Scotia) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Time Machine (Mass Market Paperback)
While I commend both HG Wells and Jules Verne for creating a new fictional genre that has proven itself to be highly prophetic, there is a major problem with this fictional selection. The story, in itself, is very gripping and the futuristic rides of our 'hero' are very revealing. In the first case the human population has evolved into two distinct species, one of which is blandly placid the other of which has adapted solely for the sake of its own survival. The second journey takes us to the era where the sun is decaying and the earth, in turn, has devolved back into its initial beginnings of the evolutionary process.

That being said, the problem with this novel lies in its protagonist. In order for a fictional tale to be successful the 'hero' is depicted as one who we, the reader, can easily identify with or is so extreme from our manner of thought that we are entranced with his opposing personae. The nameless time traveler of 'The Time Machine' is neither. He is depicted as being one of the most cowardly, whiney and purposeless characters imaginable. Most of the time he is nearing a fainting spell or nausea, he lacks any common sense planning abilities or he simply sits around feeling sorry for himself. While I realize that laboratory scientists are not the most 'manly' creatures we find in nature, I have experienced three year olds who were more rationally centered than this character!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Amazingly fresh., Feb. 17 2003
By 
S Smyth (Belfast, Co Antrim United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Time Machine (Mass Market Paperback)
Things in the science-fiction world haven't moved on much since 1895, with respect to Science Fiction and its love affair with time travel and the paradoxes thereof. I suppose this is because the Time Machine by H. G. Wells is very much a philosophical piece on the nature of man and abstracts to do with multidimensionality, more so than any technology to do with time travel.
I was surprised at some of the ideas put forward at the beginning of the book, one of which postulated that time could be a state of mind as much as anything. Something along the lines of Groundhog Day, with only a possible glimmer of memory as indication of what might be happening. A notion given a touch of reinforcement at the end of the book where the Time Traveller finds himself forgetting details of where he's been in the future because of the intrusion of his normal surroundings and associations. The white flowers given to him by Weena, acting as a mnemonic jolt.
This is more a novelette, than a novel. Even so, it does tend to get on its soapbox on occasion, instead of keeping a tidier eye on a few odds-and-ends details as would have been more appropriate.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Time Machine
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells (Mass Market Paperback - Oct. 1 2002)
CDN$ 4.50 CDN$ 4.28
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews