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5.0 out of 5 stars Listening to industry??
Years ago, we watched, through blurred vison, Peter Sellers in Doctor Strangelove. The blurring was either from the hilarity or the grief the film inspired. The dialogue could double us over with mirth, while the story directly confronted us with our mortality and that control of our fate resided with such devious leaders. Greg Palast evokes an identical response. He...
Published on Sept. 3 2002 by Stephen A. Haines

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good points, egotistic reporting!
Let us not kid ourselves, Palast is a braggard. Some of his facts, I've found, are erroneous and/or subjective. Sure, the democratic deblacle of the Florida 2K shennenigan was an era-marking issue, and his reporting was good, but his writing about HIS OWN reporting was just too much for me!
Chapter 1 and 2 are unreadable; he talks more about his abilities as a...
Published on Dec 8 2003 by Relentless


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5.0 out of 5 stars Listening to industry??, Sept. 3 2002
By 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Years ago, we watched, through blurred vison, Peter Sellers in Doctor Strangelove. The blurring was either from the hilarity or the grief the film inspired. The dialogue could double us over with mirth, while the story directly confronted us with our mortality and that control of our fate resided with such devious leaders. Greg Palast evokes an identical response. He chronicles the stolen election of the world´¿s most powerful leader, how the International Monetary Fund and World Band exercise immense control over national destinies, and how the rich increase their influence and income at our expence. He keeps us charmed with his wit, while reminding us of our near-helplessness in the face of mighty, but hidden, forces.
Every essay in this collection jolts the reader. It´¿s like turning over a rock or breaking open a rotten log - the ugly grubs exposed bring revulsion and dismay. How does life produce such distasteful creatures? Palast exposes the putrid path of the Bush dynasty, the betrayal of the British voters by "New Labour" and the intrigues of international corporations in Asia, Africa, Latin America. How, he asks, do we allow these people to gain their ascendancy over our lives? One answer lies within our favourite ideal community - the small, rural, American town. There, he notes, avaricious investors have overturned local attempts to retain their values to instil the symbols of corporate enterprise - McArches, Wal-malls and chiming tacos. These blights on our landscape are made welcome - "they boost the economy"!
Palast´¿s concluding set of essays, how the Blair government sold out the British populace would bring tears to the hardiest. He shows how corporate executives and their agents have become an "arm of government" in policy making and implemetation. The arm has a long reach, extending from New York banks and government offices in Washington. Centre to these revealing articles is the overthrow of a tax on shopping mall car parks. The deal, engineered by a major corporation was part of an overall plan to "head the [Labour] government in a different direction." In other words, reverse the policies that were the foundation of Labour´¿s successes at the polls. Blair´¿s real foundation is "America´¿s enterpreneurialism," the drive for global markets which "projects corporate powers onto one tiny, cold island" welcomed by its "always-grinning native chief." Blair prides himself on "listening to industry" before formulating policy.
Palast has few peers as an investigative journalist. Of necessity, he must shield his sources, which keeps us mildly suspicious. Are things really THAT bad? Unfortunately, as time passes, his assertions are substantiated, restoring our faith in his reporting. As an investigative journalist, the solutions for many of the social ills he reports are lacking here. And so they should - the solutions lie with his readers. This book isn´¿t a prescription for what besets us, but a learning tool. He notes cases of how success against corporate indifference has been achieved. Find out how to tap in to $1.04 TRILLION available to those without adequate local banking services. Read this book to understand what is happening around you and take the first steps to implement the cure. It's your choice.
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5.0 out of 5 stars They Are Controlling Your Utilities!, July 18 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
Palast provides a factual blast of secret corporate and government liasons that have been created to rip all of us off! He's done an excellent job of tying together the names and dates of suspicious events, and the guts to spell it all out.
Turns out the U.S. government has been financing corporations, and giving those corporations lucrative contracts, as we all know. However, according to Palast these contracts are specifically for the building new utility companies, or the taking over old utility companies and deregulating them. They are trying to gain control of all utilities such as water, natural gas, cooking oil, fuel oil, waste treatment, and electricity.
Once they take control, these companies can then generate profits forever. They can also generate fake energy crisis, fake oil shortages etc, whenever they feel like it. It is obvious after reading this book that we probably went to war in IRAQ so that this fat-cat Oligarchy could build their utility companies and then get paid back whenever the Iraquis sell their oil. And this profit stream will continue forever, as long as they keep all of us driving oil burning or fuel-cell powered vehicles. What we all kind of knew was true, but couldn't really prove, Palast has now provided the facts to make it so obviously real.
This is a must-read for any aspiring republican or democrat that really wants to learn about what is going on in the world today. There is a thin line being drawn in the sand between good and evil.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Palast Does Michael Moore One Better, July 13 2004
By 
Bruce Rhodes (Stuart, Florida) - See all my reviews
I have enjoyed and recommend Michael Moore's two most recent books. However, as a practitioner of rigorous, tireless research into the subject of Bush and his dubious administration, Greg Palast is miles ahead of Mr. Moore. Palast has cultivated numerous insiders in Washington and in corporate offices, who are only too willing to pass on incriminating information about wrongdoing by senior people in government and business. Palast is as much a detective as a journalist. If Moore uses a shovel to dig into his stories, Palast uses an excavator. I admire Palast for his energy level, cleverness and tenacity. My jaw dropped many times as I read his book, finding it hard to believe that people in positions of authority could be so greedy, crooked and nasty. Thank goodness we have people like Greg Palast to offer sound alternatives to the pap we get from the complicit "media giants".
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2.0 out of 5 stars Good book, but...., June 22 2004
By 
Gergellor (SupimpalÔndia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
Thanks God there are people like Palast who still can write about the ugly truth. So, although I agree with most of the points exposed in the book (that are very well researched), my two stars rating is not about the text, but it is due to bad writing style.
The book lacks cohesion and a smooth flowing of ideas. It seems a bunch of previous articles put together in a rush. The result is that it's not an easy reading or logical reading.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good book., June 14 2004
By 
M. Fonseca "carmarthen" (Thunder) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
Very good book. Maybe the people who say that Palast is a lie are the same people that think that Oswald acted alone...
The Bush election was a fraud. Yes, the Florida electionwas a fraud.
About the evil IMF and the World Bank, I agree with the writer. It's plain for all to see. I just think he forgot to mention of of the reasons why so many Third World countries fell into the greedy hands of the IMF, the market and private companies: corruption. General governmental corruption in such a way that a first world country common person can not even think about. Corruption contributed in a important way to make these poor countries suffer continued deficits and go to the IMF for loan.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Book about Democracy You Can Buy, June 10 2004
By 
Brian Bastyr (Burr Ridge, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
Greg Palast is a U of Chicago grad who smoked from the bong of free marketeers and was able to get over his addiction to the fallacy that unregulated markets are efficient and the panacea to all our problems, from poverty to foot fungus. Palast is an investigative journalist who tackles topics ranging from the IMF and the World Bank to the electioneering in Florida. In fact, his analysis of the disenfranchisement of Florida voters is must reading as the 2004 election approaches. An American citizen based in Britain, he is able to look at things from a slightly detached perspective and asks questions the mainstream media failed to, such as, on 9/11, why is that the only planes still in the air after the attacks were shuttling members of the Bin Laden family out of the country? While Michael Moore is mainly a satirist, Palast is a true journalist in that he is able to dig into hidden memos and dodgy laws to bring us a view of the truth that we would not otherwise be exposed to. Most impressive is that because of Palast's educational background, he is one of the few journalists qualified to crunch statistical information and come up with cogent explanations.
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1.0 out of 5 stars don't waste or time or money, June 8 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
While I share his point of view regarding Exxon,Enron,Bush.....
his arguments are juvenile and riddled with errors. He has the
intellect of a 3rd grader. He reminds me of one of those recovered alcoholic drug addicts who, having found religion, stands at a street corner yelling at cars as they pass. There is
much that can and should be learned about these various topics.
But not from this "writer".
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1.0 out of 5 stars More left-wing lunacy, June 7 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
More left-wing lunacy from one of America's most notorious socialists. Filled with hate-spewed ideology against open markets, globalization and just about everything else...Greg Palast's book is yet another illogical screed by an indiviual who loves Karl Marx but hates Ronald Reagan...
Unless you've already consumed copius amounts of Moveon.org Kool-Aid you won't enjoy this ridiculous book. SAVE YOUR MONEY.
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5.0 out of 5 stars ESSENTIAL READING, June 3 2004
By 
C. D. Chinn (Chester, NE. United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
This book explores the connections and tells us how certain things happen. The book revolves around Greg Plast's investigative journalism to remind us that 'reporting' can mean more than publishing a press release.
Some of these articles are on his web site, so you can check out his writings before you end up buying this fantastic book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Should be mandatory reading for all Americans., May 16 2004
By 
This review is from: Best Democracy Money Can Buy (Paperback)
Ok, all Britons too.
Not only is Palast an excellent investigative reporter, he is a good writer as well. As you travel the backwaters of corporate shell-games, globalization disasters, and politicians that seemingly have never known shame...you find yourself asking, "Why didn't the mainstream press cover this?"
And that is one of the most important reasons to read this tightly-knit, well-crafted collection of exposés.
Good work, Greg.
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