Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carmen Miranda was onto something
If you have even a smidgen of what the United Fruit Co. was all about, you will love this look at the world's most popular fruit--the banana. That connection will help you understand the true meaning of a banana republic and how US foreign policy in Latin America was shaped by this fruit (get the book and all will be revealed).

Banana doesn't stop there. The...
Published on Feb. 19 2009 by Brian Maitland

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars interesting very broad overview
Koeppel covers just about all conceivable ground, but his concise political and historical summaries are rather more effective than his attempts to deal with the more scientific side of the story. These are diffuse if not obscurantist or irrelevant (e.g., a page-long description of a banana-devoid street outside a building that houses an institute devoted to study of the...
Published 6 months ago by ogilvie


Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carmen Miranda was onto something, Feb. 19 2009
By 
Brian Maitland (Vancouver, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World (Paperback)
If you have even a smidgen of what the United Fruit Co. was all about, you will love this look at the world's most popular fruit--the banana. That connection will help you understand the true meaning of a banana republic and how US foreign policy in Latin America was shaped by this fruit (get the book and all will be revealed).

Banana doesn't stop there. The author presents some important yet not widely known info about the fruit. We learn about the popular varieties of bananas (yes, not all bananas are created equal), the lyrics of that famous Carmen Miranda song that presented such a falsehood about refrigerating bananas, the reason genetic modification may actually save this tasty fruit from extinction and many more tangents that help us understand why this simple fruit is a world changer.

The writing is in-depth but with a breezy style. Adding the "Banana Time Line" in the Appendix was a stroke of genius. Even the cover adds a nice, almost Warholian Velvets and Nico album cover, touch by having the banana pictured actually feel like a banana skin when you run your fingers over it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars interesting very broad overview, June 6 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World (Paperback)
Koeppel covers just about all conceivable ground, but his concise political and historical summaries are rather more effective than his attempts to deal with the more scientific side of the story. These are diffuse if not obscurantist or irrelevant (e.g., a page-long description of a banana-devoid street outside a building that houses an institute devoted to study of the banana). Students of Central American history are likely to find the relevant sections of the book of interest.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World
Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World by Dan Koeppel (Paperback - Jan. 13 2009)
CDN$ 19.00 CDN$ 13.72
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews