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5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible
Candide (optimism), first published in 1759, has a lot to do with destiny, and how everything in preordained. Thus, whatever you do to try to change your life, you cannot possibly change it. If you are meant to meet a specific person, no matter what the situation is, you will run into them.

This satire is the most unique story I have ever read; I did not know...
Published on Dec 20 2009 by Sam

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Candid About Candide
The style of exposition used in this book is reminiscent of The Misfortunes of Virtue by the Marquis de Sade. Voltaire presents a catalog of calamities meant to debunk the belief that our world is perfect, and that everything happens "for the best" according to some divine plan. While there is no doubt that Candide is persuasive in its comical misadventures, the...
Published on July 14 2004 by Sean K.


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4.0 out of 5 stars A certain kind of humor, April 1 2003
By A Customer
If you're a history guru, or you love hearing people subtly poke fun at authority, you'll love Candide! Voltaire did a wonderful job of musing about the patterns of life and undermining political figures of his time. A word of caution: those with little historical background on this time period may find it silly and trivial. (Just how Voltaire wanted the authority of his time to see it, ha ha). However, I loved it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Candide, Jan. 9 2003
By A Customer
Explore into Voltaire's world as you read the piece of literature he wrote to express his opinions and scrutiny of society. Candide is an adventurous novel with a philosophical viewpoint. See society through the eyes of Candide's experiences with all the negative and positive aspects. Candide is a young man who is deeply in love with the baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh's daughter, Cunegonde. Although, the baron and his son will never aprove of their love Candide will always hold her love close to him. Candide is tricked throughout the novel and taken advantage of many times. He lives with the many philosphical points of his teacher, Pangloss. Candide doubts Pangloss' theorys throughout the novel, and decides what his own theory's are by observing people and through his many interactions that he encounters. Candide meets many people that he either rescues from poverty or is being arrested for ridiculous speculations. In the end everything went chaotic for a reason, and Candide finds hisself being the optimist after all.
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5.0 out of 5 stars entertaining and clever, Dec 19 2002
By 
Kaitlin (New York, NY) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Candide (Paperback)
Candide is truly enjoyable and keeps one entertained throughout the entire story--there is never a dull moment, and you will NOT find your mind wandering while reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!, Dec 15 2002
By 
Christina (Columbus, OH USA) - See all my reviews
Still today, over two hundred years after it was written, Candide still shines as one of literature's best satires.
The book is full of pessimism does not prevent him from using humor throughout the book. Some of the humor used in the book is blatant; the governor of Buenos Ayres declares his love for Cunégonde, says he will marry her, then never does. In case readers did not understand the hypocrisy, Voltaire gave the governor a name to remember: Don Fernando d'Ibaraa y Figuerora y Mascarenes y Lampourdos y Souza. Another interesting name is that of Baron Thunder-ten-tronckh. The illeteration and mental imagery is what stood out for me; the name brings pictures of a corpulent man thundering down a hall. It does not sound aristocratic (if indeed, names can be aristocratic) and seems more of a misnomer than a label for a noble from Wittenburg. By examining the Baron's behavior (working everyone towards his goals and then profiting from their labor while he does nothing) the name is no longer a misnomer.
Candide reminded me of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote in that a man following the regulations of chivalry is driven to do the correct thing even though disastrous consequences may come of it. Candine discovers this when he rescues Cunégonde from a Turkish noble and finds she is ugly and disagreeable. In addition, Don Quixote and Candide both find themselves in improbable situations over and over again. Both books are satire and they poke fun at the same government, social, and ecclesiastical principles. Despite the similarity, I did enjoy reading Candide more so than I did Don Quixote.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Expression from the heart....., Dec 10 2002
By 
Nam Chung "Nick" (Surrey, Canada/British Columbia/North America Canada) - See all my reviews
Complete shock with mix of giggle and 3rd eye opened with depth of meaning. I have read this book at least 7 times: thoroughly. With short words, I give this book an enormous respect: Satiric, philosophical, historical and AWESOME. This writing reflects Voltaire's life like a mirror and his wisdom like a still water. This book flows like a flowing water and it stays like a limestone. I don't have much more to say but it is your choice. Afterall, this is one of the theme of the book. Destiny & free will. Bravo!
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best works ever, Nov. 7 2002
By A Customer
I had to read this book for english class. at first, i thought it would another one of those hard to read boring classics. Then i found out how wrong i was. this is one of the best books i've read so far. it has so much truth and Voltaire informs us on moral values. the theme of this book fascinated me and even inspired me. I absolutely love and cherish this book. I found it relating to our society in so many ways and specifically to my life. I finished this book in one day... that's how much i was intrigued and fascinated by it! I recommend this book to everyone. It's a must read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Fairy Tale for the Thinkers, Oct. 9 2002
Everyone will like this story for different reasons. It's easily read, and one can then toss out the phrase "I, frequent reader of Voltaire, think...". Alternatively, one can read it AND think about it. How strikingly funny it is. How incredibly relevant it remains to this day. How possible it is to challenge blind optimism and yet not wallow in complete despair and self-pity. Above all, I found it to be a very accessible work of philosophy. Ahem. I mean, "I, frequent reader of Voltaire, think it is a rather accessible work of philosophy..."
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2.0 out of 5 stars Needs to be written in new style english, Oct. 7 2002
By A Customer
I disliked the book very strongly. If it was in new style english and brought out the meanings in plain words it would have been so much better.
It took me reading somethings 4 or 5 times to understand its real meaning, and sometimes after that it still didn't make sense to me. I did find it weird how the story from way back at that time is really close to a lot of stories on the Jerry Springer show.
To end my review you would like it if you were into old english literature, but thats just not for me.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Ultimate Satire, Sept. 26 2002
By 
ShayShay (Warner Robins, GA) - See all my reviews
While I must say that I would have never read this book on my own, and satire is really not my favorite genre, it was a fairly good book. It took a second read to appreciate the elements that Voltaire incorporates into every passage of the novel. There is literally nothing that isn't satirized in Candide. I found this book a very tedious and I did not enjoy the wild plot as Candide and his fellow friends travelled all across the world, never to escape sorrows. If you are reading it for surface content and plot I'm afraid you will be sorely disapointed. Enjoy the satire within it and you will be more likely to appreciate the novel more.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Remarkable Satire for the Ages, Sept. 2 2002
By 
Neil Cotiaux (North Canton, Ohio United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
In the 1920's, long after Voltaire wrote "Candide", Emil Coue (France's version of Norman Vincent Peale) coined the phrase, "Every day, and in every way, I am getting better and better."
Well, maybe his disciples were, but Hitler had exchanged his paint brush for a pen, the Colonialists were carving up "The Dark Continent", and the bubble was about to burst on Wall Street.
Fast forward to the 21st Century, ushered in by a variety of "religious" madmen holding The One, True Answer; church "leaders" perpetuating a cover-up of clerical abuse and corporate executives who let their underlings "eat cake"; and you know that nothing - absolutely nothing - will change. Did Nostradamus really believe the war at the start of this Millennium would set the stage for an unprecedented era of world peace?
"Candide" is a thoroughly delicious satire with a very dark underside. Voltaire punctures, he skewers, he scoffs, and in the end, asks us to make the best of a bad lot by steering clear of the charlatans, keeping our heads down, and sticking to the garden path.
But remember: Even in the Garden, there are weeds to be pulled -literally and figuratively - in our own, small way.
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Candide
Candide by Voltaire (Paperback - Jan. 1 1991)
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