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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich book
This is the second James Joyce book I have read and it goes to reinforce the feeling I had after reading the first that that writer is a great storyteller. In fact, I consider
James Joyce's Dubliners as one of the best collection of short stories ever put together. The settings are amazing and the rich and lively characters all combine with the incredible plots to...
Published on July 29 2005 by Sancho Mahle

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3.0 out of 5 stars Not reader friendly
The book is a series of short stories about different groups of people in Dublin, Ireland. Joyce uses these short stories to expose the social wrongs and paralysis of morals around the turn of the 20th century in Dublin. All of the stories end in tragedy, sadness, or continuation of a previous wrong. James Joyce's Dubliners was an interesting book, to say the least. At...
Published on March 23 2001 by Aaron McCoy


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dublin as the center of the world, April 7 2004
Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Paperback)
Despite being written almost a hundred years ago, James Joyce's 'Dubliners' is still as fresh as when it was released. The characters are Dubliners, but above all they are human beings and act as such, and this makes this collection of fifteen stories so universal. Moreover this book is a good start for readers who want to read Joyce and are afraid of his most famous and notoriously difficult works such as "Ulysses" and "Finnegans Wake".
The tales are supposed to be read in the order they are published because they follow the natural course of the human life. The first ones deal with childhood, then with adolescence, later adulthood --and in this segment some of them deal with public life-- and the last one is called "The Dead", making it clear that the stories follow the sequence of life events that happen to everyone.
Joyce's brother Stanislaus Joyce once wrote that the book pairs up stories on common themes: adolescent life, sporting life, artistic life, amorous life, political life, religious life, and celibate life (male and female), plus four 'petty employees' (two married and two unmarried), plus the final story on 'holiday life'. But this kind of classification is only a plus when one reads the book, because what really matters is Joyce's ability to create real people and situation.
Not only does the writer makes a wonderful job when developing his characters in such a small form of telling a story, but he also has a sophisticated command of the language. And some academics claim that "The Dead" is one of the best --if not THE best-- piece of short fiction written in the 20 century.
The view of the human nature in this book is quite dark most of the time, dealing mostly with the failure or the impossibility of acquisition something desired, Joyce is able to sneak in the human soul and its incapability of coping with loss, fear and another difficult feelings.
Most of the stories in "Dubliners" are not easy to be read, but all of them are a real pleasure to be discovered. An important book that with some concentration is accessible to everyone.
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5.0 out of 5 stars great stories., Aug. 4 2014
Achat vérifié(Quest-ce que cest?)
Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Paperback)
As expected, great stories.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars snapshots of life in Dublin, June 12 2004
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Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Paperback)
I have to admit that I didn't read all the stories(I did it for school as a HS junior, they didn't require reading all of them) and it's not the most exciting book. However, Joyce's stories are like snapshots of everyday life and I'm fascinated by that. He gives us vivid images of how unattractive Dublin is and tours into the minds the characters. Some stories are boring and hard to read but Joyce is good enough as a storyteller to give us pictures of life in Dublin that stick in your head.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Chinatown, April 25 2001
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K. Reade (ny, ny) - See all my reviews
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Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Hardcover)
Arguably the most boring book ever written, Joyce excels here in causing premature napping in most of his readers. If he's not describing the cobblestone archways or the giant marshmallow who lives down the street, he is trying to convince us that Dublin is in Ireland. I'm not biting.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "A long mournful whistle into the mist", Nov. 28 2008
By 
Linda Bulger (United States) - See all my reviews
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Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Hardcover)
Although James Joyce lived outside of his native Ireland for most of his life, his work is as Irish as peat smoke. His story collection Dubliners, published in 1914, consists of fifteen slices of early 20th century life in the city where Joyce was born. Dublin itself is a detailed backdrop, and the self-awareness of the characters plays out on Dublin's streets and interiors. The reader doesn't find rollicking plots here, but the character sketches are rewarding and somewhat open-ended. Many of the characters are at some turning point or epiphany; many are rather unlovely; but all go under the lens with no moral judgment from the author. This is not a book that spoon-feeds attitudes or opinions.

Joyce reveals to us a boy whose adventure leads to a brush with a child molester; a young woman planning to elope but choosing the safety of domestic servitude at the last minute; a boarding house proprietor who turns a blind eye as her daughter gets pregnant by one of the residents; a rage-filled clerk who craves drink and takes out his frustration on his colleagues and family; an emotionally remote man who spurns the affection of a woman and is confronted with his own loneliness when he sees her obituary in the paper. In the final story, the novella-length "The Dead," Gabriel is an educated but socially awkward character who suddenly realizes that his lack of engagement with life is profoundly crippling.

These characters don't seem to be putting their best feet forward for the reader's entertainment, but they ARE drenched in their own realities. The trappings of religion thread through the stories ("the Holy Ghost and the banshee"), as do poverty, drink, repression, fear and rage. Was this the Ireland feeling its national identity, unfurling itself after the Local Government Act set it on a liberating course to Home Rule? Dubliners is like a family portrait taken early in the morning after a long, hard night; there's no romanticizing and it may not be the whole truth, but you have to acknowledge that the shadowed eyes and weary postures have a crystalline reality. Five stars.

Linda Bulger, 2008
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Alright, Oct. 15 2011
By 
Mark Nenadov "arm-chair reader" (Essex, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
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Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Paperback)
Not bad. I really like the writing style/imagery on the micro level. But only one or two of the stories were compelling to me on the macro/big picture level.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars don't waste your time, Jan. 8 2002
Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Mass Market Paperback)
perhaps you enjoy reading James Joyce. that being the case, ignore what i am about to say lest you take offense...
James Joyce is the biggest joke. nothing but a drunken Irishman, he writes both predictably and AGITATINGLY. his diction bothers me and his language frustrates me more.
these stories, all written about Joyce's passion for Ireland do capture the lifestyle, i'll give the man that much, and he does utilize his poetic styles, but overall, i can't stand reading him. but let's be honest here, he needed more than some eye-catching words to attract and keep my attention.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Complete Rubbish, Jan. 25 2002
By 
C. H. Ratliff "Heath Rat Su" (Sacramento, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Hardcover)
James Joyce is the most unreadable author to ever have been washed into xistance from the womb of Ireland. It is an indication of the non-relevance of education today, that this book is required reading for many of our youths. This novel belongs on the mantle of some poor sod who can't find anything better to do with his time other than perhaps wacking himself repeatedly on the genitals with a blunt object ad infinitum. Beleive me, this book is less painful, but only in that it ENDS. Avoid it at all costs, and punch anyone who recommends it to you square in the gob.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars No one should read Dubliners, Feb. 22 2004
By A Customer
Ce commentaire est de: Dubliners (Paperback)
This book is so full of crap. It's awful. If you really wanna read it, set aside 15 hours of your time for each story! Criticism is non existant and high school seniors should NOT be made to read this book. Yes, I know all of the stories have some sort of "greater meaning" behind them, but it is so full of detail, every single word has an impact on the meaning of each story as a whole. I recommend that you find another book to read that you will actually enjoy, like Mercedes Lackey. Actually, Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes is a very well-written book and very enjoyable. Much more so than Dubliners.
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Dubliners
Dubliners by James Joyce (Paperback - May 1 1991)
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