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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American classic that must be read by all (and never banned), May 5 2007
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
If there's any book out there that needs no introduction (or review, to be honest), it's Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Yet here I am reviewing it, anyway. I must admit (not without a fair share of embarrassment) that I just now got around to reading this American classic for the first time. I never had to read it in school, and to some degree I felt pretty familiar with the novel even without having read it -- that's just how popular and important Huckleberry Finn is to the social fabric of America.

Nowadays, with all the politically correct liberals having escaped their Berkeley zoo and run amuck all over the nation, many of our young people are told not to read this novel. In fact, legions of voices cry out for poor little Huck Finn, that beloved rascal of literature, to be banned from schools and libraries -- for the crime of using the n-word, a word commonly used by both blacks and whites up and down the Mississippi during Huck's time (not to mention numerous hip-hop artists of today). Turning a blind eye to the fact that Twain made the slave Jim a noble, human, easy-going fellow with his heart always in the right place (unlike Huck's other companions), the literary fascists contend that this novel is poison to the minds of youngsters. One can only imagine the reaction Mark Twain would have to the hysteria his book incites in liberals today (although he would certainly not be surprised, as he had to fight censorship of this book from the date of its publication).

One of the great ironies of the "Ban Huck Finn" brouhaha is the fact that young people will surely find this novel much more entertaining than the vast majority of other literary classics they are asked to read. This is a very funny book, especially once "the duke and the dauphin" arrive on the scene and, later, when Tom Sawyer meticulously plans out Jim's rescue from captivity (no thanks to the captors, who didn't even try to make it as difficult as Tom says it should be). Young readers will also relate to and understand this book, a fact which should give rise to spirited discussion of it in class. Don't we want our kids to be excited about books and reading?

The more outrageous the hissy fits thrown by liberal critics over the "dangers" of Huck Finn, the more important it is for everyone, young and old alike, to go out and read Twain's novel. Whenever someone tells you not to read something, it's important that you go out there and read it -- and discover whatever it is the book banning loonies don't want you to know. Prove to them that you are intelligent enough to know the difference between the social values of the past and present, fiction and reality, right and wrong, etc. Think for yourself. Read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece. (Spoiler Alert), July 27 2013
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
I think it goes without saying that Mark Twain is a genius, as a man, humourist, and writer in general. The characters he created in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' and more importantly, this book, are classics in literature. I loved this book so much - Twain's style is entrancing, and makes you forget at some points that you're actually reading a book. Reading 'Huckleberry Finn' is an experience, one that everyone should have.

It deals with everything American: the racial divide, the search for identity, the Actual and the Imaginary, the power of the individual over the many. The list could go on. Twain wrote a deceptively complex book, because children have loved it, and university students will continue to study it. It's a picaresque novel, a Bildungsroman, and more. I have heard about lots of controversy concerning racial language, but I stand firm in thinking that it's part of the journey, and should be there in order to adequately look at the world Twain has created.

The relationship between Huckleberry and Jim is really heart-warming: they're two outsiders trying to find their way in the world, and it's beautiful how they connect, and even more beautiful when Huck realizes just how unimportant race in defining a man. Jim is wise to more practical things (despite his superstitions), and it rubs off on his new friend as they drift down the Mississippi River.

If I can find any fault, it's this: the book goes on longer than it should. While it's nice that Jim is rescued in the end, and you get some kind of closure, I'm inclined to agree with Hemingway and other critics that it should have ended when he was handed over to the Phelps family. That is where Huckleberry's story really comes to a close - Tom Sawyer shouldn't have come back into the novel.

But that's minute. Read 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'! It'll stay with you for a long time after you've done it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A book not meant for everyone, but everyone should READ it., Feb. 21 2001
By 
Justin Evans (West Wendover, Nevada United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
When I first read this book, I was so taken with it, that I read from chapter 18 through the end of the book in one night. I was up until 3:30 in the morning, reading ahead of my 11th grade assignment, and loving every minute along the way. later in college, when I studied the book more, closer, and with a more educated eye (whatever that means) my love for the book increased. Now, as a teacher myself, I look forward to having my students read this book and discussing it in class.
But now as for the title of my review:
I can't help feeling bad for people who think that this is not a good novel because "we don't talk like that anymore." Are we to abandon books that are no longer contemporary to ourselves? I also take issue with people who claim that this book is a racist tirade based upon the use of the word "nigger," or because the escape route Jim took was down the Mississippi instead of up river. While currently offensive, Mark Twain used the term as a literary fact that most, if not all young boys of the south spoke in such a manner. Once more, Jim explained why he was going South before he headed north. the simple fact is that if you are going to criticize a book, then you should read it. mark Twain said as much in his essay, "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses."
From reading a number of the reviews of this book, I have come to the opinion that while many read the book, more than a few are refusing to give Twain credit for subtext and the use of allegory. One reviewer down the line says that the book is racist because Twain makes a young boy to be twice as smart as Jim. Upon closer reading, Twain is showing what Huck feels to be true. Huck only thinks that he is smarter. The reader should pick up on the fact that Twain writes Jim as an intuitive father figure for Huck, one who teaches a true morality as opposed to the morality of the South.
Simply put, you get what you put in to the reading of this book. If you think is is going to be a boring read because you "have to" read it for a summer reading list or school assignment, then that's what it will be. If you think it will be a difficult read because you don't want to try and read in dialects other than your own, it will be a hard read. If you are looking to justify the book as racist because of a single word that presentism doesn't excuse, then have at it. This book can be all of those things. However, this book also has the potential to enlighten the reader, give something wonderful to the reader, and teach about the human condition.
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5.0 out of 5 stars THE Great American Novel, May 1 2000
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
This is the granddaddy of American literature. Mark Twain is an American icon. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn slyly purports to be a boys book about freedom on the river. It pretends to have no moral or motive at all. This is not so. Mark Twain, in spite his opening rebuke against anyone finding a meaning in the book, is seeking to make a statement. This is a polemic against the evils of slavery. I often felt that Huck Finn parallels Twains own youth. Huck grows to see Jim as a man and a friend. Twain came from a family which owned slaves but he himself came to be vehemently opposed to slavery. Huck Finn comes from a background where slavery is perfectly acceptable. The grand climax is when Huck decides he will go to Hell rather than let his friend be sold back into slavery. He continues to help Jim. This is an amazing tale although the ending is a bit anticlimactic. One is happy that Jim is free however. He emerges as the one true man and gentleman in the whole novel. This is one of the great underlying ironies of the novel. It is often overlooked due to the politically incorrect racial slurs. The slave is the man with the greatest dignity and integrity. It is unfortunate that this point is missed. Mark Twain wrote a masterpiece. The current controversy will eventually fade but The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn will endure as one of the great works of American and World literature.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wow thats funny., July 4 2003
By 
Jonathan McCall "RPG Fan" (NC, U.S.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
I swear i never saw the word nigger so many times in a book. And it was a real hoot to. I Couldnt help but laugh...everytime they made mention of a nigger. somthin about the ignorance of it is funny i guess On a serious note it Is a very good read, and it speaks alot about the ignorance of the times. Somthing that we need to face lest history repeat itself.
I was fascinated with the open and blatant use of racial slurrs which are never heard in our polictically correct society today. And the way the language of the early african americans is depicted like "I laid dah under the shavins all day. I uz hungry warn't afeared bekase I knowed ole missus en de widder was goin to start for de camp meetin."
I like it when these books are rewritten exactly as they are and not edited as so many historical things are so as not to "offend" anyone. A rousing and funny fictional story set in the back drop of actual historical surroundings. Its a fine read for all.
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5.0 out of 5 stars THE ADVENTURE OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Dec 7 2000
By 
Tram Nguyen (San Francisco, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
The book THE HUCKLEBERRY FINN, by Mark Twain is the best adventure book that I have ever read during the past few years. The book give me a lot of suspenses that kept me continuing to read until I finished with the book. The book describes each and every adventure that Huck Finn goes through with Jim, a slave that he met. There were times when they were in danger and almost died and there were times when they shared precious moments together like father and son, even though one is black and the other is white. This is the book that no one would want to miss if you love to read books that are fill with adventure and exctment.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Of course it's a classic!, Jan. 15 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
.
I'll admit I've never been to hot on Mark Twain.
But I'm also constrained to say that Huck Finn is a great book.
Huck Finn is a great book.
And I'ld recommend this edition:
1) it's cheap 2) it's very readable 3) it's the perfect size 4) the type is neither large nor small, but closer to the latter
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5.0 out of 5 stars A true classic, Jan. 17 2015
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This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
A classic it is after all. This will make you laugh, will make you cry and experience a lot of different emotions. There has also been research done on the book that suggest readers from different age, take different lessons from this book. So yes, a must read!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, Nov. 1 2014
This review is from: Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
Great addition to my library.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A, Jan. 23 2015
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This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
old classic a good read
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Paperback - May 26 1994)
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