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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American classic that must be read by all (and never banned)
If there's any book out there that needs no introduction (or review, to be honest), it's Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Yet here I am reviewing it, anyway. I must admit (not without a fair share of embarrassment) that I just now got around to reading this American classic for the first time. I never had to read it in school, and to some degree I felt...
Published on May 5 2007 by Daniel Jolley

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great story, but...
...the dialect is irritating. On one hand, I can't deny that the dialect adds character to the first-person narrative, and is, in that respect, functional. On the other hand, it's *irritating*! I had to re-read countless sentences because of it. I can only imagine what reading this book must be like for someone who's first language isn't English. The story itself is...
Published on June 21 2004 by Caradae Linore


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American classic that must be read by all (and never banned), May 5 2007
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
If there's any book out there that needs no introduction (or review, to be honest), it's Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Yet here I am reviewing it, anyway. I must admit (not without a fair share of embarrassment) that I just now got around to reading this American classic for the first time. I never had to read it in school, and to some degree I felt pretty familiar with the novel even without having read it -- that's just how popular and important Huckleberry Finn is to the social fabric of America.

Nowadays, with all the politically correct liberals having escaped their Berkeley zoo and run amuck all over the nation, many of our young people are told not to read this novel. In fact, legions of voices cry out for poor little Huck Finn, that beloved rascal of literature, to be banned from schools and libraries -- for the crime of using the n-word, a word commonly used by both blacks and whites up and down the Mississippi during Huck's time (not to mention numerous hip-hop artists of today). Turning a blind eye to the fact that Twain made the slave Jim a noble, human, easy-going fellow with his heart always in the right place (unlike Huck's other companions), the literary fascists contend that this novel is poison to the minds of youngsters. One can only imagine the reaction Mark Twain would have to the hysteria his book incites in liberals today (although he would certainly not be surprised, as he had to fight censorship of this book from the date of its publication).

One of the great ironies of the "Ban Huck Finn" brouhaha is the fact that young people will surely find this novel much more entertaining than the vast majority of other literary classics they are asked to read. This is a very funny book, especially once "the duke and the dauphin" arrive on the scene and, later, when Tom Sawyer meticulously plans out Jim's rescue from captivity (no thanks to the captors, who didn't even try to make it as difficult as Tom says it should be). Young readers will also relate to and understand this book, a fact which should give rise to spirited discussion of it in class. Don't we want our kids to be excited about books and reading?

The more outrageous the hissy fits thrown by liberal critics over the "dangers" of Huck Finn, the more important it is for everyone, young and old alike, to go out and read Twain's novel. Whenever someone tells you not to read something, it's important that you go out there and read it -- and discover whatever it is the book banning loonies don't want you to know. Prove to them that you are intelligent enough to know the difference between the social values of the past and present, fiction and reality, right and wrong, etc. Think for yourself. Read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece. (Spoiler Alert), July 27 2013
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
I think it goes without saying that Mark Twain is a genius, as a man, humourist, and writer in general. The characters he created in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' and more importantly, this book, are classics in literature. I loved this book so much - Twain's style is entrancing, and makes you forget at some points that you're actually reading a book. Reading 'Huckleberry Finn' is an experience, one that everyone should have.

It deals with everything American: the racial divide, the search for identity, the Actual and the Imaginary, the power of the individual over the many. The list could go on. Twain wrote a deceptively complex book, because children have loved it, and university students will continue to study it. It's a picaresque novel, a Bildungsroman, and more. I have heard about lots of controversy concerning racial language, but I stand firm in thinking that it's part of the journey, and should be there in order to adequately look at the world Twain has created.

The relationship between Huckleberry and Jim is really heart-warming: they're two outsiders trying to find their way in the world, and it's beautiful how they connect, and even more beautiful when Huck realizes just how unimportant race in defining a man. Jim is wise to more practical things (despite his superstitions), and it rubs off on his new friend as they drift down the Mississippi River.

If I can find any fault, it's this: the book goes on longer than it should. While it's nice that Jim is rescued in the end, and you get some kind of closure, I'm inclined to agree with Hemingway and other critics that it should have ended when he was handed over to the Phelps family. That is where Huckleberry's story really comes to a close - Tom Sawyer shouldn't have come back into the novel.

But that's minute. Read 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'! It'll stay with you for a long time after you've done it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Huckleberry Finn, Dec 19 2012
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I chose this rating because the book Huckleberry Finn met my expectations, it was hard cover and a good size.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Adventure Story, March 9 2006
By 
Huckleberry Finn is a great book! It’s an adventure book by Mark Twain. The story takes place in Huck’s hometown of Petersburg, Missouri. This took place in the mid-1800’s when slavery was still legal in the southern states. The story really begins when Huck runs away from the widow and his drunken father. Huck decides to run away and start a new life without listening to the widow’s grown-up rules. He also wants to avoid being mugged by his father and locked up in a shed constantly.
There are two main characters in this book: Huckleberry Finn and Jim. Huckleberry is the boy who escapes his life and Jim is the widow’s slave. Huckleberry found Jim on the island he went to when he escaped from his evil stepfather. My opinion is that it’s a great adventure book and he has some travels in the story to remote islands and St. Louis, Missouri.
Even though it is a great novel there are some other parts in this book that tend to become violent, so the reader should be at least ten years old or more. If I had to rate this book I’d give it 9 stars out of 10. It could have been a 10 if the author but some more clear details about some conclusions for the characters. Example: Who and what happened to the murderers on the steamboat? I would have liked to know how Huck’s father died at the end of this novel.
This book is great if you’re looking for adventures about runaway kids or just exploring and being on your own. The added bonus in this book is that if you know the character known as Tom Sawyer from The Adventure’s of Tom Sawyer, he is in this book too!
Huckleberry Finn is a great book! It’s an adventure book by Mark Twain. The story takes place in Huck’s hometown of Petersburg, Missouri. This took place in the mid-1800’s when slavery was still legal in the southern states. The story really begins when Huck runs away from the widow and his drunken father. Huck decides to run away and start a new life without listening to the widow’s grown-up rules. He also wants to avoid being mugged by his father and locked up in a shed constantly.
There are two main characters in this book: Huckleberry Finn and Jim. Huckleberry is the boy who escapes his life and Jim is the widow’s slave. Huckleberry found Jim on the island he went to when he escaped from his evil stepfather. My opinion is that it’s a great adventure book and he has some travels in the story to remote islands and St. Louis, Missouri.
Even though it is a great novel there are some other parts in this book that tend to become violent, so the reader should be at least ten years old or more. If I had to rate this book I’d give it 9 stars out of 10. It could have been a 10 if the author but some more clear details about some conclusions for the characters. Example: Who and what happened to the murderers on the steamboat? I would have liked to know how Huck’s father died at the end of this novel.
This book is great if you’re looking for adventures about runaway kids or just exploring and being on your own. The added bonus in this book is that if you know the character known as Tom Sawyer from The Adventure’s of Tom Sawyer, he is in this book too!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great story, but..., June 21 2004
By 
...the dialect is irritating. On one hand, I can't deny that the dialect adds character to the first-person narrative, and is, in that respect, functional. On the other hand, it's *irritating*! I had to re-read countless sentences because of it. I can only imagine what reading this book must be like for someone who's first language isn't English. The story itself is great, though. I can see why it's a classic. It's filled with endearing characters and adventures, and it's a very important book as it focuses on the issues of slavery and the irony of a so-called "civilization" that keeps slaves. A great read, dialect aside.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good but annoying book, Nov. 19 2011
received the book quickly and easily. Was in good condition. Only problem was that pages 70 to 95 were missing and an extra duplicate of 95 to 125 were added. other then the annoying part that the entire story wasn't there, was a well kept book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Huck Finn is da bomb, Jan. 13 2005
So many coming of age books owe a debt of thanks to HUCK FINN. Salinger's CATCHER IN THE RYE is one, along with the more modern BARK OF THE DOGWOOD. There are others, but the first true one was HUCK. The genius of Mark Twain is that the entire story is conceptualized and told from the perspective of 13-14 year old orphan boy, with almost no formal education at all. The telling of the tale gets a bit complicated if we look at the use, or in this case, misuse of the English language. Ahead of its time, STILL, this is good solid American reading. Would also recommend the collection of short stories titled THE CHILDREN'S CORNER for some excellent reading. Cheers!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic, June 20 2004
By A Customer
Always hesitant of the word "classic," I picked up this book with trepidation. It wasn't required reading at any point, and some libraries still have problems with it today because of certain words and scenes. That said, I plunged right in and haven't been sorry since. This is a charming tale that will definitely take you someplace you've not been before. And isn't that what we all want?--to go where we haven't been or can't go? Though not as funny as some other of Twain's books (think "Life on the Mississippi"), "Huck Finn" is an easy read, told by a child narrator. Like other child narrated books--Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" and McCrae's "Bark of the Dogwood," Twain's "Huck Finn" uses this technique to great effect. This, coupled with a very distinctive style, not really like any other Twain work except one, makes this a highly unusual book. One must also take into consideration "when" this book was written and how new it must have seemed then with its incorrect grammar and style. Suffice it to say that "Huck Finn" will stay on my (and other's) bookshelf for a while.
Also recommended: To Kill a Mockingbird, Bark of the Dogwood, Catch 22
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4.0 out of 5 stars Lisa's review on Huckleberry finn! <3, June 15 2004
By A Customer
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN REVIEW.
The adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a heartfilled story. It shows one teens journey through the Mississippi River, running away from his father and helping a runaway slave named Jim, who he soon befriends, to the north. This story shows how different some people can be, though they do have hard times, but are still true friends.
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is an exciting book that will keep you guessing. The writter Samuel Clemens, pen name of Mark Twain, really brings the story alive for you. He makes his story feel so real. It wasn't like I was just reading the story, It really felt like I was there, watching Huck and Jim floating down the Mississippi River on their log raft. Mark twain makes the journey so funfilled and full of enjoyment that you can't put the book down. I had to read this book for 6th grade during summer vacation. I thought it would be a drag, but as soon as I read the first chapter I couldn't put it down...not for a second. I couldn't wait to see what was comming next because with every chapter this book gets more and more exciting until the very last page.
The Adventures od Huckleberry Finn is fun, suspensful, and comical at some times. I would recommend this book to anyone, of any age who wants to get swept away in an amazing story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Greatest version of America's Greatest Book, June 14 2004
By 
Mark J. Fowler "Let's Play Two!" (Blytheville, Arkansas (The "the" is silent)) - See all my reviews
This review isn't to give a review of one of the most studied works of the English language, but rather to detail what makes this edition special and worthy of purchase.
At the most superficial level Huck is the sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, which had introduced us to these two icons of the printed word. After Tom Sawyer was a big hit the publisher, perhaps understandably, wanted not only a sequel, but one which logically followed Tom Sawyer. They specifically desired for the two works to sit comfortably on a shelf together. Perhaps there was a time when Mark Twain desired the same thing - more of the same crowd pleasing story telling. But I think that perhaps from the beginning he recognized that he now had the audience that he wanted for his masterpiece, so he began writing it.
Even in the form which was familiar for 100 years Huckleberry Finn was widely hailed as the centerpiece of American Literature. THIS edition reveals that the masterpiece as originally conceived was even more masterly.
Clemens wrote the original manuscript and submitted it to the publisher. I don't know what they thought of the book as it was, but one thing was clear: it was a good deal longer than Tom Sawyer and sitting side by side with Tom Sawyer the two books looked less like a "pair".
So.... the editorial pruning process began and enough was removed from the originally conceived Huckleberry Finn to create both the originally published versions of Huck as well as "Life on the Mississippi".
Now we finally get to see the "complete Huck". The missing text flows along with the "original Huck" as mightily as the Mississippi that Huck and Jim ride along in the book of our dreams.
As if that were enough, we also are treated to original illustrations and facsimile reproductions of several of Twain's original text. I found these pages among the most enlightening of all. Almost as if he knew his handwritten pages would be looked at by posterity, Twain used a unique revision technique. Rather than erasing a word or passage he wishes to replace, he would instead line through the words in a single line, leaving the replaced word legible along with the words which would replace the revised word. By examining these hand-written lines we can see how meticulous Twain was in his word selection. In several of the passages he made slight corrections which were plainly intended to make the runaway slave, Jim, as noble as possible. It has long been a curiosity to me that this book, frequently criticized as "racist", has as it's two central characters a runaway slave and the "poor white trash" boy who decides to help him. At one point Huck is memorably torn between what the Southern Society he has been raised in says is right and what gnaws at his conscience. It is obviously an unqualified truth to Huck that Jim is uneducated and so poor that he doesn't even own himself, yet Jim possesses more humanity than any of the "civilized" southerners Huck meets. Seeing Clemens' own scrawl lets us see how diligently Clemens worked to make that distinction clear - that Jim is easily the most noble adult in the book.
I agree with Mr. Hemingway - Huckleberry Finn IS America's greatest novel. Thanks to rediscovering Twain's original text (and an entertaining sequence of events which is detailed in the introduction to this edition) we finally get to read America's greatest Novel the way that the author originally intended.
I cannot recommend this highly enough.
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Paperback - May 26 1994)
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