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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American classic that must be read by all (and never banned)
If there's any book out there that needs no introduction (or review, to be honest), it's Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Yet here I am reviewing it, anyway. I must admit (not without a fair share of embarrassment) that I just now got around to reading this American classic for the first time. I never had to read it in school, and to some degree I felt...
Published on May 5 2007 by Daniel Jolley

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2.0 out of 5 stars What Kind of Influence is HF having on teenagers or adults??
I recently had to read the book HF as a class assignment. As an interacal teenager I had a very hard time understanding and reading the book because the 'N'word is used SO frequently in the book. Am I the only one who finds it offensive? Just because HF is consider an American Classic does it change the meaning of the 'N' word. To me it doesn't make sense! I'm...
Published on Nov. 19 1999


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American classic that must be read by all (and never banned), May 5 2007
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
If there's any book out there that needs no introduction (or review, to be honest), it's Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Yet here I am reviewing it, anyway. I must admit (not without a fair share of embarrassment) that I just now got around to reading this American classic for the first time. I never had to read it in school, and to some degree I felt pretty familiar with the novel even without having read it -- that's just how popular and important Huckleberry Finn is to the social fabric of America.

Nowadays, with all the politically correct liberals having escaped their Berkeley zoo and run amuck all over the nation, many of our young people are told not to read this novel. In fact, legions of voices cry out for poor little Huck Finn, that beloved rascal of literature, to be banned from schools and libraries -- for the crime of using the n-word, a word commonly used by both blacks and whites up and down the Mississippi during Huck's time (not to mention numerous hip-hop artists of today). Turning a blind eye to the fact that Twain made the slave Jim a noble, human, easy-going fellow with his heart always in the right place (unlike Huck's other companions), the literary fascists contend that this novel is poison to the minds of youngsters. One can only imagine the reaction Mark Twain would have to the hysteria his book incites in liberals today (although he would certainly not be surprised, as he had to fight censorship of this book from the date of its publication).

One of the great ironies of the "Ban Huck Finn" brouhaha is the fact that young people will surely find this novel much more entertaining than the vast majority of other literary classics they are asked to read. This is a very funny book, especially once "the duke and the dauphin" arrive on the scene and, later, when Tom Sawyer meticulously plans out Jim's rescue from captivity (no thanks to the captors, who didn't even try to make it as difficult as Tom says it should be). Young readers will also relate to and understand this book, a fact which should give rise to spirited discussion of it in class. Don't we want our kids to be excited about books and reading?

The more outrageous the hissy fits thrown by liberal critics over the "dangers" of Huck Finn, the more important it is for everyone, young and old alike, to go out and read Twain's novel. Whenever someone tells you not to read something, it's important that you go out there and read it -- and discover whatever it is the book banning loonies don't want you to know. Prove to them that you are intelligent enough to know the difference between the social values of the past and present, fiction and reality, right and wrong, etc. Think for yourself. Read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece. (Spoiler Alert), July 27 2013
This review is from: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Paperback)
I think it goes without saying that Mark Twain is a genius, as a man, humourist, and writer in general. The characters he created in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' and more importantly, this book, are classics in literature. I loved this book so much - Twain's style is entrancing, and makes you forget at some points that you're actually reading a book. Reading 'Huckleberry Finn' is an experience, one that everyone should have.

It deals with everything American: the racial divide, the search for identity, the Actual and the Imaginary, the power of the individual over the many. The list could go on. Twain wrote a deceptively complex book, because children have loved it, and university students will continue to study it. It's a picaresque novel, a Bildungsroman, and more. I have heard about lots of controversy concerning racial language, but I stand firm in thinking that it's part of the journey, and should be there in order to adequately look at the world Twain has created.

The relationship between Huckleberry and Jim is really heart-warming: they're two outsiders trying to find their way in the world, and it's beautiful how they connect, and even more beautiful when Huck realizes just how unimportant race in defining a man. Jim is wise to more practical things (despite his superstitions), and it rubs off on his new friend as they drift down the Mississippi River.

If I can find any fault, it's this: the book goes on longer than it should. While it's nice that Jim is rescued in the end, and you get some kind of closure, I'm inclined to agree with Hemingway and other critics that it should have ended when he was handed over to the Phelps family. That is where Huckleberry's story really comes to a close - Tom Sawyer shouldn't have come back into the novel.

But that's minute. Read 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'! It'll stay with you for a long time after you've done it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Audra's Review of Huckleberry Finn, March 28 2004
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an exciting novel. It begins with the narrator (Huckleberry Finn) explaining that he and some friends (along with Tom Sawyer) are in a "Robber's Gang." Huck wishes to remain a part of this new gang but Tom Sawyer, who is a life long friend forces him to be respectable and stay in school in order to stay in the gang.
The Novel is set in St. Petersburg, Missouri. All is well, Huck Finn has money saved in the bank from treasures he and his friend Tom found. Unfortunately, Huck's father, who is a money hungry drunk, comes back to town and demands Huck's money. Huck was adopted by a lady named Widow Douglas. Huck's dad tries to fight for custody once he comes back to town but fails in his attempts. He then hangs around town and harrasses his son. Finally he kidnaps Huckand takes him to his cabin. In this part of the story the reader feels for Huck. His father locks him in their cabin when he leaves and when he returns home drunk, he beats him. The reader wants to see Huck stand up to his father and do something. Then, the reader gets what they want. Huck escapes from his father by faking his own death. He then sneaks off to an island in the Mississippi while the townspeople search the river for his body.
While he's living on the island he encounters another boy. His name is Jim. Huck and Jim become friends and live on the island together. Unfortunately, some townspeople saw smoke coming from the island so the boys are forced to leave. The novel goes on to follow Huckleberry Finn in his wild journey's across the Mississippi.
I thought that the book was a wonderful exciting tale of companionship and adventure. I would not hesitate to read this book again. Although the time period and the setting set me off from reading this novel before, when I finally read it I was pleasently suprised. I really liked how Huck Finn tells the story and the humor that is put into it. Mark Twain does a great job of making you feel like you are a part of the story as well. However, Mark Twain sometimes used racism that could be offensive to some. In my opinion, this book wouldn't have a clear setting of time period if he had left it out.
My favorite thing about this novel is that it is a story about a young boy and what he overcomes in life. I loved the friend ships and the childhood fasination of the outdoors. I would recommend this book to anyone who read the novel preceding it, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and also to anyone who enjoys a good adventure themselves.
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4.0 out of 5 stars MUST READ BOOK, March 11 2004
By A Customer
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an adventure book written by Mark Twain. Huck Finn sails down the Mississippi River on a raft. Huckleberry Finn shows his bravery by trying to escape from his father. In order to live Huck Finn has to try to run away or escape from his abusive father. To find out if he escapes from his father be sure to read this book.
This is a must read! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn will make reader feel like your Huck Finn. The reader will realize how hard it actually is for Huck Finn to live with his father and how hard it is to escape. This book is a book the reader just can't put down. The book takes a long time to get into so don't put this book down until you finish.
Mark twain is famous to most children my age. Twain was born in 1835 and died in1910 so he was 75 when he died. Mark Twain has written many books such as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Samuel Clemens is considered one of the greatest American writers. When the reader reads this book they will feel Huckleberry Finn's pain.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Audio CD of Classic, March 8 2004
By 
fra7299 "fra7299" (California, United States) - See all my reviews
Finally, a reading of a classic that is worth the money.
This story's narration covers a total of 9 Cds, and each disc has about 97 tracks (each track is only about 30 to 45 seconds). The good aspect of this is that it is quite easy to find your spot and, then pick up where you left off, if you happen to stop reading in the middle of a chapter. The negative aspect of short tracks is that it is difficult to skip around to particular chapters without "guessing" where a chapter might end (because there is no insert to tell which chapters are contained in each disc).
Overall, Dick Hill does a superb job of reading in this unabridged version of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Hill's voice personifies Huck's narrative, and he keeps the Southern flavor of Twain's novel intact. What makes this reading particularly great is that Hill has a great ability to not only take on Huck, but other characters as well. Hill changes his voice for other characters such as Tom Sawyer, Jim, the Duke and the king, Pap and others. For this reason, this CD is a great tool for the reluctant readers in classes, and serves as a great supplement for the study of this novel.
I have found that buying audios to classic to be a gamble because you never really know what you are getting, but this is one of the best I've gotten.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Feb. 20 2004
By 
Nick Robillard (New Hampton, NH United States) - See all my reviews
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a really interesting book about a boy and his adventures. The main character, Huck, narrates it. This gives it a certain amount of intimacy that it would not otherwise have. One of the things I found most interesting about this book is that Huck befriends a slave, Jim and helps him escape to freedom. This presents a large moral dilemma for him, because he does not want to be considered an abolitionist, but Jim is his friend. In the end he decides to help Jim and they raft down the Mississippi together. The description of their friendship is the best description I have ever read. Another aspect of the book that makes it all the more interesting to read is the colorful characters they meet along the way. Mark Twain has an incredible imagination and you then find yourself becoming attached to the characters as you move through the book. This is one of Mark Twain's greatest strengths. In the end I would recommend this book to readers of all ages because I think someone of any age could get something from it. Whether you read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as a means of entertainment, to gain a life lesson, or to understand the social pressure associated with befriending a black man prior to the Civil War, you will definitely be able to gain something from reading this novel.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The classic rebel, Oct. 19 2003
By 
Vagabond77 (Tennessee, USA) - See all my reviews
"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", as well as "Tom Sawyer" are a throw back to when life was simpler, when right and wrong were as simple as black and white, and there is no gray. When Huck and Tom are playing at the river or in the woods, reminds me of my own childhood. Also the superstitions are funny, but realistic for that kind of ignorant kids to believe in. Jim's "superstition" is more like watching birds for weathetr patterns, which is real fronieer skills back then. The story is that Huck Finn runs away from his abusive father. Along the way he helps Jim the slave escape. The two form a close friendship and that helps them get through several adventures; some funny and some some what scary. I will always love these books, but "Huckleberry Finn" is the best because it's a road trip, or rather a raft trip down the Mississippi River. This one also is more of a social commentery on the cruelty of Christian civilization, and the nobility and honor of the untamed savage.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Update your Library, May 31 2003
By 
Christopher C. Alsruhe (Baltimore, Maryland United States) - See all my reviews
I have been a long-time lover of Mark Twain's books. And being analytical, I want to know why something is written the way it is; I want to know the historical details behind his expression. So when I find that the Mark Twain Library has published Huckleberry Finn the way Mark Tain wanted it (unlike every edition that's ever been published, including the first!), I had to get it. Using all the explanatory notes--which are NOT cumbersome--and the glossary, and other notes about the text, I came away knowing that this book was truly what it is proclaimed to be: the best American novel ever written.
Having read just about all one can get their hands on by Mark Twain, this shed all new light on what Mark Twain was really saying when I read Huck Finn this time. The humour was more obvious, the sarcasm was more justified. The book itself opens up this door, but it helps to know what was in Mark's brain throughout his writing career.
Truly a must have for anyone into Mark Twain. I have purchased all that the MTL has put forth so far, and put my other editions in the yard sale box as errant texted that no longer interest me. I think any fan of Mark Twain will be tempted to do the same. Why read errant editions when one can have the author's intended, authoritative publication--with the original neat pixtures, too. I was so taken by this last reading of H. Finn that I've taken to memorizing some of the glossary terms. They are truly classic; bring'm back.
I am reminded of E. A. Poe's expectation that his works be published only as originally intended. This should not need to be requested by any author. To modify an author's writings for any reason is a type of sacrilege. Of course, even Poe's books are published different than he wanted. But thankfully, there are publishers who seek to restore the only versions worthy of publication. The Mark Twain Library is doing this, and any wanta-be authority in Mark Twain will never be such with "Penguins" and other bird-brained mass-market editions sitting on the shelf, or rather, in their hands.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Why read Huck Finn?, Jan. 29 2003
There are many reasons to read "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" --
1. It is a great American classic novel
2. It documents a period in history from the common-man's viewpoint.
3. It is banned by some libraries and schools (a must-read, therefore on my list always!)
4. It can teach you to write.
5. It's a great adventure story that can be read aloud to groups, or enjoyed by yourself!
The Fischer et al. edition attempts to reconstruct "Huck Finn" in the way Twain probably intended. In particular, there is a section showing how Twain revised the "Sunrise on the River" passage to perfectly reproduce the sound of English as spoken by Huck --so reading this is almost as if we are listening to a tape recording of Huck talking. If you are unsure about "Huck Finn", turn to the Sunrise passage and read it aloud. Then tell me you AREN'T an admirer of this novel.
As a lesson for writers, Twain's search to perfect his craft and reproduce the very sound of his characters, along with a splendid use of language and an ability to create adventuresome plot are unparalleled in American literature. Banned? Are you people NUTS? This is possibly one of the greatest American books ever written.
A MUST-READ if you love American literature, or really English language literature in general.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Jan. 5 2003
By 
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the classic pre-Civil War tale of a young boy, Huck, and a runaway African-American slave named Jim. Huck leaves because of his abusive father, and Jim has escaped his owner to become a free man in the North. On their raft, swiftly traveling down the Mighty Mississippi, Huck and Jim come across many southern towns along the river, bringing them to meet many interesting characters, and many adventures.
In this book, many southern dialects are used, and although it may be difficult to read at times, the overall effect created by it makes the story more lifelike. Being pre-Civil War, some of the language is outdated, and it may be difficult to read over some of the terms and ideas used and expressed, but the only reason for their use is to show Mark Twain's overall motive of the book that proves the negative effects of slavery in the United States.
If you liked The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, you'll love this book, because of their similarities in background, and the fact that they share the same main characters. Both books are Twain's masterpieces, and should both be read by all generations, young, old, and still to come.
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Paperback - May 26 1994)
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