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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
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on January 23, 2015
old classic a good read
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on November 1, 2014
Great addition to my library.
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on July 27, 2013
I think it goes without saying that Mark Twain is a genius, as a man, humourist, and writer in general. The characters he created in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' and more importantly, this book, are classics in literature. I loved this book so much - Twain's style is entrancing, and makes you forget at some points that you're actually reading a book. Reading 'Huckleberry Finn' is an experience, one that everyone should have.

It deals with everything American: the racial divide, the search for identity, the Actual and the Imaginary, the power of the individual over the many. The list could go on. Twain wrote a deceptively complex book, because children have loved it, and university students will continue to study it. It's a picaresque novel, a Bildungsroman, and more. I have heard about lots of controversy concerning racial language, but I stand firm in thinking that it's part of the journey, and should be there in order to adequately look at the world Twain has created.

The relationship between Huckleberry and Jim is really heart-warming: they're two outsiders trying to find their way in the world, and it's beautiful how they connect, and even more beautiful when Huck realizes just how unimportant race in defining a man. Jim is wise to more practical things (despite his superstitions), and it rubs off on his new friend as they drift down the Mississippi River.

If I can find any fault, it's this: the book goes on longer than it should. While it's nice that Jim is rescued in the end, and you get some kind of closure, I'm inclined to agree with Hemingway and other critics that it should have ended when he was handed over to the Phelps family. That is where Huckleberry's story really comes to a close - Tom Sawyer shouldn't have come back into the novel.

But that's minute. Read 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'! It'll stay with you for a long time after you've done it.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 9, 2006
Huckleberry Finn is a great book! It’s an adventure book by Mark Twain. The story takes place in Huck’s hometown of Petersburg, Missouri. This took place in the mid-1800’s when slavery was still legal in the southern states. The story really begins when Huck runs away from the widow and his drunken father. Huck decides to run away and start a new life without listening to the widow’s grown-up rules. He also wants to avoid being mugged by his father and locked up in a shed constantly.
There are two main characters in this book: Huckleberry Finn and Jim. Huckleberry is the boy who escapes his life and Jim is the widow’s slave. Huckleberry found Jim on the island he went to when he escaped from his evil stepfather. My opinion is that it’s a great adventure book and he has some travels in the story to remote islands and St. Louis, Missouri.
Even though it is a great novel there are some other parts in this book that tend to become violent, so the reader should be at least ten years old or more. If I had to rate this book I’d give it 9 stars out of 10. It could have been a 10 if the author but some more clear details about some conclusions for the characters. Example: Who and what happened to the murderers on the steamboat? I would have liked to know how Huck’s father died at the end of this novel.
This book is great if you’re looking for adventures about runaway kids or just exploring and being on your own. The added bonus in this book is that if you know the character known as Tom Sawyer from The Adventure’s of Tom Sawyer, he is in this book too!
Huckleberry Finn is a great book! It’s an adventure book by Mark Twain. The story takes place in Huck’s hometown of Petersburg, Missouri. This took place in the mid-1800’s when slavery was still legal in the southern states. The story really begins when Huck runs away from the widow and his drunken father. Huck decides to run away and start a new life without listening to the widow’s grown-up rules. He also wants to avoid being mugged by his father and locked up in a shed constantly.
There are two main characters in this book: Huckleberry Finn and Jim. Huckleberry is the boy who escapes his life and Jim is the widow’s slave. Huckleberry found Jim on the island he went to when he escaped from his evil stepfather. My opinion is that it’s a great adventure book and he has some travels in the story to remote islands and St. Louis, Missouri.
Even though it is a great novel there are some other parts in this book that tend to become violent, so the reader should be at least ten years old or more. If I had to rate this book I’d give it 9 stars out of 10. It could have been a 10 if the author but some more clear details about some conclusions for the characters. Example: Who and what happened to the murderers on the steamboat? I would have liked to know how Huck’s father died at the end of this novel.
This book is great if you’re looking for adventures about runaway kids or just exploring and being on your own. The added bonus in this book is that if you know the character known as Tom Sawyer from The Adventure’s of Tom Sawyer, he is in this book too!
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on June 15, 2004
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN REVIEW.
The adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a heartfilled story. It shows one teens journey through the Mississippi River, running away from his father and helping a runaway slave named Jim, who he soon befriends, to the north. This story shows how different some people can be, though they do have hard times, but are still true friends.
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is an exciting book that will keep you guessing. The writter Samuel Clemens, pen name of Mark Twain, really brings the story alive for you. He makes his story feel so real. It wasn't like I was just reading the story, It really felt like I was there, watching Huck and Jim floating down the Mississippi River on their log raft. Mark twain makes the journey so funfilled and full of enjoyment that you can't put the book down. I had to read this book for 6th grade during summer vacation. I thought it would be a drag, but as soon as I read the first chapter I couldn't put it down...not for a second. I couldn't wait to see what was comming next because with every chapter this book gets more and more exciting until the very last page.
The Adventures od Huckleberry Finn is fun, suspensful, and comical at some times. I would recommend this book to anyone, of any age who wants to get swept away in an amazing story.
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Those who would accuse Huck Finn of the atrocity of racism have probably never read this book. Yes, I am white, but the story is set up in such a way as to make Jim, the slave who is repeatedly referred to by that most forbidden of words, the most honorable and reasonable character in the book.
The story follows Huck Finn, a rebellious eleven-year-old boy without a mother and with a drunken crook for a father, as he decides to run away when his drunken father returns to town after a long absence and takes Huck back home with him. As Huck runs away, he meets up with Jim, a slave owned by his best friend Tom's aunt, who has also chosen to run away, heading north and seeking a better life. As they make their way down the Mississippi River, they meet a great deal of colorful characters and, most importantly, Huck grows as a person. He and Jim develop a deep, meaningful friendship, and Huck comes to realize that Jim is a man, no matter what the color of his skin is.
The book is hilarious and wildly entertaining, but is also tender and sweet. Mark Twain was truly a master author, and it is easy to see why this has been called The Great American Novel. The book never drags or fails to hold your attention. I would suggest that any child younger than thirteen or so would be talked to about the "N-word" before reading it, but I certainly do not feel that it should be yanked from their hands and forbidden. The book has far too much value to sit on a bookshelf and not be read. A simple explanation that this word was a part of the vernacular at the time the book was written but is now no longer acceptable and that only hateful people use it seems like it would suffice.
Don't let this book drown in the controversy that it attracts. It is far too valuable a piece of literature to get lost in the shuffle.
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on May 18, 2004
Okay. Time to admit something: I never read Huckleberry Finn in school. I'm not sure whether or not we had to, but I never experienced this book until now, in my twenties. What a trip! I had no idea. I was prepared for a "racist" book, and it wasn't. The "N" word was used, but not in a hateful way; only as a way that people spoke long ago. Not that that makes it right, but I didn't see what all the hoopla was/is about. And there are so many books that owe a debt to Twain for so many reasons: The use of child narrator voice; coming of age; humor. CATCHER IN THE RYE, TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, and McCrae's BARK OF THE DOGWOOD are just a few that come to mind. Whatever you do, give FINN a chance. This is a great American classic. No, it's not a short book, but it is fascinating.
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on April 19, 2004
When I had to read this book, my first thoughts were, Southern life in the 1800s? Why would I care? Some people are just living in the past.
How wrong I was.
This book is so great and can be enjoyed by all people, with the exception of close(d)-minded inviduals. The story is about Huckleberry Finn, son of a drunk, regarded as uncivilized and morally lacking. The book is written in the 1st person point of view from Huck's eyes. \
To put it briefly, the whole book is about Huck trying to help Jim, a runaway slave, get free. Throughout, there are many episodes on the Mississippi River, where many adventures take place. We get to see Huck grow and mature as a person, having to make decisions and occasionally lie or dress up, yielding humorous moments often. The characterization of Jim is done very well by Twain, and we realize in the end that Jim is the most humane, caring person in the story.
The ending was extremely disappointing, from the standpoint of the rest of the book. I will only say this: Tom Sawyer is a jackass. But don't take my word for it, read it yourself and judge for yourself; many regard the ending as great and an appropriate way for things to end. What's done is done, though, and the book still remains a great tale of friendship and adventure.
What the book is not, is racist. The N-word is used, but that is for the effect of realism and credibility. If anything, the book is anti-racist, as can be seen in the relationship between Huck and Jim. The book, being written by Mark Twain and all, contains a lot of satire and humor, which is extremely enjoyable.
May this book live on, it definitely still matters and teaches us many a great deal.
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on March 28, 2004
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an exciting novel. It begins with the narrator (Huckleberry Finn) explaining that he and some friends (along with Tom Sawyer) are in a "Robber's Gang." Huck wishes to remain a part of this new gang but Tom Sawyer, who is a life long friend forces him to be respectable and stay in school in order to stay in the gang.
The Novel is set in St. Petersburg, Missouri. All is well, Huck Finn has money saved in the bank from treasures he and his friend Tom found. Unfortunately, Huck's father, who is a money hungry drunk, comes back to town and demands Huck's money. Huck was adopted by a lady named Widow Douglas. Huck's dad tries to fight for custody once he comes back to town but fails in his attempts. He then hangs around town and harrasses his son. Finally he kidnaps Huckand takes him to his cabin. In this part of the story the reader feels for Huck. His father locks him in their cabin when he leaves and when he returns home drunk, he beats him. The reader wants to see Huck stand up to his father and do something. Then, the reader gets what they want. Huck escapes from his father by faking his own death. He then sneaks off to an island in the Mississippi while the townspeople search the river for his body.
While he's living on the island he encounters another boy. His name is Jim. Huck and Jim become friends and live on the island together. Unfortunately, some townspeople saw smoke coming from the island so the boys are forced to leave. The novel goes on to follow Huckleberry Finn in his wild journey's across the Mississippi.
I thought that the book was a wonderful exciting tale of companionship and adventure. I would not hesitate to read this book again. Although the time period and the setting set me off from reading this novel before, when I finally read it I was pleasently suprised. I really liked how Huck Finn tells the story and the humor that is put into it. Mark Twain does a great job of making you feel like you are a part of the story as well. However, Mark Twain sometimes used racism that could be offensive to some. In my opinion, this book wouldn't have a clear setting of time period if he had left it out.
My favorite thing about this novel is that it is a story about a young boy and what he overcomes in life. I loved the friend ships and the childhood fasination of the outdoors. I would recommend this book to anyone who read the novel preceding it, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and also to anyone who enjoys a good adventure themselves.
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on March 16, 2004
I have just finished reading this book to my two boys (7 and 10). It was a bit long for them really, especially the younger one. And yet it is a very engaging novel that had them periodically laughing, or breathless with their eyes popping out. It is at times a bit grim, and at times a bit farcical. It's also pretty hard to read aloud with all those accents and voices. But it is above all a story of resourcefulness, of conscience and of survival. And, of course, it is sufficiently exotic in time and place for modern Australians, as we are, to add an extra dimension to the enjoyment.
If you plan to read it to your children, allow yourself plenty of time, be prepared to pause and discuss some of the issues (such as slavery, which we no longer tolerate and yet it was not necessarily the worst of outcomes for some people). You will enjoy it I am sure (and, yes, we had read Tom Sawyer earlier although that isn't necessary)
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